There must be 50 ways to remember Amarone

Memories of Verona

Buona Pasqua to everyone in the Veneto, Verona and as the title of this article indicates, a very Happy Easter to our friends and producers in Valpolicella. My last visit to the area was in October 2018 for a sidestep away from a Lake Garda focused journey west of the Adige River. Two years earlier I spent a September 2016 week in Verona and the Valpolicella Valleys. After that trip I published all my notes on the DOCs; Valpolicella (inclusive of Classico and Superiore) and Valpolicella Ripasso. The fact of the matter is on that week-long tasting through corvina, corvinone, rondinella, molinara, croetine and oseleta I also sipped, swirled and assessed a number of Amarone della Valpolicella DOCG and Recioto della Valpolicella DOCG. In between those two Veronese excursions there was a July 2017 Collisioni experience in Piemonte and during that festival a Progetto Vino Masterclass showed and poured the wines of eight Famiglie dell’Amarone producers. It just seems every trip to northern Italy must include Amarone.

Related – Valpolicella, Ripasso Valpolicella

Villa Moron, Negrar

Those collective tasting notes never made it to print, that is until now. Following those 2016, 2017 and 2018 voyages to northern Italian regions I published a host of articles and many notes, but as with every immensely immersive media trip there is always unfinished business. Each and every travel return to Canada requires the day to day of real world work detail; tasting through VINTAGES releases, consignment, private order and potential to market wines, followed by editing and publishing those reviews; restaurant buying and staff education too; most gratifying is wine education, sharing regional wine experiences and gained knowledge with sommeliers, other journalists and peers. The rigours of home and work life don’t always allow for every travel stone to be unturned.

Related – Barbera d’Asti Del Monferrato E Nizza Monferrato

Verona, September 2016

What can be attacked by retrospective means are notebooks scribbled by design and computer folders layered, pages and files filled with thoughts left to await their eventual fruition, temporarily resigned to the arena of “the never too late.”  This kind of post on Godello always comes accompanied by a huge sense of gratitude to the regional facilitators, logistical magicians and dozens of producers who share their life’s work, engage in conversation and give so generously of their time. These are the 50 wines tasted three, four and five years ago. Forty one Amarone and nine Recioto surveyed, evaluated, admired and yet consigned in those times, resigned to drafts, now unburdened, released and published.

Amarone della Valpolicella DOCG

Bertani Amarone Della Valpolicella Classico DOCG 2013

“You can like it or not but this is what Bertani Amarone Classico is supposed to be,” the words of host Michaela at the historic estate founded in 1857. The first vintage was 1959. Made the same way today. “This is a medication wine,” no sorry, “meditation.” Again, points are credited for the lack of jam, the shortness of breath and the heavy shaken oak restraint. But once again the charm needs to be coaxed. There is undeniable structure to look decades forward and to read the tea leaves for its past. Perhaps a virtual walk through a forest will ensue. Perhaps. Drink 2019-2029.  Tasted September 2016

Bertani Amarone Della Valpolicella Valpantena DOCG 2013

A 30 day drying period instead of 50, quite short for the region. Aged in Slavonian oak barrels, an earlier developing, made to drink with food early in life kind of Amarone. Sour cherry and dark chocolate. Quite young but I can’t see it getting much more interesting than this. Made for a consumer that has never tried an Amarone before and wants a gateway entry. Clocks in at 15.5 per cent, certainly not jammy though you feel the density and the weight. Drink 2016-2020.  Tasted September 2016

Brigaldara Amarone Della Valpolicella Classico DOCG Casa Vecie 2011

“At thirty three years old (1986) I came back to the family farm. It was the best decision of my life,” says Stefano Cesari. “I like this business. In my time the problem was the market. Now it is the cost of soil. You need big investment.” More elegance driven into this dusty, dried red fruit Amarone than most, with some frutta di bosco and fragola secco, heat on the nose in a slightly volatile way (or acetic) but plenty of equality abounds. Plenty of fruit and savoury character equals it all out. In Valpolicella west facing vineyards bring stronger wines and in the east more elegance. CCR, (40/40/20). Two years in barriques and two in 25 HL casks. The chocolate comes late. At 16.4 per cent this strikes an accord. Drink 2019-2029.  Tasted July 2017

Alfredo Buglioni

Buglioni Il Lussurioso Amarone Della Valpolicella Classico Riserva DOCG 2011

Alfredo Buglioni’s Riserva 2011 is a case study of 25 per cent in 50 hL barrel in a Valpolicella that bridges the old and the new school of Amarone. It notes less confiture and dried fig, negative reduction, inducement and decreasing hyperbole, from concentration, of facets and tents getting on one page together and of sugar levels. Palates of the Amarone are rarely so alive, sparked and again, as per the thread run through this house, electric. The properties of chalky and tannic will churn this through a ten year development wheel. Drink 2019-2027.  Tasted September 2016 and October 2017

Ca’ La Bionda Amarone Della Valpolicella Classico DOCG 2011

The bright, freshest Amarone, light as it can possibly be, with smoky limestone and volcanic influence mixed with clay. If you can’t see the forests (minerals) for the trees (soils) than you won’t get this Amarone. “If I am home I don’t drink Amarone,” says Alessandro Castellani, but you just know he sneaks some sips in the cellar. There is cherry in softly crushed ways and the silky palate with nary a chocolate moment. Just a baby, fleshing quickly so just imagine the feel in another 18 months. Drink 2018-2027.  Tasted September 2016

Ca’ La Bionda Amarone Della Valpolicella Classico DOCG Vigneti Di Ravazzòl 2012

A blend of 70 per cent corvina, (20) corvinone and (10) rondinella plus molinara from the renowned stony clay-limestone hill Ravazzòl. The vines average 50-70 years of age and in 2012 the Amarone is a lithe 16 per cent alcohol with necessary and alter-ego balancing acidity. Ca’ La Bionda acidity, singular, arisen from the mineral terroir to rise above most of the Classico territory. A wine that already sets about to linger almost before the first sip is taken, lending credence to the contemplative and meditative Valpolicella ideal. Even when a wine is so powerful it can elicit serenity and calm. Drink 2018-2032.  Tasted September 2016

Ca’ La Bionda Amarone Della Valpolicella Classico DOCG Vigneti Di Ravazzòl 2011

Generally speaking the Ravazzòl blend is 70 per cent corvina, (20) corvinone and (10) rondinella plus molinara. The clay-limestone soil is unequivocally the thing that changes the wine and with time the emerge is all about more mineral and spice. Much older vines (minimum 50 years old) bring about an increased richness but also a more lifted brightness. “This is my idea of Amarone, traditional but unusual,” tells Alessandro Castellani. “We’ve invented nothing.” Sapidity, acidity, supple peppery schisty-like, syrah-esque spice. Again a bite but no scathe. “It’s difficult to make an Amarone that is powerful with drinkability. You need a good terroir.” Drink 2019-2029.  Tasted September 2016

Ca’ La Bionda Amarone Della Valpolicella Classico DOC Vigneti Di Ravazzòl 2008

Just bottled one month ago after eight years in wood (Botti Grandi) so despite the age its just a baby. The wood is still quite up front. Here the most floral though the palate is thick and compressed, spice of course, as in all the wines but somehow there is evidence of what you have come to expect, despite the youth. The confusion and the conundrum align to cause your brain to say “too young to really know anything.” This is the beauty of complexity in Alessandro Castellani’s Amarone, specifically from the clay-limestone hill that is Ravazzòl. Drink 2020-2030.  Tasted September 2016

Ca’ La Bionda Amarone Della Valpolicella Classico DOC Vigneti Di Ravazzòl 2004

Opened two hours earlier, a cool vintage slowly fast-forwarded to today’s elegance. Is it mature? Of sorts as it carries the soil in its blood and whiffs like it was intended to be though I personally find it extreme youthful. A slight (as it used to be) sweetness (6 g/L of RS) and there is tobacco smouldering in a cedar box. Still not quite opening yet, spending an hour with it (or more) would be ideal. Undefined red citrus, exotica, florals, finesse, balance and elegance. Though it may have once been or at least acted-seemed greener, it has made it to this pretty stage. An integrated beauty. Drink 2016-2026.  Tasted September 2016

Locanda 800

Ca’Rugate Amarone Della Valpolicella DOCG 2013

Sees 32 months in barrel, of course there is richness and some very bright fruit but what is remarkable is the transparency, the claret consistency and the relative thin (and thankfully so) veneer. Finding this quite mineral, full of soil tang and with the barrel program here all new it’s quite an impossibility. As in Ca’Rugate’s whites, the barrel adds spice and some smoulder, not thick, glycerin and caky texture. This is Amarone you can drink, even if it’s a bit of smoke and mirror talk but it’s really done in the right way and for all the right reasons. At 16 per cent it fools with great acumen. Same vintage twice and yes, truly consistent. Drink 2017-2025.  Tasted September 2016

Cantina Di Negrar Amarone Della Valpolicella Classico DOCG 2013

A massive mouthful of Amarone with more varieties of chocolate than thought possible confined to one sweet and savoury bottle. Rich, extracted, caky and oozing with that aforementioned chocolate swirling in the machine, lathered like warm ganache and oozing out of a flourless torte’s every pore. Everything you might expect from Amarone in the developing Valpolicella world. Drink 2019-2025.  Tasted September 2016

Cantine Negrar Domini Veneti Amarone Della Valpolicella Classico Superiore DOCG Verjago 2011

From grapes dried between five and six weeks, here the octane runs high, the sugars fully developed for a warm and generous Amarone. The spice cupboard is joined by tobacco and plenty of sweet Amaro bitters, with dusty espresso and a minimum 76 per cent chocolate all over the finish, still with massive tannin. A huge expression with an RS between seven and eight g/L. Drink 2018-2023.  Tasted September 2016

Cantine Negrar Domini Veneti Amarone Della Valpolicella Classico DOCG Vigneti Di Jago 2010

Now here, in my opinion, from a most excellent vintage, with more red fruit and less obvious splintering the freshness persists and the charm continues to draw emotive consideration. The impression brings some soil/terroir gifting, with aromas that suggest multi-stone (limestone and basalt) and freshness from clay. Though the sweetness seems elevated (an RS of 12 or more?) at least the red fruit, citrus expressed and thriving acidity is a match to the Amarone thing. Though massive again, with raging tannin, there is more honesty in this wine. Drink 2016-2022.  Tasted September 2016

Famiglia Pasqua Amarone Della Valpolicella Classico DOCG Villa Borghetti 2012

Comes in at 15 per cent, produced in Marano della Valpolicella, the drying process lasts up to four months (depending on the dates of harvest) for a 30-40 per cent loss of moisture into grape and sugars concentration. Sees 12 months in French barriques, is a fresher style of Amaraone, with quality red fruit but the flavours are directed by formula, cloyingly medicinal and acidified tart. Admittedly with its spice and its sweetness it loves the cheese and the dried fruit. Drink 2016-2019.  Tasted September 2016

Famiglia Pasqua Amarone Della Valpolicella Classico DOCG Mai Dire Mai 2010

Joint ventures between two families, a whopping 16.5 per cent, from corvina (65 per cent), corvinone (15), rondinella (10) and oseleta (10). The work of never say never, single-vineyard (Vignetti Montevegro val d’Illasi), up to four months appassimento, 44 days fermentation, mostly in new barriques for 24 months. The wood occupies the central square in the city centre, taking up residence with what seems to be exceptional fruit though its suppression hides what it might want to offer. Mocha chocolate big time, heat of the night and so much spice. Chalky clay dense and weighty. Intense Amarone. Cherries seeping in spirit water, over the top but for the right reasons where many would follow. Drink 2018-2022.  Tasted September 2016

In motion at Fidora

Fidora Amarone Della Valpolicella Classico DOCG Monte Tabor 2010

A massive mouthful of Amarone with a boozy effect to make it seem as though it is quite sweet when in fact it’s an Amarone of extreme relative acidity. The RS level is oddly, curiously and impossibly low at 2.0 g/L with balancing thanks to massive dry extract and fierce, competitive and autocratic tannins. Not to mention 36-42 months in barrel that may as well have been 48, or more. Where else have you ever tasted such a thing? Needs a few to many more years to find its way. Drink 2020-2032.  Tasted September 2016

Masi Serego Alighieri Amarone Della Valpolicella Classico Vaio Armaron 2011

The descendants of San Pietro. Single Vineyard from the Serego Alighieri Estate, 70 corvina, 20 rondinella and 10 molinara, only in the best vintages. Use of cherry wood, brings more oxidation, but it’s only employed for four months. 15.5, illusion of sweetness, 6-7 g/L RS.  Last tasted July 2017

The Vaio Amaron is both highly polished and heavily composed Amarone with history, tradition and the way it has always been exuding out of every appassimento pore. Sourced from the eponymous vineyard which lays claim “it seems” to the name itself, this is Masi’s most iconic Amarone. The not quite reached prime time fig-centric red to black fruit is bright and alive but do not be fooled. The depths of plum and marly earth are plumbed, mined and excavated for full bore corvina, rondinella and molinara heavy exercize. From what I have come to recognize as a most excellent Amarone vintage (even though it is way too young to even begin to appreciate) you had better pull out the Monte Veronese for this dangerous and formidable Veneto. Drink 2019-2034.  Tasted September 2016

Nicolis Amarone Della Valpolicella Classico DOCG 2010

A blend of 65 corvina, 20 rondinella, 10 croatina and 5 molinara with a bit of SO2 that needs air to release. The reduction is consistent with the fresher Valpolicellas. Old school, deep red fruit, really fleshy, more than the price is drinkable, this has so much in common with similarly weighted reds, like sonoma cabernet sauvignon, Chianti classico Gran Selezione and Rhône Gigondas. Interesting comparisons aside (and stylistically they are valid) this is a rich, concentrated, high glycerin Amarone with a warm, sweet finish. Orange fleshy, summer patio melon liqueur cocktail. Very consumer friendly for a Keg Steakhouse red. Drink 2016-2021.  Tasted September 2016

Nicolis Amarone Della Valpolicella DOC Ambrosan 2008

Tallying in at 16 per cent alcohol which is par for the Amarone course and a number completely normal for the 2008 vintage. While it may be a bruiser it has barely walked out of its toddler shoes and is indeed a corvina blend of deepest intent. The eight year mark is where the layering begins to unfold and a glimpse variegates right here in this glass. A thick one, with a naturally funky porcine cure, humid and ideal for slices of ham in all iterations. Also perfect for the cuisine of Chef Diego Donatelli at Locanda 800 in Negrar. Drink 2018-2029.  Tasted September 2016

Nicolis Amarone Della Valpolicella DOC Ambrosan 2007

Single vineyard, current vintage available, sold in the LCBO, 70 corvina, 20 rondinella, 10 croatina, first made in 1990 (the normale was first made in 1978). This combines the rich extraction and big barrel impart of the Ripasso into a fortified, layered and deeply compressed Amarone. Sweetness seems magnified. The bretty voltility is part of the party. A mix of sweet, saline and savoury, not yet umami and still so young because it’s thick and taut. Will be late in 2017 before anything changes. Drink 2018-2028.  Tasted September 2016

Novaia Amarone Della Valpolicella Classico DOCG Le Balze 2011

Bottled in March and will likely be released in December. Single-vineyard aged three years in (some new and mostly old) barrels. Vines were planted in 1996, so now just entering right into the proverbial wheelhouse of exceptionality. It will have up to another 10 years or so before those vines will likely succumb to the Mal d’este wood disease. Richer, softer, gentle and amenable especially to taste, but that acidity, power and tannin does not relent. The aging adds to the density, the clay in this vineyard adds to the power and all tolled this is bigger and with more layered brawn than the Corte Vaona. Two different slices of Amarone pie. This one with a big chocolate espresso finale. Drink 2019-2028.  Tasted September 2016

Salvaterra Amarone Della Valpolicella Classico DOC 2009

Plenty of oak, including American, on the nose with the gamut run in kernel, nut and smoke. With Monte Veronese cheese aged 18 and 24 months the savoury and herbal aspects are foiled with reigned in agreement. This is modernity to the extreme, like some equally forged or a cross between Gran Selezione and Barolo, firm, concentrated but not shaken. Still quite youthful. Drink 2017-2027.  Tasted September 2016

Salvaterra Amarone Della Valpolicella Classico DOC 2007

Seems typical of the vintage, softer, rich and quite getable though there is heat and the aromatics of distraction; menthol, clove, vanilla, lavender, fennel and even cola. How this reminds me of high octane California pinot noir I’m not sure but it does. So thoroughly modern but without the same structure of 2009 and certainly not 2008, if that were tasted here as well. Drink 2016-2020.  Tasted September 2016

Santa Sofia Amarone Della Valpolicella Classico DOCG 2011

A representative of a best vintage, a specific vineyard and the addition of molinara (five per cent), stabilizer and a grape that has been ripped out to be omitted from the other wines. Quite remarkably perfumed with florals (roses and violets) that Amarone just does not often have. Except here it is, fresh and potpourri and then a mouthfeel that goes to velvet despite the dangerously intense acidity. The finish is dusted with espresso and shaved by bittersweet chocolate. Not as drinkable, with more structure and outright hedonism. Will live in infamy. Drink 2018-2033.  Tasted September 2016

Sartori Amarone Della Valpolicella DOCG 2012

The blend is 50 per cent corvina, (30) corvinone, (15) rondinella and (5) cabernet sauvignon. Comes in at 15 per cent abv, after a hot summer, four months drying process, raisin and plum with a baked fruit character. Fleshy and nearly though not entirely severe. Steeped tea of a few varieties, some forest floor, deep and brooding tannins. Sage and balsamic. Would not wait any longer. This should be consumed early. Drink 2016-2019.  Tasted September 2016

Sartori Amarone Della Valpolicella DOC I Saltari 2009

Old vines (some more than 40, average age of 20), low yields (1.5 tonnes per hectare), again quite secondary, almost into prune but certainly of a fig character. Though this wine and the Corte Bra have developed quite quickly their body and disposition are left off in the middle, leaning away from the overs of extraction, over-pressing and over oaking. You may not accuse the Sartori wines of over oaking. They are made with some restraint, against the rising norm, but they do brood with dark as night character. Drink 2016-2022.  Tasted September 2016

Sergio Zenato Amarone Della Valpolicella DOCG 2010

Founded in 1960, village near Lago Garda on the east side. Village of Santa Moggio, where the Valoplicella estate is located. Father was Sergio, now with sister and mother. CCR 60-20-20 plus oselata and croetine grown at 300masl, red clay with stones, difficult to retain water so irrigation is used. This is the dried fig and chocolate bomb, with soy, balsamic and five spice. So Mediterranean savoury, thick and shaken. Lots of French vanilla feel with 300L French tonneaux and 500L, plus 300L and 5000L French and Slavonian oak casks. This may never, ever fully integrate. It’s the thickest milkshake you will ever find. It’s a mess at this time and 17 per cent so wait 10 more years for it to get interesting. Drink 2027-2042.  Tasted July 2017

Speri Vigneto Amarone Della Valpolicella Classico DOCG Monte Sant’Urbano 2012

Family business in Valpolicella. Single-Vineyard, top of the hill in the Fumane Valley. Fume, as in hot, from its volcanic origins, especially for corvina. Soft soils (in texture, yellowish, friable but gets sticky when wet so over cover crops like fescue and clover are employed) and this will translate into the wine. Heavy in corvina (80 per cent) with reasoning because of its affiliation to volcanic soil and because winemaker (of 25 years) Alberto Speri simply thinks it’s the best grape. The grape that finds the most elegance. High percentage of drying (40 per cent), use of big oak, four years. Will go out on a limb and say this will indeed be the most elegant in a line up of eight formidable Amarone. Drink 2019-2032.  Tasted July 2017

Good morning @C_Valpolicella from @accordinilgino

Stefano Accordini Amarone Della Valpolicella Classico DOCG Acinatico 2013

The latin name of the wine is Acinatico, from ancient Rome, indicating the wines delineated from this place, produced from these specific berries. The vines were planted by grandfather Gaetano and are now up to 85 years old. Quite reductive and so very rushed into market young but this is the normale so perfectly understandable. A whack of tannin is met by acidity in the most rushing wave of red citrus. The wine is so taut and wound that the house style of secondary savoury character hasn’t even become a twinkle in its eye. Chocolate shavings cover everything, they cover everything. The chocolate of Accordini. Drink 2019-2024.  Tasted September 2016

Stefano Accordini Amarone Della Valpolicella Classico DOCG Acinatico 2010

Has developed righteously, from a gritty and serious vintage, for which tannin was not at a premium. Plenty of expertly tempered chocolate works the mid-palate and the tart finish with a baker’s glaze. This is heavily wooded Amarone, sweet and custardy, mouth coating and really 90’s. Like Rioja or IGT from the same time period. Drink 2016-2020.  Tasted September 2016

Tedeschi Amarone della Valponicella Classico DOCG Monte Olmi 2011

Monte Olmi is a two and a half hectare parcel, southwest in the Classica area, where the winery is located. This archetypal Amarone was first produced in 1964 and is now an 8,000-10,000 bottle per year effort. The mix is classic Tedeschi corvina, corvinone and rondinella, in a one third of each plus minor percentages of oselata and several other endemic varieties (rossignola, negrara, dindarella, croatina and forselina), from the oldest parts of Monte Omi. This is the Amarone to celebrate tradition, keeping history alive and always remembering from where you’ve come. It spent four years in large casks and emerged at 17 per cent alcohol. The ceiling is reached, with balls, brash and no worries but is it balanced? Remarkably it is and also sour-edged, with tannin and the crazy, wild and free spirit of red fruit drawn off of morainic white and yellow limestone. But it will certainly improve and last as long as any. The acidity will see to that, even if the fruit fades. Drink 2021-2035.  Tasted July 2017

Tenuta Sant’Antonio Amarone Della Valpolicella DOCG Campo Dei Gigli 2012

Youngish winery, still essentially first generation, started in 1995. Armando Castagnedi is one of four brothers and Paolo is winemaker. They were born and worked in the vineyards but sold to cooperatives before. In the east (not in Classico), Montegarbi. The symbol of the flower of Sant’Antonio. White limestone chalky soil, lime and sand. Corvina (35), corvinone (35), rondinella (25) with croetina and oselata because of their elevation, wind, proximity to the sea with that wind in mind. Three years in tonneaux, not big barrels (young producer compromise). Clean and fruity with a syrupy pool in the middle, welling on the palate. Clocks in at 16 per cent, come out tonight. Drink 2017-2019.  Tasted July 2017

Tenuta Santa Maria Amarone Della Valpolicella Classico DOCG 2010

Separated five years ago from the parent (Bertani) winery. Gaetano Bertani is the winemaker with the help of consulting oenologist Franco Bernabei. One 7th the size of the larger Bertani, 380,000 bottles vs. 2.5 million and no one from the family works with them at all. Amarone is corvina, corvinone and rondinella, reductive and young, in need of air and so much more. Plenty of acidity and a rage of tannin. The red fruit capacity is boundless and with all the rage around this whirls like a hurricane. Rocking Amarone, old-school, leathery and dry. Drier than the Ripasso. Fruit leather roll-up. Restrained at 15 per cent alcohol and acts like less. The number is 7.5 g/L RS. Drink 2016-2022.  Tasted September 2016

Tommasi Amarone Della Valpolicella Classico Riserva DOC Ca’ Florian 2009

Presented by PierAngelo Tommasi. Founded in 1902, the new generation is 1997, nine “kids” from four fathers. Only since 1990 has this vineyard been dedicated to a single-vineyard wine and since 2010 as a Riserva. “This wine tastes this way because of the vineyard,” says PierAngelo “and not because it is called a Riserva.” CCR, 75-20-5. Fermentation in wooden vats and the aging in 500L (French) tonneaux (in the first year) is a departure (for Tommasi) and the next three are in large Slavonian casks. This is the third vintage for Ca’ Florian and though it is massive, it is not volatile nor is it acetic. At 15.5 per cent and 4 g/L of RS it states the least obvious connotational expectation for the style and goes against its peers. This should be the top vintage of this SV wine, considering the integration, the level of fruit, the texture and the potential for aging. Drink 2019-2032.  Tasted June 2017

Valentina Cubi Morar Amarone Della Valpolicella Classico DOCG 2010

Valentina’s estate is now farmed certified organica though some older Amarones were not. From 1963, the estate dates back to the 18th century. At 16.5 it has to be a lie, again, not just because of colour but clearly its lightness of being is anti-Amarone. The grip and the grit of the aridity and tannin is the crux of this wine but there is plenty of fruit. That said it has chocolate and woody notes that give it some commonality so it is obvious that Amarone is almost impossible to change and to seek revolution. But this is 2010, before Valentina could write organic on the label and before the winemaking turned to its present motives. It was also the vintage. Structured and long. 2018-2025.  Tasted September 2016

Valentina Cubi Morar Amarone Della Valpolicella Classico DOC 2007

In ways that composition and result make for a dramatic difference, this is more traditional, darker and more extracted but also cooler, further into savour and with that umami prevalent throughout the region. This is not separate or antithetical, quite spicy and wholly tannic. and yet it is neither thick nor overdone. White chocolate is all in, This 2007 has more finesse but also real creaminess, sweet, savoury and blanketing. And that umami, mushroom and consomée. Drink 2016-2021.  Tasted September 2016

Valentina Cubi Morar Amarone Della Valpolicella Classico DOC 2005

Wholly, utterly, invisibly resolved, all umami, full truffle, dried forest floor and porcini mushroom. Something pine savoury but all vanilla and green tea ice cream. Spice and smoke all over the palate and the finish. Clocks in at 16 per cent alcohol. Very good vintage and showing well. Must have been a tannic beast in its time. Drink 2016-2019.  Tasted September 2016

Venturini Amarone Della Valpolicella Classico DOCG Campo Masua 2011

Centre of the Classica area southwest of Negrar. Vines in the 20-25 year range, rocky and clay under the topsoil. “Toar” as in volcanic, a very friable soil. A very clear strata separation between soil and rock. Hot and very dried fruit aromas which conspire to mask the florals aching to get out. A corvina (70 per cent), corvinone (10) and rondinalla (20) blend, dried for five months “in the natural way” and aged in 3000L big barrels for four years. Dried plum and apricot, roasted almond, charred onion and smoked meat. Spicy off the piquant charts. Sweetness follows. 16.5 and every bit of it. Drink 2019-2026.  Tasted July 2017

Vignetti Di Ettore Amarone Della Valpolicella Classico DOCG 2012

One of the more if not the most fragrant Amarone, of peppery plum and pomegranate fruit, richness, depth and plenty of dusty espresso. Acidity and tannin are equal and opposing, subduing fruit for the time being though three of four years down the road all should be in synch. This will develop umami. For now it lurks. Drink 2019-2026.  Tasted September 2016

Vignetti Di Ettore Amarone Della Valpolicella Classico DOC 2008

The 2008 is right where the 2012 projects to be in four years, carrying its peppery and stemmy spice into a secondary world inhabited by figs and still to be determined dried fruit. Tannins were tougher in 2008 and acidity higher so this remains just a baby. Plenty of espresso, again, but also some developed chocolate. A really well made Amarone from back in the day. Drink 2017-2025.  Tasted September 2016

Zonin Amarone Della Valpolicella DOCG 2011

Looking for freshness, fruit, that corvina punch. Plums again as are all the wines and grinds upon grinds of pepper. So much syrah is like this. New world syrah. Plenty of chocolate. A bit weighty but the acidity and tannin will drive this machine. It is a fruit first Amarone, that much is clear. The spice is everywhere though, which speaks to the wood as a major part of the impression. Very typical. How it was and many observe as should be. Hot finish detracts from the fruit freshness Drink 2017-2026.  Tasted September 2016

Recioto Della Valpolicella DOCG

Buglioni Recioto Della Valpolicella Classico DOCG ‘Il Narcisista’ (500 Ml) 2011

Like honey, with leesy, cheesy, red citrus and earthy notes mixed in. Gracious natural sweetness, use of sulphur to stop the fermentation, 140 g/L of rS (which is the maximum, can be as low as 110). The nose is remarkable, short on the sweetness despite the honey, so more like honeycomb. Good narcissist, if there is such a thing. Drink 2017-2027.  Tasted September 2016

Ca’ La Bionda Recioto Della Valpolicella Classico DOCG 2012

The drinkable Recioto with a level of sugar comparable to many producers’ Amarone. Aromas resemble the Amarone, as does the mouthfeel. Once you taste this “dessert” wine you can never go back. Plum, strawberry, beautiful. Caressing. Elegant. Finessed. Drink 2016-2028.  Tasted September 2016

Ca’ Rugate Recioto Della Valpolicella DOCG L’Eremita 2012

From a 500 mL bottle, a sweet disposition on a moderate (13.5 per cent) alcohol frame with Amaro liqueur bitterness. Liquorice and menthol on the nose, then plum pudding, black cherry dominant and mint jelly to taste. So much cooler than to what expectation would have made a commitment. Oh, it’s a Cherry Blossom, dark chocolate and when cracked open lets out the ooze of silky confection. Drink 2016-2021.  Tasted September 2016

Domini Veneti Amando Recioto Della Valpolicella Classico DOCG Amandorlato (Charmat Method Spumante Recioto) 2010

Charmat Method spumante Recioto, from one of last producers to do so, carrying on the home bottler’s accidental tradition. In the past apricot (or cherry) leaves or seeds were added to impart an almond flavour (Amandorlato) but today it’s developed leaving the Recioto in small cherry wood barriques with a low, slow and sugar burning fermentation. Naturally achieved 17 per cent alcohol without fortification, unique and meant for chocolate and cheese. “And a good cigar.” Less or more 25 euro retail or 19 ex-cellar or lets say $75-80 Canadian. Smells just like a Cherry Blossom, from the tree and out of the candy box. Sweet, bitter, drying and hot. An expensive acquired taste. Will drink for decades. Drink 2016-2046.  Tasted September 2016

Novaia Recioto Della Valpolicella DOCG 2013

From the oldest parcels in the oldest vineyard at La Novaia, the same process of the Amarone, using more ripe grapes, with an extended drying time to concentrate the juice. Fermentation arrested with cold temperature, registers 13.5 abv and spent one year in barrel. If it doesn’t happen the wine is filtered but that’s rarely needed. Full on black cherry syrup, runny raspberry confiture, sweet fennel tea and Chambord. Sweet but not milkshake thick. Great red chalky, spring maple bleed. A good Recioto ooze. Drink 2016-2026.  Tasted September 2016

Santa Sofia Recioto Della Valpolicella Classico DOC 2009

Same make-up as the Gioé Amarone, aged in Frenck oak for 14 months, plus 12 months in bottle. “A niche product that is hard to transmit its importance.” Of course no sugar adjustment, so to maximize the natural design, the fermentation is arrested naturally when the alcohol number is breached. Here at 14.5, higher on the Recioto scale but stlll well below the level of fortified. A balanced effort with acidity, tannin, bitters, tonic and plum essence sweetness. Dries out at then end with a pasty finish like salumi. Drink 2017-2028.  Tasted September 2016

Valentina Cubi Recioto Della Valpolicella Classico DOC Meliloto 2000

At 14.5 per cent and not produced every year, after this 2000 again in 2003 and 2010. Vanilla bean and ground espresso, cherry ooze or confiture. Dark chocolate, mint and orange zest. There is your pairing. Drink 2016-2026.  Tasted September 2016

Vignetti Di Ettore Recioto Della Valpolicella Classico DOCG 2013

Alcohol equitable to weight, acidity buoyant, dry extract elevated and residual sugar well-adjusted. Here we have typical and rich, balanced and ephemeral Recioto. What it needs to be. Drink 2016-2025.  Tasted September 2016

Zonin Recioto Di Gambellara Classico DOCG Il Giangio 2011

A 100 per cent garganega, aged in tonneaux, 24-36 months. “The typicity of this soil in garganega,” volcanic but dark basalt, apricot and pineapple with a minor herbal note and menthol cool, very sweet on the palate. Tart and sour, very pineapple, oil and mineral by basalt, not sticky but a salve, specific to Gambellara. There are 10-12 producers who make this wine (out of the 15-20 in the appellation). A very specific dessert wine. A 12-13 g/L RS number which seems impossible. Drink 2016-2025.  Tasted September 2016

Good to go!

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Memories of Verona

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Tales of the Bardolino, Custoza and Lugana

Pizza, Pane, Passione – Saporé Downtown, Verona

A year goes by so fast. In October of 2017 there was this inquisitive week of immersion probing around much of Lago di Garda’s perimeter. The tour involved disinterred soils, precocious vines and the promising vendibility out of several important northern Italian DOCs. The grand excursion was advertised to centre around the avant-garde collection of Rosé wines assembled under the auspices of Chiaretto. For the most part it was and in a report published not too long ago I wrote about the extolled virtues of Bardolino and Valtènesi Rosato.

Related – Garda’s Chiaretto success

There was much more to that 2017 trip than mere pale pink deliciousness. There was the beauty, purity and honesty of Corvina-based Bardolino DOC reds; Classico and Superiore. There was more. There were morainic and argilleux whites; Custoza and Lugana, with clonal variants and an array of varietals carrying and sharing the load. The trebbiano of varying biotype degrees; di lugana, di toscana, castelli romani and the homegrown turbiana. Then there are considerations involving garganega (marco bona), fernanda (cortese di gavi), and trebbianello (tokay friulano). Here are 64 tasting notes of Bardolino, Custoza and Lugana based wines tasted one year ago save for two stumbled happily upon at Vino al Vino in Firenze. Some of these wines were produced in adherence to the local DOCs and others well, not exactly so.

Hostaria Wine Festival, Verona

Bardolino

Bardolino’s collinare morenico, limestone and marine fossil soils were carved out more than 100 million years ago on the eastern shore of Lago di Garda. The 80 kilometre long Veneto wine route of the Bardolino production zone sits in a morainic area on argiloso (clay) soils around the eastern and southern shores of Garda, on flats and up to the hills and plateaus above the lake. From Bardolino to the hills of Costermano the corvina path descends to Garda and Torri del Benaco. Back in Bardolino it climbs to Cavaion Veronese, Affi, Caprino Veronese and Rivoli Veronese, from where it leads to Monte Baldo. The wine route follows to Pastrengo, Castelnuovo del Garda and Lazise in the south, leading to Peschiera del Garda and Valeggio sul Mincio and ending in the villages of Sommacampagna, Sona and Bussolengo.

A typical Bardolino blend is corvina (70 per cent), with addendum by rondinella and molinara. Bardolino is now approved to hold a maximum 95 per cent corvina, increased from 80. Supporting rondinella must be included at a minimum five per cent and up to a maximum of 40, up from 15. Other varieties allowed to be cultivated in the area can be used for a maximum of 20 per cent and with a 10 per cent limit for each variety, except for molinara, allowed up to a maximum of 15 per cent.

The Bard of Bardolino Angelo Perreti

Simply put it is the crisp acidity and fine, light tannins of corvina that lend Bardolino its imminently drinkable amiability. The vines benefit from a Mediterranean climate, with warm summers and mild to cool winters. Lake Garda lowers the diurnal temperature range of the area while the Dolomite mountains protect from winter freezes and provide cold winds during the warm summer months. There are 2700 hectares under vine, 100 producers and 17 million annual bottles produced.

The DOC was created in 1968 and now that Chiaretto has been separated with its own distinction, next up is to recognize the frazioni, sub-zones that dig deeper, into the micro-climates of La Rocca, Montebaldo and Sommacampagna. La Rocca represents the ancient Bardolino district. Thanks to its biodiversity Montebaldo stands for the foothill area known as the botanic garden of Europe. Sommacampagna accounts for the southern Bardolino hills. Look for these menzioni geografiche on labels of Bardolino coming soon.

Albino Piona Bardolino DOC 2016, Veneto, Italy (528646, $16.95, WineAlign)

Albino Piona’s corvina based Bardolino comes from a wild ferment and the lowest of fermentation temperatures. It’s all spice, sage and garriga with the classic red fruits beneath, subtle in a pinot nero way, not your typical Bardolino but a deserving winner of awards. This takes the presence to a whole new level. Reeks of fresh spring flowers, lilac and then roses. Drink 2017-2021.  Tasted twice, October 2017 and March 2018

Albino Piona Bardolino DOC 2013, Veneto, Italy (528646, $16.95, WineAlign)

The 2013 is perhaps a child of the very atypical vintage, with certainly a note of botrytis because saffron is once again a part of the mix. This is not just reserved for white wines and it’s a clean botrytis, remarkable, spicing up quince paste swirled with a light white fig. Once again so cool. Drink 2017-2019.  Tasted October 2017

Albino Piona Bardolino Superiore DOC “SP” 2013, Veneto, Italy (WineryWineAlign)

The morainic area south of Lake Garda is where Piona’s corvina and rondinella finds it top expression. This special cuvée is so very cherry, with white fig again, not so much the saffron but yes into the mushroom and even a developing truffle. Lovely. Drink 2017-2018.  Tasted October 2017

Albino Piona Bardolino Superiore DOC “SP” 2011, Veneto, Italy (WineryWineAlign)

The Bardolino SP 2011 is a wow red blend, coming in firm, intense, tart and with more clay (argileux) influence for sure. Takes the cherry and the porcine feel and turns it up to eleven. Serious structure this time around. Drink 2017-2020.  Tasted October 2017

Tortelli di Zucca alla moda del Gonzaga at Borsa Vallegio

Bergamini Bardolino DOC 2016, Veneto, Italy (WineryWineAlign)

Bardolino from Lasize, of 70 per cent corvina and 20 per cent molinara, fruity and firm. Quite aromatic, first potpourri dominated by dried roses, tart and all dark cherry flavours. Drink 2017-2019. Tasted October 2017  bergaminiaziendaagricola  Bergamini Azienda Agricola

Bergamini Bardolino Superiore DOC Colline Di Colà 2016, Veneto, Italy (WineryWineAlign)

Bardolino Superiore Colline di Colà is a construct from vines 50-plus years old, in 500L oak barrels for one year. The site is found in a small village near Lasize upon the hill of Colà. This is a form extricated, extracted and exercised with structure and takes Bardolino to a completely different place. Needs to settle in awhile. Drink 2018-2021.  Tasted October 2017

Bergamini Corvina Veronese Vigneto Monte Casa 2011, Veneto, Italy (WineryWineAlign)

Vigneto Monte Casa is only produced in the best vintages and its a corvina blessed of perfume and spice. Half of the juice not used for Chiaretto is further fermented without sulphites, with seeds and stems, then led through malo and put into big barrels. Remarkable wine. So cool. Exactly how to take the vines of Bardolino to another level. Drink 2017-2022.  Tasted October 2017

Bigagnoli Alias Rosato Veronese IGT 2016, Veneto, Italy (WineryWineAlign)

Alias Rosato didn’t pass the panel so not labeled Chiaretto because the panel said it smelled like onion skin. I don’t really get it. It may not be the most typical Chiaretto but really? Tangy and intense. Drink 2017-2018.  Tasted October 2017

Bigagnoli Bardolino DOC 2016, Veneto, Italy (WineryWineAlign)

Alessio Bignanoli’s one man band Bardolino is true blue, black and red cherry fruity, deep and intense, bottled under a screwcap with a pillow membrane, to allow a micro-oxygenation, to simulate cork. This is quite typical in blend only, of 75 per cent corvina plus rondinella and molinara. A bit reductive without surprise and with plenty of peppery spice. Again, not shocking. Drink 2017-2019.  Tasted October 2017

Bigagnoli Bardolino DOC 2015, Veneto, Italy (WineryWineAlign)

Bardolino 2015 has cherry cola, ribena and black currant while the early reductiveness has melted away. The florals have emerged and the time in bottle under screwcap has released the fun. It’s dancing now. Drink 2017-2019.  Tasted October 2017

Bigagnoli Scrum 2015, Veneto, Italy (WineryWineAlign)

Scrum 2015 is a blend of new teams, corvina (80 per cent) and roseleta. Cool savoury syrup which mixes the black cherry into the ribena, harvested in November, the grapes dried directly on the plants. Even in 2017 despite the heat Alessio will harvest late November because of a technique known as “Sciaccia” a pinching technique that allows desiccation without further development of sugar and ripeness. One of the more umami-singular wines in the region, to be very, very sure. Drink 2019-2022.  Tasted October 2017

Cantina Castelnuovo Del Garda Bardolino Classico DOC Ca’ Vegar 2016, Veneto, Italy (WineryWineAlign)

“Ca’ Vegar” is a blend of corvina (80 per cent), rondinella (15) and molinara (5) for a lactic, sour, “for local people to combine with fat fish from the lake,” Bardolino. With a chill. So composed, contrived and uninteresting. Chaptalized and acidified. Drink 2017-2019.  Tasted October 2017   cantinacastelnuovo  @BoscodelGalCantina Castelnuovo del Garda

Cantina Di Custoza Bardolino DOC 2016, Veneto, Italy (WineryWineAlign)

Bardolino 2016 is full-bodied and fruity, juicy, pushed by 6 g/L RS. Drink 2017-2018.  Tasted October 2017

Cantina Di Negrar Bardolino Classico DOC 2016, Veneto, Italy (AgentWineAlign)

The traditional blend of corvina, rondinella and molinara sees seven days of maceration transforming into a colour still stuck in the past, mired in recent antiquity, as is the sugar. There are 900,000 bottles made in this reductive, vinous to the nth degree, currants on steroids style. Needs a great chill, acids are acids, like acid verité. A Black cherry corvina, tart and angular. Massive vat of Bardolino corrected into correctness. Drink 2017-2019.  Tasted October 2017   cantina_valpolicella_negrar  noble_estates  @CantinaNegrar@Noble_Estates@CantinaValpolicellaNegrar@NobleEstates

Cantine Tinazzi Bardolino DOC 2015, Veneto, Italy (WineryWineAlign)

The blend is 70 per cent corvina, (15) molinara, (10) rondinella and (5) rosara (a clone of rondinella). Vinous again, there is no separation here from a certain style of Valpolicella, of sour (dark black) cherry, balsamic and it really reeks of fennel and spice from more than generous wood. Green, herbal and minty and a bit sweetly syrupy. Drink 2017-2019.  Tasted October 2017  cantine.tinazzi  @CantineTinazziCantine Tinazzi

Casaretti Corvina Rosato 2016, Veneto, Italy (WineryWineAlign)

Corvina Rosato is apposite to Chiaretto, a smaller production, from only corvina a vineyard, added by 10 months in tonneaux with battonage and bottled in September. Weighty at 14 per cent alcohol, again reductive but not overly so, creamy from lees stirring, round, fruity and full on texture. Almost unusual but it works somehow, like deconstructed cherry pie. Drink 2017-2019.  Tasted October 2017   stefano_rossi  Azienda Agricola Casaretti

Lago di Garda wildlife

Casaretti La Nogara 2016, Veneto, Italy (WineryWineAlign)

La Nogara is the name of the pergola trained vineyard of 15 year-old vines raised to corvina, rondinella, molinara and sangiovese with some garganega co-planted in. Low-yields even more so in this vintage in a place of low humidity and the oh-so necessary diurnal fluctuations for acid-fruit relationships. Again as per the house style so bloody reductive, tart, of rusty-red cherries, charcuterie and lots of furthered red fruit. Needs air and/or time. Really good acidity. Needs another year for the tonic to settle in. Drink 2018-2022.  Tasted October 2017

Casaretti La Nogara 2015, Veneto, Italy (WineryWineAlign)

La Nogara 2015 is the first vintage without Bardolino on the front label, equipped with more red fruit freshness, elegance and for the first time, no reduction. Tangy without being acetic or sour, this is a beautifully rendered wine from a very warm, vintage. Drink 2017-2020.  Tasted October 2017

Casaretti La Nogara 2014, Veneto, Italy (WineryWineAlign)

La Nogara 2014 is the most curative tonic and spinning red fruit blend of the three in the mini-vertical. It has some reserved (15-20) per cent juice from 2013 mixed in. In this region there is simply no one else who does this and perhaps this is why in 2015 he moves away (or in a sense loses) the Bardolino designation. Nor does he care. Drink 2017-2018.  Tasted October 2017

Casaretti Bardolino Classico Olte Longhe 2015, Veneto, Italy (WineryWineAlign)

Olte Longhe spent one year in 20 hL oak barrel and is now also a year in bottle. Lots of fruit on the palate, cherry pie all over accented by the Bardolino spice of life. It’s a wine of joie de vivre and really concentrated. This is just lovely, like Chianti Classico Riserva but from an alternate limestone universe. Here the house follows local law at an 80/20 mix but will in the future be 100 per cent corvina. Just the name of the vineyard “Olte Longhe … or perhaps Alte Langhe? Drink 2017-2021.  Tasted October 2017

Gentili Bardolino Classico DOC 2016, Veneto, Italy (WineryWineAlign)

The blend is 80 per cent corvina with 10 each sangiovese and rondinella, picked later, for body and for structure. Spent 12 days maceration on skins, “this is an Italian red wine” so more than one year of aging in the winery. Steel tank housed but in 2017 they will be blended with some wood aged fruit. Darker fruit but very Bardolino. There is nothing shocking here. Drink 2018-2021.  Tasted October 2017   Azienda agricola Gentili

Il Pignetto Bardolino DOC 2016, Veneto, Italy (WineryWineAlign)

Bardolino with no molinara and up to 10 per cent sangiovese. Again a wine of major fruit with a bit more dark berry and no barrel thatwill develop some spice in place of the fruit. This is a bit oxidative so it will also gain a concrete feel with time. A very soft expression. Drink 2017-2018.  Tasted October 2017    ilpignetto  Cantina Il Pignetto

Le Fraghe Bardolino DOC 2016, Veneto, Italy (Agent, $23.95, WineAlign)

In Matilde Poggi’s Bardolino the wild strawberries leap, hop, bound and shout. It’s uncanny, this Fraghe character. Here, out of light, bright and breathe easy corvina with (20 per cent rondinella) but a grip, not firm, but just a 10 day maceration for a minor, stainless steel fresh introduction with only a few microbes of tannin. Wild strawberry in a glass. Simply so effective and so honest. Drink 2017-2020.  Tasted October 2017

Le Fraghe Bardolino DOC 2015, Veneto, Italy (Agent, WineAlign)

Again, of course, the wild strawberry but there is a curative, lovely dusty and now also into raspberry reserve, like CCR or Rioja but cleaner, no wood, perfectly developed. Riper and the cherry to chocolate note that has developed is corvina, riper 2015 and Le Fraghe. How could you not want to drink a shed full of this juice. Two years exact past vintage is simply perfect for Matilde’s wines. They are so precocious in their wisdom. Can’t wait for 2017. Drink 2017-2020.  Tasted October 2017

Le Fraghe Bardolino Classico DOC Bol Grande 2015, Veneto, Italy (Agent, $31.95, WineAlign)

Brol as in “clos,” a wall with stones, from a vineyard re-planted in 2000. Matilde Poggi began this process of separating the fruit beginning in 2011, of 80 per cent corvina and 20 rondinella, a stainless steel ferment, followed by one year in 42 hL botti. Less stones, still in the Classico area, at the base of the mountain (Moscal). You won’t see this on her label (from a soon to be appellation made with Ripasso and Appassimento method wines), close to the lake. The thread does not stray from the base and necessary Le Fraghe concept, from freshness and the wild strawberry into the cherry, now plus a hint of chocolate extract. There is an extra layer of soil-given tart, curative and even a minor grilled meaty flesh note and herbs. Certainly more tannin, structure and dare I say it for Matilde, seriousness and complexity. Drink 2017-2022.  Tasted October 2017

Le Fraghe Bardolino Classico DOC Bol Grande 2012, Veneto, Italy (Agent, $31.95, WineAlign)

Brol Grande 2012 is so similar to 2015 and while warmer, there is even more firmness and structure. Still the comparisons are there, in wild strawberry, cherry and the ubiquitous chocolate. Has softened and found its ideal secondary stage. Drink 2017-2019.  Tasted October 2017

Le Fraghe Rondinella Veneto IGT Chelidon 2015, Veneto, Italy (AgentWineAlign)

Rondinella, the varietal red and the bird chelidon, from the ancient Greek, a swallow. First made in 2010, because there was extra, and a star was born, but only in the better years. Stainless steel fermentation but one year in large oak barrels. Not as fragrant as corvina, later harvested, not always the ripest varietal but ’15 is not a problem this way. Yet this does not strike as openly free and wild. It is fresh however and she (Matilde Poggi) is perhaps the only varietal producer of rondinella. It is as she says “esile,” not exactly elegant but more like “delicate.” The handsome varietal red, but yes, the delicate one. Not the most complex red in the book but so readable. A bit of cherry-chocolate-coffee, but not shaken or mocha. You can drink it three to four years on, with mineral emerging, but don’t get too serious about it. Drink 2017-2020.  Tasted October 2017

Le Ginestre Bardolino Classico DOC 2016, Veneto, Italy (WineryWineAlign)

From Macro Ruffato here is Bardolino Classico composed by corvina, corvinone and rondinella, in the classic, endemic, indigenous, autochthonous way. Dusty, rusty, sour cherry, very much in the zesty, honest way that proper Chianti Classico and Langhe will be. Really note the red bled vein of white limestone. Really honest Bardolino. Very solid. Drink 2017-2020.  Tasted October 2017   leginestrewine    Marco Ruffato

Le Morette Bardolino Classico DOC 2016, Veneto, Italy (WineryWineAlign)

Can’t recall any Bardolino nosing so much like bell pepper as this, perhaps with the lowest number from corvina, only 65 per cent. Gets to black cherry so it’s still residing on the riper hung side and with some ious firmness. Finishes in syrup of full on tang. Drink 2017-2018.  Tasted October 2017

Poggio Delle Grazie Bardolino DOC 2016, Veneto, Italy (Winery, WineAlign)

From Castelnuovo del Garda, Poggio alla Grazie is the child of Stefano and Massimo Brutti. Bardolino 2016 is composed of 80 per cent corvina and 20 rondinella, filtered for no sediment and so similar in (the winery’s Chiaretto) vein, leaving off from strawberry and into sour red cherry, tart and spirited. This is the unadulterated sapid and bloody delicious Bardolino, as if in a world before these great endemic grapes were messed with. This is how it should be made. This is what Bardolino is supposed to be. It’s like plasma for the red wine drinking soul. There are 10,000 bottles made. Drink 2018-2020. Tasted twice, October 2017 and January 2018  poggiodellegrazie  winerypoggodellegrazie  Poggio delle Grazie – ufficial page  Elisabetta Panetto  Massimo Brutti

Sorsei Bardolino Chiaretto Spumante DOC, Veneto, Italy (WineryWineAlign)

Bardolino Chiaretto Spumante is a quieter, reserved, less ostentatious sparkling, of increased berry fruit flavours, more like Chiaretto in expectation and with some character and nuance. Nicely composed. Drink 2017-2018.  Tasted October 2017  cristiana.bettili  @cristianacollection

Tenuta La Presa Bardolino DOC Baldovino 2016, Veneto, Italy (WineryWineAlign)

Corvina makes up 70 per cent with rondinella (20) and molinara plus sangiovese (10). From the Caprino Veronese and Località La Presa. Just another textbook, clinical, stainless steel, red fruit, orange skin and basic fruity Bardolino. It’s perfect in every way; ripe, juicy, risk-free, clean and tangy. Dictionary entry. Drink 2017-2019.  Tasted October 2017  tenutalapresa    Tenuta La Presa

Valetti Bardolino Chiaretto Spumante DOC, Veneto, Italy (Winery, WineAlign)

The Chiaretto Spumante is charmat method, no dosage, grape juice added of the same must from the same wine in tank to create the second fermentation. There are 6,000 bottles made and it’s actually quite a textured Spumante. I think it seems sweeter than it really is because of the layers of juiciness, created by the added juice, not sugar, so it’s quite naturally composed as a result. A bit of a pink lemonade and tonic, if you will. Drink 2017-2018.  Tasted October 2017  valetticantina  @CantinaValettiAzienda vinicola Valetti Luigi srl

Valetti Bardolino Classico DOC 2016, Veneto, Italy (Winery, WineAlign)

Echoing the thoughts of patriarch and grandfather Angelo, the new generation tells us that “wine has to be destroyed. How else could we make more wine? Agriculture is the only system where you have to destroy something in order to preserve tradition.” And so their Bardolino Classico 2016 made from 60 per cent corvina, (30) rondinella and (10) sangiovese gets neither more basic nor more technically sound than this. It messes neither with tradition nor risk. It is the everyman Bardolino. Drink 2017-2018.  Tasted October 2017

Valetti Bardolino Classico Superiore DOC 2015, Veneto, Italy (Winery, WineAlign)

Bardolino Classico Superiore 2015 repeats the same mix, of 60 corvina, 30 rondinella and 10 sangiovese, aged for one year in any vessel of choosing (according to rule), in this case 6-8 months of that time in half new/half new barriques. The same wine though with spice, vanilla and an exaggeration of vinous fruit flavours. It’s not a departure and will offend no one, said everyone. Drink 2017-2019.  Tasted October 2017

Villa Cordevigo

Villabella Villa Cordevigo Bardolino Classico DOC Biologico 2015, Veneto, Italy (AgentWineAlign)

The organic Bardolino blend is 70 per cent corvina, (20) rondinella and (10) corvinone in skin contact for 10 days, no oak and all stainless steel. Once again there is a stylistic adjustment, away from marmalade wines by Bardolino and into preserved freshness, parallel to the Chiaretto model but more so in going back to (more than 100 years ago) to roots. The ideal shares an affinity with pinot noir, or Beaujolais, so let’s say, “Bardolino Villages.” You can sense it, smell it and taste it, with some vinous flavours, from vineyards just in from of the villa. The nose is indeed red fruits with spices. What is special is the length, long and consistently true. Drink 2017-2019.  Tasted October 2017   vignetivillabella  villacordevigo  stemwinegroup  @VillaCordevigo  @StemWineGroup  @VignetiVillabella  @stemwine 

Lunch at Villa Cordevigo

Villabella Bardolino Classico DOC Vigna Morlongo Anniversario Trentanni 2013, Veneto, Italy (AgentWineAlign)

The concept means more complexity and less fruit (with age apparent evolution) and also more spice. You also note plenty of boxwood, fennel and liquorice. Really mild tannins, some dried fruit and chocolate shavings dusted with black pepper and black olive. A very Mediterranean wine, with a true sense of garriga tempered by a just slightly sour (or lime-soil) edge. Drink 2017-2018.  Tasted October 2017

Villa Calicantus Bardolino Superiore DOC 2015, Veneto, Italy (Agent, WineAlign)

From Daniele Delaini’s biodymamic farm on the moranic hill above Bardolino and Lazise, higher up than Cavaion, in Calmasino. His Bardolino Superiore emits more citrus than the “alleged” Rosé and still there is this impossibility of fun funky, oxidative and earthy attitude. It’s corvina with sangiovese and again is a purely, expressly and unmitigated take on what the land insists on giving. There are many who would argue the opposite but like the listening and attentive author who allows the stories to come, Delaini is the winemaker equivalent. The last 100 years of winemaking have stolen away the voice of the earth and here it reclaims its territory. For better or for worse. Drink 2017-2019.  Tasted October 2017  villacalicantus  thelivingvine    @TheLivingVine  @VillaCalicantus  The Living Vine inc.

Villa Calicantus Bardolino Superiore Avresir DOC 2013, Veneto, Italy (Agent, WineAlign)

Avresir means Riserva and Daniele Delaini makes his from 20 year old vines. “All my thinking is about this wine. I don’t sleep with this wine.” It’s his come back to the old way of making Bardolino, bot just the wine but the way of being. This is corvina, when there was more thinking about the vineyard and less about the wine.” It begins with lower yields and so 1600 plants produce 1700 bottles. Fermentation is with stems but not pressed with skins but again it begins in the filed where vines are grown with balance. This is fucking beautiful red wine and as the man himself explains, “you are the interpreter of the vines.” Such structure and tannin is understood to be exacting and righteous. This is that comparison we like to say is Burgundian, or at least its the reference point. Drink 2019-2027.  Tasted October 2017

Villa Calicantus Bardolino Superiore Avresir DOC 2014, Veneto, Italy (Agent, WineAlign)

Bardolino Superiore Avresir 2014 again shows the difference of vintage as the rains fell in great abundance with plenty of warmth but certainly not a matter of heat. The reduced quantity is one thing and while there is more perfume and liqueur there is certainly a softening os structure. It’s terrific corvina once again and while it may be splitting hairs when comparing this to 2013, the leanness is noticeable. Still a lovely wine to speak on behalf of Bardolino lands. Drink 2018-2024.  Tasted October 2017

Custoza

The Custoza DOC covers the municipalities of Sommacampagna, Sona, Valeggio sul Mincio, Villafranca di Verona and Bussolengo. Custoza is unique because it is not characterized by a prevailing vine variety, but it is based on other than the local varieties in addition to a traditional blend of grapes including garganega, trebbianello and bianca fernanda. The area is historically famous for having been the site of the First Battle of Custoza fought on July 24 and 25, 1848 during the First Italian War of Independence between the armies of the Austrian Empire and the Kingdom of Sardinia.

Albino Piona Bianco Di Custoza DOC 2016, Veneto, Italy (SAQ 12469383, $19.50, WineAlign)

Garganega leads at 40 per cent, with two local clones, fernanda (cortese di gavi) and trebbianello (tokay friulano). Just a minor amount of chardonnay and two others minor grapes join the fray. This is the image and feel of the local white from Custoza, a wine that really brings the glycerin on top of the increased aromatics, young and fresh. The texture is elevated and this is what mostly gives the pleasure. Drink 2017-2019.  Tasted October 2017  sil_pio  lesvinsdupre    @lesvinsdupre@AlbinoPionaMonica Piona@lesvinsdupre

Albino Piona Bianco Di Custoza DOC 2015, Veneto, Italy (SAQ 12469383, $18.90, WineAlign)

The 2015 white blend carries even more glycerin but with a different, almost porcine aromatic waft, plus some vegetal preserve and a squeeze of persevered lemon. Drink 2017-2018.  Tasted October 2017

Albino Piona Bianco Di Custoza DOC 2014, Veneto, Italy (SAQ 12469383, $18.90, WineAlign)

This Custoza blend has entered stage two with great sapid-saline-mineral-salty notes, smoky, flinty and with great acidity. Of all the vintages in this recent vertical it is the one that brings apricot, pith, lemon, pear and riesling character. Still a bit of CO2 residual here as well. Just bloody delicious. Drink 2017-2020.  Tasted October 2017

Albino Piona Bianco Di Custoza DOC 2013, Veneto, Italy (SAQ 12469383, $19.50, WineAlign)

A year described by winemaker Silvio Piona as a stranieri, with botrytis, certainly different, funky and with the glück of an alternate universe vintage. Chamomile tea and something inexplicable. “I told you when I came I was a stranger” insists this varietal mix. The stranger song. Drink 2017-2018. Tasted October 2017

Albino Piona Custoza Superiore DOC “SP” 2013, Veneto, Italy (WineryWineAlign)

SP is the experiment Custoza, more aromatic even than the “normale” but again in a difficult way to explain,. It’s vegetal, nosing weird lemon, so much saffron (zafferano) that it’s uncanny really and is what graces the umami with an increased sapidity. Grassy too, but in the end its risotto milanese, with linear, lean and tart acidity, then herbs (basil and tarragon), from a cool, heavy clay site. Preserved lime in the end. Not so standard but very clean. Drink 2017-2020.  Tasted October 2017

Albino Piona Custoza Superiore DOC “SP” 2011, Veneto, Italy (WineryWineAlign)

The SP 2011 is like a repeat of the 2013, noted by even more hyperbole from the botrytis-affected sweet viscosity and the saffron. Here in Custoza Bianco texture meets umami, glycerin abides but it’s also somehow lean and direct. Such a weird and beautiful dichotomy, then turning herbal and with lime. A bit oxidative at this point but so very clean. Drink 2017-2019.  Tasted October 2017

Albino Piona Custoza Superiore DOC Campo del Selese 2013, Veneto, Italy (WineryWineAlign)

Campo del Selese delivers even more saffron, exaggerated still and those balmy herbs are joined now with a minor note of funghi. Would like to think of freshness but it’s differences set it away from these thoughts. More of a glacial till site changes the physiology and again, there is the definite presence of botrytis. What does it smell like in a dry white? Well, like this of course. Drink 2017-2019.  Tasted October 2017

Albino Piona Custoza Superiore DOC Campo del Selese 2012, Veneto, Italy (WineryWineAlign)

Campo del Selese 2012 is yet another matter of that omnipresent Custoza saffron again but much less this time around, with more flinty, smoky and tight, taut, tart, riesling lines. This really wraps around the tongue like a twist-tie and I am really impressed by the ageing of this particular vintage. Drink 2017-2020.  Tasted October 2017

Albino Piona Custoza DOC Campo del Selese 1999, Veneto, Italy (WineryWineAlign)

It’s one of the Veneto’s unknown, this wonderment about Custoza and its ability to age. Well if Campo del Selese 1999 is any indication, the possibilities are boundless. Yes it’s alive, from a time before the Superiore designation, fading but quite spirited somehow, but it has lost the saffron (assuming it was once there). Now in a green day, with preserved lemon, bitter pith and tonic but what it has preserved is really mushroom melding into umami protein. Tré cool, like the drummer. Drink 2017-2018.  Tasted October 2017

Albino Piona Gran Cuvée Metodo Classico 2009, Veneto, Italy (WineryWineAlign)

Gran Cuvée Metodo Classico 2009 is corvina (70 per cent) plus (30) garganega e trebbiano (toscana). It’s a dry, no dosage brut zero with so much spice, crazy ginger, dry as the desert, a bit of concrete, very intense. Not so much citrus though despite the intensity, a bit porcine as well and chewy in a way. It grows on you. Spent 66 months on the lees and is now just a wave of toast with the spices so much more in control. Drink 2017-2021.  Tasted October 2017

Cantina Di Custoza Custoza DOC Vino Biologico Terre In Fiore 2016, Veneto, Italy (WineryWineAlign)

Custoza must include the three mandatory grapes; garganega, cortese and trebbiano di lugana (tokay), found here along with trebbiano di toscana, plus manzini and chardonnay, you know, for aromatics. Quite metallic, green, balmy, lean but with a sweet edge. Quite commercial. Drink 2017-2018.  Tasted October 2017  @cantina.custoza

Cantina Di Custoza Custoza DOC 2016, Veneto, Italy (WineryWineAlign)

Custoza DOC 2016 is of a similar profile but further into texture and mouthfeel, less lean and green and also less apparently buoyed by sugar. Rounder and better sign, sealed and zipped seals. Drink 2017-2019.  Tasted October 2017

Cantina Di Custoza Custoza DOC Le Noce 2016, Veneto, Italy (WineryWineAlign)

Custoza Le Noce arrives with more of a cortese/manzoni injection, which shows up not in florals but on the palate as a creamy salve, leesy but the acidity is greater. Better wine but still much of the same. Variations on one consistent theme. Drink 2017-2018.  Tasted October 2017

Il Pignetto Custoza DOC 2016, Veneto, Italy (WineryWineAlign)

Il Pignetto’s Custoza is garganega (40 cent), trrebiano di toscana, cortese and tokay. Here is your Veneto aperitif, easy drinking white blend, defining as an appellative blend of Custoza. An example to make great use of were the category really defined in the hands of some marketing caché. Drink 2017-2018.  Tasted October 2017

Il Pignetto Custoza ‘218’ 2015, Veneto, Italy (WineryWineAlign)

This late harvest Custoza is not made in botrytis affected years, shows off good gassy petrol and complex interest. Not so much residual sugar, down the middle at 13 per cent alcohol, very dry and hissing with mineral, tang. A unique white from which there was no need to arrest fermentation. It is surprisingly a great and impossible wine. Drink 2017-2020.  Tasted October 2017

Le Fraghe Garganega Camporengo Veneto IGT 2016, Veneto, Italy (AgentWineAlign)

Camporengo is name of the vineyard, poured from magnum, of 100 per cent garganega. In Bardolino it used to be co-planted with the red grapes and is the latest to pick, mashed very cold to prevent oxidation. Raised only and all in stainless, whole bunch pressed, from morainic, mixed glacial stony soil between Lago di Garda and the Adige Valley, at 150m. The corporeal textured garganega, like crushed stones, salty and tannic, molto sale. Drink 2017-2020.  Tasted October 2017   #lefraghe  thevineagency  #matildepoggi    @TheVine_RobGroh   Le Fraghe  Matilde Poggi  @thevineto

Le Fraghe Garganega Camporengo Veneto IGT 2015, Veneto, Italy (AgentWineAlign)

Camporengo is the vineyard planted in 1992 and with just a year in bottle something in garganega multiplicity has emerged. It’s sesame reductive, with flinty sapidity, sulphur in minor yes but more the thing that happens with sémillon, as can happen with garganega. At crunchy too, so nearing a petrol moment. These would be ideal at three to four years of age, though not likely 7-10. Drink 2017-2020.  Tasted October 2017

Le Fraghe Garganega Camporengo Veneto IGT 2007, Veneto, Italy (AgentWineAlign)

Camporengo Garganega 2007 is from what was at the time 15 year-old fruit. A big role played by the screwcap closure, keeping it remarkably fresh, whereas cork bottles would be totally oxidized. So sémillon, gas and spirit, petrol, flint and truly struck from the stone. Just a touch of honey. So tasty and this was the first screwcap vintage. Doesn’t even need acidity, also thankful to the residual CO2 still there. Prepared for cork and bottled under screw. Drink 2017-2018.  Tasted October 2017

Lugana

Even if the production regulations allow for the presence of up to 10 per cent of complementary white varieties (as long as they are non-aromatic), nowadays the zone’s producers tend to make their Luganas exclusively from turbiana. Five different styles are permitted: standard Lugana (accounting for 90 per cent of the DOC’s wines), Superiore, Riserva, Vendemmia Tardiva (Late Harvest) and Spumante (Sparkling).

Una composizone unica di agrille che dona un’impronta inconfondibile al vino is the way in which the Consorzio Tutela Lugana DOC describes the wines produced with the uniqueness of turbiana at its core. The clay-based soils on a narrow spit at the southern end of lake Garda are what gives these fresh and aromatic whites their distinct flavour profile.

Bigagnoli I Bianco Veronese 2016, Veneto, Italy (WineryWineAlign)

I Bianco is composed of trebbiano di lugana and marco bona (garganega) grown only in the hills of Bardolino, Only three vineyards have this garganega clone and Alessio also blends in tokay (trebbianello), tokay friulano and very little castelli romani (a clone of trebbaino toscana). Lemon scented with exceptional acidity and waxy, perfect for fatty fish. Drink 2017-2018.  Tasted October 2017  bigagnoliwines  @bigagnoliwinesAlessio Bigagnoli

Cascina Maddalena Lugana DOC Capotesta 2016, Veneto, Italy (WineryWineAlign)

Capotesta is the head and the heartbeat for this soft, friable dust in the wind Lugana soil. Grape tannic, linear, direct, certainly lean and so very crisp. A clean, pure, no bells and whistles white involved and in it for all the right reasons. Drink 2018-2021.  Tasted February 2018   cascinamaddalena  @CascinaMaddalena

Cascina Maddalena Lugana DOC Clay 2014, Veneto, Italy (WineryWineAlign)

Extending the turbiana from Capotesta here we climb through much more texture, more expressive of this Lugana argilo and full Garda lake effect. The trace elements drawn up from this soil feel persistently apparent for inspirational infiltration. Yes it’s similar or even in closest kinship with the Capotesta as it should be because their is honesty, transparency and delicacy running through in soulful refrain. A textured chorus of plush extension opens up to allow a moment’s solo of a soprano’s dynamite intensity. So particular, finessed and Lugana instructive. Drink 2018-2023.  Tasted February 2018

Le Morette Lugana DOC Mandolara 2016, Veneto, Italy (WineryWineAlign)

This white is made from a distinctly separate variety, not a biotype of turbiana, not actually trebbiano di lugana but a grape special to the house. From high clay sites on the narrow strip of land on the southern shore of Lago di Garda. Makes for a round and plush white, with fresh herbs and lime in combination that brings terroir and varietal together. Shows good concentration from this grape whose uniqueness owes thanks to the estate’s clonal research and is simply classic for this place. Drink 2017-2019.  Tasted October 2017  lemorettelugana  @@lemorette.lugana

Le Morette Benedictus 2015, Veneto, Italy (WineryWineAlign)

Benedictus is Le Morette’s cru, 45 year-old vineyard turbiana, picked and stirred for one night in the maceration room. It’s a full-textured, clean and creamy white like perfectly clarified mellifluous honey finished in second passage French tonneaux. A flinty note celebrates a preserved reductive freshness and confirms the lovely feel. It’s almost a sémillon like character but there is so much body and really quite a lot of fruit. It’s ripe, juicy, a fruit cup mildly tinned and just great to drink. Will gain interest with a bit of age. Drink 2017-2022.  Tasted October 2017

Le Morette Lugana Riserva DOC 2015, Veneto, Italy (WineryWineAlign)

Le Morette’s Riserva is a story in typology of Lugana that began only a few years ago. A unique wine that by regulation can be released to market only two years after vintage. This is a winery selection, not one of vineyard. A wine that is used to express “the potential of the vineyard.” Here it is contiguous from Benedictus in flint and juicy spirit but with further concentration and also intensity. Not as delicate as Benedictus and perhaps a bit adorned but very much a causation for transformation into a more serious realm. If this is the necessity it must own it. And it does. Drink 2017-2023.  Tasted October 2017

Pizza, Pane, Passione – Saporé Downtown, Verona

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