There must be 50 ways to remember Amarone

Memories of Verona

Buona Pasqua to everyone in the Veneto, Verona and as the title of this article indicates, a very Happy Easter to our friends and producers in Valpolicella. My last visit to the area was in October 2018 for a sidestep away from a Lake Garda focused journey west of the Adige River. Two years earlier I spent a September 2016 week in Verona and the Valpolicella Valleys. After that trip I published all my notes on the DOCs; Valpolicella (inclusive of Classico and Superiore) and Valpolicella Ripasso. The fact of the matter is on that week-long tasting through corvina, corvinone, rondinella, molinara, croetine and oseleta I also sipped, swirled and assessed a number of Amarone della Valpolicella DOCG and Recioto della Valpolicella DOCG. In between those two Veronese excursions there was a July 2017 Collisioni experience in Piemonte and during that festival a Progetto Vino Masterclass showed and poured the wines of eight Famiglie dell’Amarone producers. It just seems every trip to northern Italy must include Amarone.

Related – Valpolicella, Ripasso Valpolicella

Villa Moron, Negrar

Those collective tasting notes never made it to print, that is until now. Following those 2016, 2017 and 2018 voyages to northern Italian regions I published a host of articles and many notes, but as with every immensely immersive media trip there is always unfinished business. Each and every travel return to Canada requires the day to day of real world work detail; tasting through VINTAGES releases, consignment, private order and potential to market wines, followed by editing and publishing those reviews; restaurant buying and staff education too; most gratifying is wine education, sharing regional wine experiences and gained knowledge with sommeliers, other journalists and peers. The rigours of home and work life don’t always allow for every travel stone to be unturned.

Related – Barbera d’Asti Del Monferrato E Nizza Monferrato

Verona, September 2016

What can be attacked by retrospective means are notebooks scribbled by design and computer folders layered, pages and files filled with thoughts left to await their eventual fruition, temporarily resigned to the arena of “the never too late.”  This kind of post on Godello always comes accompanied by a huge sense of gratitude to the regional facilitators, logistical magicians and dozens of producers who share their life’s work, engage in conversation and give so generously of their time. These are the 50 wines tasted three, four and five years ago. Forty one Amarone and nine Recioto surveyed, evaluated, admired and yet consigned in those times, resigned to drafts, now unburdened, released and published.

Amarone della Valpolicella DOCG

Bertani Amarone Della Valpolicella Classico DOCG 2013

“You can like it or not but this is what Bertani Amarone Classico is supposed to be,” the words of host Michaela at the historic estate founded in 1857. The first vintage was 1959. Made the same way today. “This is a medication wine,” no sorry, “meditation.” Again, points are credited for the lack of jam, the shortness of breath and the heavy shaken oak restraint. But once again the charm needs to be coaxed. There is undeniable structure to look decades forward and to read the tea leaves for its past. Perhaps a virtual walk through a forest will ensue. Perhaps. Drink 2019-2029.  Tasted September 2016

Bertani Amarone Della Valpolicella Valpantena DOCG 2013

A 30 day drying period instead of 50, quite short for the region. Aged in Slavonian oak barrels, an earlier developing, made to drink with food early in life kind of Amarone. Sour cherry and dark chocolate. Quite young but I can’t see it getting much more interesting than this. Made for a consumer that has never tried an Amarone before and wants a gateway entry. Clocks in at 15.5 per cent, certainly not jammy though you feel the density and the weight. Drink 2016-2020.  Tasted September 2016

Brigaldara Amarone Della Valpolicella Classico DOCG Casa Vecie 2011

“At thirty three years old (1986) I came back to the family farm. It was the best decision of my life,” says Stefano Cesari. “I like this business. In my time the problem was the market. Now it is the cost of soil. You need big investment.” More elegance driven into this dusty, dried red fruit Amarone than most, with some frutta di bosco and fragola secco, heat on the nose in a slightly volatile way (or acetic) but plenty of equality abounds. Plenty of fruit and savoury character equals it all out. In Valpolicella west facing vineyards bring stronger wines and in the east more elegance. CCR, (40/40/20). Two years in barriques and two in 25 HL casks. The chocolate comes late. At 16.4 per cent this strikes an accord. Drink 2019-2029.  Tasted July 2017

Alfredo Buglioni

Buglioni Il Lussurioso Amarone Della Valpolicella Classico Riserva DOCG 2011

Alfredo Buglioni’s Riserva 2011 is a case study of 25 per cent in 50 hL barrel in a Valpolicella that bridges the old and the new school of Amarone. It notes less confiture and dried fig, negative reduction, inducement and decreasing hyperbole, from concentration, of facets and tents getting on one page together and of sugar levels. Palates of the Amarone are rarely so alive, sparked and again, as per the thread run through this house, electric. The properties of chalky and tannic will churn this through a ten year development wheel. Drink 2019-2027.  Tasted September 2016 and October 2017

Ca’ La Bionda Amarone Della Valpolicella Classico DOCG 2011

The bright, freshest Amarone, light as it can possibly be, with smoky limestone and volcanic influence mixed with clay. If you can’t see the forests (minerals) for the trees (soils) than you won’t get this Amarone. “If I am home I don’t drink Amarone,” says Alessandro Castellani, but you just know he sneaks some sips in the cellar. There is cherry in softly crushed ways and the silky palate with nary a chocolate moment. Just a baby, fleshing quickly so just imagine the feel in another 18 months. Drink 2018-2027.  Tasted September 2016

Ca’ La Bionda Amarone Della Valpolicella Classico DOCG Vigneti Di Ravazzòl 2012

A blend of 70 per cent corvina, (20) corvinone and (10) rondinella plus molinara from the renowned stony clay-limestone hill Ravazzòl. The vines average 50-70 years of age and in 2012 the Amarone is a lithe 16 per cent alcohol with necessary and alter-ego balancing acidity. Ca’ La Bionda acidity, singular, arisen from the mineral terroir to rise above most of the Classico territory. A wine that already sets about to linger almost before the first sip is taken, lending credence to the contemplative and meditative Valpolicella ideal. Even when a wine is so powerful it can elicit serenity and calm. Drink 2018-2032.  Tasted September 2016

Ca’ La Bionda Amarone Della Valpolicella Classico DOCG Vigneti Di Ravazzòl 2011

Generally speaking the Ravazzòl blend is 70 per cent corvina, (20) corvinone and (10) rondinella plus molinara. The clay-limestone soil is unequivocally the thing that changes the wine and with time the emerge is all about more mineral and spice. Much older vines (minimum 50 years old) bring about an increased richness but also a more lifted brightness. “This is my idea of Amarone, traditional but unusual,” tells Alessandro Castellani. “We’ve invented nothing.” Sapidity, acidity, supple peppery schisty-like, syrah-esque spice. Again a bite but no scathe. “It’s difficult to make an Amarone that is powerful with drinkability. You need a good terroir.” Drink 2019-2029.  Tasted September 2016

Ca’ La Bionda Amarone Della Valpolicella Classico DOC Vigneti Di Ravazzòl 2008

Just bottled one month ago after eight years in wood (Botti Grandi) so despite the age its just a baby. The wood is still quite up front. Here the most floral though the palate is thick and compressed, spice of course, as in all the wines but somehow there is evidence of what you have come to expect, despite the youth. The confusion and the conundrum align to cause your brain to say “too young to really know anything.” This is the beauty of complexity in Alessandro Castellani’s Amarone, specifically from the clay-limestone hill that is Ravazzòl. Drink 2020-2030.  Tasted September 2016

Ca’ La Bionda Amarone Della Valpolicella Classico DOC Vigneti Di Ravazzòl 2004

Opened two hours earlier, a cool vintage slowly fast-forwarded to today’s elegance. Is it mature? Of sorts as it carries the soil in its blood and whiffs like it was intended to be though I personally find it extreme youthful. A slight (as it used to be) sweetness (6 g/L of RS) and there is tobacco smouldering in a cedar box. Still not quite opening yet, spending an hour with it (or more) would be ideal. Undefined red citrus, exotica, florals, finesse, balance and elegance. Though it may have once been or at least acted-seemed greener, it has made it to this pretty stage. An integrated beauty. Drink 2016-2026.  Tasted September 2016

Locanda 800

Ca’Rugate Amarone Della Valpolicella DOCG 2013

Sees 32 months in barrel, of course there is richness and some very bright fruit but what is remarkable is the transparency, the claret consistency and the relative thin (and thankfully so) veneer. Finding this quite mineral, full of soil tang and with the barrel program here all new it’s quite an impossibility. As in Ca’Rugate’s whites, the barrel adds spice and some smoulder, not thick, glycerin and caky texture. This is Amarone you can drink, even if it’s a bit of smoke and mirror talk but it’s really done in the right way and for all the right reasons. At 16 per cent it fools with great acumen. Same vintage twice and yes, truly consistent. Drink 2017-2025.  Tasted September 2016

Cantina Di Negrar Amarone Della Valpolicella Classico DOCG 2013

A massive mouthful of Amarone with more varieties of chocolate than thought possible confined to one sweet and savoury bottle. Rich, extracted, caky and oozing with that aforementioned chocolate swirling in the machine, lathered like warm ganache and oozing out of a flourless torte’s every pore. Everything you might expect from Amarone in the developing Valpolicella world. Drink 2019-2025.  Tasted September 2016

Cantine Negrar Domini Veneti Amarone Della Valpolicella Classico Superiore DOCG Verjago 2011

From grapes dried between five and six weeks, here the octane runs high, the sugars fully developed for a warm and generous Amarone. The spice cupboard is joined by tobacco and plenty of sweet Amaro bitters, with dusty espresso and a minimum 76 per cent chocolate all over the finish, still with massive tannin. A huge expression with an RS between seven and eight g/L. Drink 2018-2023.  Tasted September 2016

Cantine Negrar Domini Veneti Amarone Della Valpolicella Classico DOCG Vigneti Di Jago 2010

Now here, in my opinion, from a most excellent vintage, with more red fruit and less obvious splintering the freshness persists and the charm continues to draw emotive consideration. The impression brings some soil/terroir gifting, with aromas that suggest multi-stone (limestone and basalt) and freshness from clay. Though the sweetness seems elevated (an RS of 12 or more?) at least the red fruit, citrus expressed and thriving acidity is a match to the Amarone thing. Though massive again, with raging tannin, there is more honesty in this wine. Drink 2016-2022.  Tasted September 2016

Famiglia Pasqua Amarone Della Valpolicella Classico DOCG Villa Borghetti 2012

Comes in at 15 per cent, produced in Marano della Valpolicella, the drying process lasts up to four months (depending on the dates of harvest) for a 30-40 per cent loss of moisture into grape and sugars concentration. Sees 12 months in French barriques, is a fresher style of Amaraone, with quality red fruit but the flavours are directed by formula, cloyingly medicinal and acidified tart. Admittedly with its spice and its sweetness it loves the cheese and the dried fruit. Drink 2016-2019.  Tasted September 2016

Famiglia Pasqua Amarone Della Valpolicella Classico DOCG Mai Dire Mai 2010

Joint ventures between two families, a whopping 16.5 per cent, from corvina (65 per cent), corvinone (15), rondinella (10) and oseleta (10). The work of never say never, single-vineyard (Vignetti Montevegro val d’Illasi), up to four months appassimento, 44 days fermentation, mostly in new barriques for 24 months. The wood occupies the central square in the city centre, taking up residence with what seems to be exceptional fruit though its suppression hides what it might want to offer. Mocha chocolate big time, heat of the night and so much spice. Chalky clay dense and weighty. Intense Amarone. Cherries seeping in spirit water, over the top but for the right reasons where many would follow. Drink 2018-2022.  Tasted September 2016

In motion at Fidora

Fidora Amarone Della Valpolicella Classico DOCG Monte Tabor 2010

A massive mouthful of Amarone with a boozy effect to make it seem as though it is quite sweet when in fact it’s an Amarone of extreme relative acidity. The RS level is oddly, curiously and impossibly low at 2.0 g/L with balancing thanks to massive dry extract and fierce, competitive and autocratic tannins. Not to mention 36-42 months in barrel that may as well have been 48, or more. Where else have you ever tasted such a thing? Needs a few to many more years to find its way. Drink 2020-2032.  Tasted September 2016

Masi Serego Alighieri Amarone Della Valpolicella Classico Vaio Armaron 2011

The descendants of San Pietro. Single Vineyard from the Serego Alighieri Estate, 70 corvina, 20 rondinella and 10 molinara, only in the best vintages. Use of cherry wood, brings more oxidation, but it’s only employed for four months. 15.5, illusion of sweetness, 6-7 g/L RS.  Last tasted July 2017

The Vaio Amaron is both highly polished and heavily composed Amarone with history, tradition and the way it has always been exuding out of every appassimento pore. Sourced from the eponymous vineyard which lays claim “it seems” to the name itself, this is Masi’s most iconic Amarone. The not quite reached prime time fig-centric red to black fruit is bright and alive but do not be fooled. The depths of plum and marly earth are plumbed, mined and excavated for full bore corvina, rondinella and molinara heavy exercize. From what I have come to recognize as a most excellent Amarone vintage (even though it is way too young to even begin to appreciate) you had better pull out the Monte Veronese for this dangerous and formidable Veneto. Drink 2019-2034.  Tasted September 2016

Nicolis Amarone Della Valpolicella Classico DOCG 2010

A blend of 65 corvina, 20 rondinella, 10 croatina and 5 molinara with a bit of SO2 that needs air to release. The reduction is consistent with the fresher Valpolicellas. Old school, deep red fruit, really fleshy, more than the price is drinkable, this has so much in common with similarly weighted reds, like sonoma cabernet sauvignon, Chianti classico Gran Selezione and Rhône Gigondas. Interesting comparisons aside (and stylistically they are valid) this is a rich, concentrated, high glycerin Amarone with a warm, sweet finish. Orange fleshy, summer patio melon liqueur cocktail. Very consumer friendly for a Keg Steakhouse red. Drink 2016-2021.  Tasted September 2016

Nicolis Amarone Della Valpolicella DOC Ambrosan 2008

Tallying in at 16 per cent alcohol which is par for the Amarone course and a number completely normal for the 2008 vintage. While it may be a bruiser it has barely walked out of its toddler shoes and is indeed a corvina blend of deepest intent. The eight year mark is where the layering begins to unfold and a glimpse variegates right here in this glass. A thick one, with a naturally funky porcine cure, humid and ideal for slices of ham in all iterations. Also perfect for the cuisine of Chef Diego Donatelli at Locanda 800 in Negrar. Drink 2018-2029.  Tasted September 2016

Nicolis Amarone Della Valpolicella DOC Ambrosan 2007

Single vineyard, current vintage available, sold in the LCBO, 70 corvina, 20 rondinella, 10 croatina, first made in 1990 (the normale was first made in 1978). This combines the rich extraction and big barrel impart of the Ripasso into a fortified, layered and deeply compressed Amarone. Sweetness seems magnified. The bretty voltility is part of the party. A mix of sweet, saline and savoury, not yet umami and still so young because it’s thick and taut. Will be late in 2017 before anything changes. Drink 2018-2028.  Tasted September 2016

Novaia Amarone Della Valpolicella Classico DOCG Le Balze 2011

Bottled in March and will likely be released in December. Single-vineyard aged three years in (some new and mostly old) barrels. Vines were planted in 1996, so now just entering right into the proverbial wheelhouse of exceptionality. It will have up to another 10 years or so before those vines will likely succumb to the Mal d’este wood disease. Richer, softer, gentle and amenable especially to taste, but that acidity, power and tannin does not relent. The aging adds to the density, the clay in this vineyard adds to the power and all tolled this is bigger and with more layered brawn than the Corte Vaona. Two different slices of Amarone pie. This one with a big chocolate espresso finale. Drink 2019-2028.  Tasted September 2016

Salvaterra Amarone Della Valpolicella Classico DOC 2009

Plenty of oak, including American, on the nose with the gamut run in kernel, nut and smoke. With Monte Veronese cheese aged 18 and 24 months the savoury and herbal aspects are foiled with reigned in agreement. This is modernity to the extreme, like some equally forged or a cross between Gran Selezione and Barolo, firm, concentrated but not shaken. Still quite youthful. Drink 2017-2027.  Tasted September 2016

Salvaterra Amarone Della Valpolicella Classico DOC 2007

Seems typical of the vintage, softer, rich and quite getable though there is heat and the aromatics of distraction; menthol, clove, vanilla, lavender, fennel and even cola. How this reminds me of high octane California pinot noir I’m not sure but it does. So thoroughly modern but without the same structure of 2009 and certainly not 2008, if that were tasted here as well. Drink 2016-2020.  Tasted September 2016

Santa Sofia Amarone Della Valpolicella Classico DOCG 2011

A representative of a best vintage, a specific vineyard and the addition of molinara (five per cent), stabilizer and a grape that has been ripped out to be omitted from the other wines. Quite remarkably perfumed with florals (roses and violets) that Amarone just does not often have. Except here it is, fresh and potpourri and then a mouthfeel that goes to velvet despite the dangerously intense acidity. The finish is dusted with espresso and shaved by bittersweet chocolate. Not as drinkable, with more structure and outright hedonism. Will live in infamy. Drink 2018-2033.  Tasted September 2016

Sartori Amarone Della Valpolicella DOCG 2012

The blend is 50 per cent corvina, (30) corvinone, (15) rondinella and (5) cabernet sauvignon. Comes in at 15 per cent abv, after a hot summer, four months drying process, raisin and plum with a baked fruit character. Fleshy and nearly though not entirely severe. Steeped tea of a few varieties, some forest floor, deep and brooding tannins. Sage and balsamic. Would not wait any longer. This should be consumed early. Drink 2016-2019.  Tasted September 2016

Sartori Amarone Della Valpolicella DOC I Saltari 2009

Old vines (some more than 40, average age of 20), low yields (1.5 tonnes per hectare), again quite secondary, almost into prune but certainly of a fig character. Though this wine and the Corte Bra have developed quite quickly their body and disposition are left off in the middle, leaning away from the overs of extraction, over-pressing and over oaking. You may not accuse the Sartori wines of over oaking. They are made with some restraint, against the rising norm, but they do brood with dark as night character. Drink 2016-2022.  Tasted September 2016

Sergio Zenato Amarone Della Valpolicella DOCG 2010

Founded in 1960, village near Lago Garda on the east side. Village of Santa Moggio, where the Valoplicella estate is located. Father was Sergio, now with sister and mother. CCR 60-20-20 plus oselata and croetine grown at 300masl, red clay with stones, difficult to retain water so irrigation is used. This is the dried fig and chocolate bomb, with soy, balsamic and five spice. So Mediterranean savoury, thick and shaken. Lots of French vanilla feel with 300L French tonneaux and 500L, plus 300L and 5000L French and Slavonian oak casks. This may never, ever fully integrate. It’s the thickest milkshake you will ever find. It’s a mess at this time and 17 per cent so wait 10 more years for it to get interesting. Drink 2027-2042.  Tasted July 2017

Speri Vigneto Amarone Della Valpolicella Classico DOCG Monte Sant’Urbano 2012

Family business in Valpolicella. Single-Vineyard, top of the hill in the Fumane Valley. Fume, as in hot, from its volcanic origins, especially for corvina. Soft soils (in texture, yellowish, friable but gets sticky when wet so over cover crops like fescue and clover are employed) and this will translate into the wine. Heavy in corvina (80 per cent) with reasoning because of its affiliation to volcanic soil and because winemaker (of 25 years) Alberto Speri simply thinks it’s the best grape. The grape that finds the most elegance. High percentage of drying (40 per cent), use of big oak, four years. Will go out on a limb and say this will indeed be the most elegant in a line up of eight formidable Amarone. Drink 2019-2032.  Tasted July 2017

Good morning @C_Valpolicella from @accordinilgino

Stefano Accordini Amarone Della Valpolicella Classico DOCG Acinatico 2013

The latin name of the wine is Acinatico, from ancient Rome, indicating the wines delineated from this place, produced from these specific berries. The vines were planted by grandfather Gaetano and are now up to 85 years old. Quite reductive and so very rushed into market young but this is the normale so perfectly understandable. A whack of tannin is met by acidity in the most rushing wave of red citrus. The wine is so taut and wound that the house style of secondary savoury character hasn’t even become a twinkle in its eye. Chocolate shavings cover everything, they cover everything. The chocolate of Accordini. Drink 2019-2024.  Tasted September 2016

Stefano Accordini Amarone Della Valpolicella Classico DOCG Acinatico 2010

Has developed righteously, from a gritty and serious vintage, for which tannin was not at a premium. Plenty of expertly tempered chocolate works the mid-palate and the tart finish with a baker’s glaze. This is heavily wooded Amarone, sweet and custardy, mouth coating and really 90’s. Like Rioja or IGT from the same time period. Drink 2016-2020.  Tasted September 2016

Tedeschi Amarone della Valponicella Classico DOCG Monte Olmi 2011

Monte Olmi is a two and a half hectare parcel, southwest in the Classica area, where the winery is located. This archetypal Amarone was first produced in 1964 and is now an 8,000-10,000 bottle per year effort. The mix is classic Tedeschi corvina, corvinone and rondinella, in a one third of each plus minor percentages of oselata and several other endemic varieties (rossignola, negrara, dindarella, croatina and forselina), from the oldest parts of Monte Omi. This is the Amarone to celebrate tradition, keeping history alive and always remembering from where you’ve come. It spent four years in large casks and emerged at 17 per cent alcohol. The ceiling is reached, with balls, brash and no worries but is it balanced? Remarkably it is and also sour-edged, with tannin and the crazy, wild and free spirit of red fruit drawn off of morainic white and yellow limestone. But it will certainly improve and last as long as any. The acidity will see to that, even if the fruit fades. Drink 2021-2035.  Tasted July 2017

Tenuta Sant’Antonio Amarone Della Valpolicella DOCG Campo Dei Gigli 2012

Youngish winery, still essentially first generation, started in 1995. Armando Castagnedi is one of four brothers and Paolo is winemaker. They were born and worked in the vineyards but sold to cooperatives before. In the east (not in Classico), Montegarbi. The symbol of the flower of Sant’Antonio. White limestone chalky soil, lime and sand. Corvina (35), corvinone (35), rondinella (25) with croetina and oselata because of their elevation, wind, proximity to the sea with that wind in mind. Three years in tonneaux, not big barrels (young producer compromise). Clean and fruity with a syrupy pool in the middle, welling on the palate. Clocks in at 16 per cent, come out tonight. Drink 2017-2019.  Tasted July 2017

Tenuta Santa Maria Amarone Della Valpolicella Classico DOCG 2010

Separated five years ago from the parent (Bertani) winery. Gaetano Bertani is the winemaker with the help of consulting oenologist Franco Bernabei. One 7th the size of the larger Bertani, 380,000 bottles vs. 2.5 million and no one from the family works with them at all. Amarone is corvina, corvinone and rondinella, reductive and young, in need of air and so much more. Plenty of acidity and a rage of tannin. The red fruit capacity is boundless and with all the rage around this whirls like a hurricane. Rocking Amarone, old-school, leathery and dry. Drier than the Ripasso. Fruit leather roll-up. Restrained at 15 per cent alcohol and acts like less. The number is 7.5 g/L RS. Drink 2016-2022.  Tasted September 2016

Tommasi Amarone Della Valpolicella Classico Riserva DOC Ca’ Florian 2009

Presented by PierAngelo Tommasi. Founded in 1902, the new generation is 1997, nine “kids” from four fathers. Only since 1990 has this vineyard been dedicated to a single-vineyard wine and since 2010 as a Riserva. “This wine tastes this way because of the vineyard,” says PierAngelo “and not because it is called a Riserva.” CCR, 75-20-5. Fermentation in wooden vats and the aging in 500L (French) tonneaux (in the first year) is a departure (for Tommasi) and the next three are in large Slavonian casks. This is the third vintage for Ca’ Florian and though it is massive, it is not volatile nor is it acetic. At 15.5 per cent and 4 g/L of RS it states the least obvious connotational expectation for the style and goes against its peers. This should be the top vintage of this SV wine, considering the integration, the level of fruit, the texture and the potential for aging. Drink 2019-2032.  Tasted June 2017

Valentina Cubi Morar Amarone Della Valpolicella Classico DOCG 2010

Valentina’s estate is now farmed certified organica though some older Amarones were not. From 1963, the estate dates back to the 18th century. At 16.5 it has to be a lie, again, not just because of colour but clearly its lightness of being is anti-Amarone. The grip and the grit of the aridity and tannin is the crux of this wine but there is plenty of fruit. That said it has chocolate and woody notes that give it some commonality so it is obvious that Amarone is almost impossible to change and to seek revolution. But this is 2010, before Valentina could write organic on the label and before the winemaking turned to its present motives. It was also the vintage. Structured and long. 2018-2025.  Tasted September 2016

Valentina Cubi Morar Amarone Della Valpolicella Classico DOC 2007

In ways that composition and result make for a dramatic difference, this is more traditional, darker and more extracted but also cooler, further into savour and with that umami prevalent throughout the region. This is not separate or antithetical, quite spicy and wholly tannic. and yet it is neither thick nor overdone. White chocolate is all in, This 2007 has more finesse but also real creaminess, sweet, savoury and blanketing. And that umami, mushroom and consomée. Drink 2016-2021.  Tasted September 2016

Valentina Cubi Morar Amarone Della Valpolicella Classico DOC 2005

Wholly, utterly, invisibly resolved, all umami, full truffle, dried forest floor and porcini mushroom. Something pine savoury but all vanilla and green tea ice cream. Spice and smoke all over the palate and the finish. Clocks in at 16 per cent alcohol. Very good vintage and showing well. Must have been a tannic beast in its time. Drink 2016-2019.  Tasted September 2016

Venturini Amarone Della Valpolicella Classico DOCG Campo Masua 2011

Centre of the Classica area southwest of Negrar. Vines in the 20-25 year range, rocky and clay under the topsoil. “Toar” as in volcanic, a very friable soil. A very clear strata separation between soil and rock. Hot and very dried fruit aromas which conspire to mask the florals aching to get out. A corvina (70 per cent), corvinone (10) and rondinalla (20) blend, dried for five months “in the natural way” and aged in 3000L big barrels for four years. Dried plum and apricot, roasted almond, charred onion and smoked meat. Spicy off the piquant charts. Sweetness follows. 16.5 and every bit of it. Drink 2019-2026.  Tasted July 2017

Vignetti Di Ettore Amarone Della Valpolicella Classico DOCG 2012

One of the more if not the most fragrant Amarone, of peppery plum and pomegranate fruit, richness, depth and plenty of dusty espresso. Acidity and tannin are equal and opposing, subduing fruit for the time being though three of four years down the road all should be in synch. This will develop umami. For now it lurks. Drink 2019-2026.  Tasted September 2016

Vignetti Di Ettore Amarone Della Valpolicella Classico DOC 2008

The 2008 is right where the 2012 projects to be in four years, carrying its peppery and stemmy spice into a secondary world inhabited by figs and still to be determined dried fruit. Tannins were tougher in 2008 and acidity higher so this remains just a baby. Plenty of espresso, again, but also some developed chocolate. A really well made Amarone from back in the day. Drink 2017-2025.  Tasted September 2016

Zonin Amarone Della Valpolicella DOCG 2011

Looking for freshness, fruit, that corvina punch. Plums again as are all the wines and grinds upon grinds of pepper. So much syrah is like this. New world syrah. Plenty of chocolate. A bit weighty but the acidity and tannin will drive this machine. It is a fruit first Amarone, that much is clear. The spice is everywhere though, which speaks to the wood as a major part of the impression. Very typical. How it was and many observe as should be. Hot finish detracts from the fruit freshness Drink 2017-2026.  Tasted September 2016

Recioto Della Valpolicella DOCG

Buglioni Recioto Della Valpolicella Classico DOCG ‘Il Narcisista’ (500 Ml) 2011

Like honey, with leesy, cheesy, red citrus and earthy notes mixed in. Gracious natural sweetness, use of sulphur to stop the fermentation, 140 g/L of rS (which is the maximum, can be as low as 110). The nose is remarkable, short on the sweetness despite the honey, so more like honeycomb. Good narcissist, if there is such a thing. Drink 2017-2027.  Tasted September 2016

Ca’ La Bionda Recioto Della Valpolicella Classico DOCG 2012

The drinkable Recioto with a level of sugar comparable to many producers’ Amarone. Aromas resemble the Amarone, as does the mouthfeel. Once you taste this “dessert” wine you can never go back. Plum, strawberry, beautiful. Caressing. Elegant. Finessed. Drink 2016-2028.  Tasted September 2016

Ca’ Rugate Recioto Della Valpolicella DOCG L’Eremita 2012

From a 500 mL bottle, a sweet disposition on a moderate (13.5 per cent) alcohol frame with Amaro liqueur bitterness. Liquorice and menthol on the nose, then plum pudding, black cherry dominant and mint jelly to taste. So much cooler than to what expectation would have made a commitment. Oh, it’s a Cherry Blossom, dark chocolate and when cracked open lets out the ooze of silky confection. Drink 2016-2021.  Tasted September 2016

Domini Veneti Amando Recioto Della Valpolicella Classico DOCG Amandorlato (Charmat Method Spumante Recioto) 2010

Charmat Method spumante Recioto, from one of last producers to do so, carrying on the home bottler’s accidental tradition. In the past apricot (or cherry) leaves or seeds were added to impart an almond flavour (Amandorlato) but today it’s developed leaving the Recioto in small cherry wood barriques with a low, slow and sugar burning fermentation. Naturally achieved 17 per cent alcohol without fortification, unique and meant for chocolate and cheese. “And a good cigar.” Less or more 25 euro retail or 19 ex-cellar or lets say $75-80 Canadian. Smells just like a Cherry Blossom, from the tree and out of the candy box. Sweet, bitter, drying and hot. An expensive acquired taste. Will drink for decades. Drink 2016-2046.  Tasted September 2016

Novaia Recioto Della Valpolicella DOCG 2013

From the oldest parcels in the oldest vineyard at La Novaia, the same process of the Amarone, using more ripe grapes, with an extended drying time to concentrate the juice. Fermentation arrested with cold temperature, registers 13.5 abv and spent one year in barrel. If it doesn’t happen the wine is filtered but that’s rarely needed. Full on black cherry syrup, runny raspberry confiture, sweet fennel tea and Chambord. Sweet but not milkshake thick. Great red chalky, spring maple bleed. A good Recioto ooze. Drink 2016-2026.  Tasted September 2016

Santa Sofia Recioto Della Valpolicella Classico DOC 2009

Same make-up as the Gioé Amarone, aged in Frenck oak for 14 months, plus 12 months in bottle. “A niche product that is hard to transmit its importance.” Of course no sugar adjustment, so to maximize the natural design, the fermentation is arrested naturally when the alcohol number is breached. Here at 14.5, higher on the Recioto scale but stlll well below the level of fortified. A balanced effort with acidity, tannin, bitters, tonic and plum essence sweetness. Dries out at then end with a pasty finish like salumi. Drink 2017-2028.  Tasted September 2016

Valentina Cubi Recioto Della Valpolicella Classico DOC Meliloto 2000

At 14.5 per cent and not produced every year, after this 2000 again in 2003 and 2010. Vanilla bean and ground espresso, cherry ooze or confiture. Dark chocolate, mint and orange zest. There is your pairing. Drink 2016-2026.  Tasted September 2016

Vignetti Di Ettore Recioto Della Valpolicella Classico DOCG 2013

Alcohol equitable to weight, acidity buoyant, dry extract elevated and residual sugar well-adjusted. Here we have typical and rich, balanced and ephemeral Recioto. What it needs to be. Drink 2016-2025.  Tasted September 2016

Zonin Recioto Di Gambellara Classico DOCG Il Giangio 2011

A 100 per cent garganega, aged in tonneaux, 24-36 months. “The typicity of this soil in garganega,” volcanic but dark basalt, apricot and pineapple with a minor herbal note and menthol cool, very sweet on the palate. Tart and sour, very pineapple, oil and mineral by basalt, not sticky but a salve, specific to Gambellara. There are 10-12 producers who make this wine (out of the 15-20 in the appellation). A very specific dessert wine. A 12-13 g/L RS number which seems impossible. Drink 2016-2025.  Tasted September 2016

Good to go!

godello

Memories of Verona

Twitter: @mgodello

Instagram: mgodello

WineAlign

Massimago in astral Valpolicella light

camilla-rossi-chauvenet

Camilla Rossi Chauvenet

I have been thinking quite a bit lately about certain producers I have met through the course of my recent travels. Every wine region has its stars and while it’s quite rare to have a bad visit or negative experience, some visits simply turn on the lights.  Sometimes there comes along a winemaker and a place with a special kind of light. Last September I found such an experience on a windswept limestone ridge in Valpolicella. Massimago.

windswept-white-limestone-vineyard-at-massimago

Windswept white limestone vineyard at Massimago

Words of advice. “Lasciate la vostre ansia e le scarpe al cancello.” Massimago is the dream of Camilla Rossi Chauvenet, in Mezzane di Sotto found in Valpolicella’s Mezzane Valley. “A little heaven in the north part of Italy.” Massimago, from the Latin “Maximum Agium,” the maximum benefit. Camilla considers Mezzane as the most secret and wild of Valpolicella and her family’s land has belonged to the Cracco Family (on the maternal side) since 1883. In 2003 she began to transform the company into its modern-day renaissance.

Now (and I believe since 2014, officially) organic though that has always been the philosophy, the new generation believes in the Eminem credo, one shot equals one opportunity. Young guardian and creator of Massimago Camilla Rossi Chauvenet’s  roots are never forgotten, emotion and creativity define identity and complexity will lead to longevity. On her website Camilla writes, “Massimago and I are tightly holding our hands, step by step, sooner or later we shall arrive, but please do not hurry us, time in nature is slow and unstoppable.” Truth.

Lasciate la vostre ansia e le scarpe al cancello

There are 28 hectares of vineyards, olive trees and woods. The soils are a nominative palette of limestone, marl and clay. Traditional varieties (corvina, corvine and rondinella) cultivated in Pergola are transformed into wines assembled from only estate grapes. A wine relais experience on site confirms Massimago as a Veronese wine experience hotel. As noted in Italian above there is but one rule. “Leave your anxiety and your shoes at the gate.”

On that September day I paid a visit and sat down to taste seven Massimago wines with John Szabo M.S., Joshua Corea, Annette Bruley, Jules Garton, José Luis Fernández, Lauren Hall and Nick Chajoglou. I could hardly contain my enthusiasm and these wines changed everything I thought I knew about Valpolicella. Così grande, così perfetto. I saw the light.

mago-brut-rose

Magò Brut Rosé

Massimago Spumante Brut Rosé Millésime Magò 2014, Veneto, Italy (Agent, $34.95, WineAlign)

Magò is Camilla Rossi Chauvenet’s Charmat Method, 100 per cent corvina blush sparkler and another Massimago wine born of dreams and initiative. We climb to the top of the exposed white limestone ridge to sample this unmitigated refreshing fizz, light, aromatic and ethereal. To say it does wonders for grape, method and place would be the correct way to explain the situation. Magò sees 10 hours of maceration and eight months of lees aging. Though intentionally sweet (10.4 g/L RS) it is expertly balanced by acidity and even more so by exceptionally dry, limestone-conditioned extract. This is the key and the kicker, that and elevation, on a windswept, exposed geological place of wonder. The setting and presentation notwithstanding this is an impressive effort from the simplest of technologies at the hands of the soft-spoken and the kind. So yes, do enjoy this with “an elegant dress, the magic of waiting and the taste of freedom.” Or whatever romantic notion you prefer to call your own. Drink 2016-2019.  Tasted September 2016

Massimago Valpolicella 2014, Veneto, Italy (Agent, $29.95, WineAlign)

Few reference points can prepare you for Massimago’s style of Valpolicella so simply use this as the ingress. Plucked from vines in the Mezzane Valley in the east part of Verona province, rising from the village of Vago towards Mezzane di Sotto. Camilla Rossi Chauvenet’s precocious blend is the crisp, crunchy, pure as driven white limestone portal into the soils laid out in amphitheatre vineyard grid. Camilla uses only stainless steel tanks here to accentuate a basal clarity brush stroke on her Valpolicella canvas. This from a selection of the grapes that will not enter the Amarone process, the second and third pass harvested bunches. Cherry and silty saline mingle at the interces of limestone. How can you miss the white stone in the naked Valpolicella? You can’t. It’s without make-up, transparent, naked to the world. The wine speaks a natural vernacular and the land is spoken for. If villages-level Bourgogne were made like this all would be well in the world. Lithe, delicate and perfumed. Drink 2016-2019.  Tasted September 2016

godello-can-hardly-contain-his-enthusiasm-for-camillas-valpolicella

Godello can hardly contain his enthusiasm for Camilla’s Valpolicella

Massimago Valpolicella Superiore Profasio 2012, Veneto, Italy (Agent, $54.95, WineAlign)

Profasio establishes new territory for Valpolicella Superiore from Mezzane Valley fruit in a wine over dinner “that lets you talk.” A careful and specific selection of Corvina, Corvinone and Rondinella (65/30/5) is subjected to “un leggero appassimento,” or a “slight withering” from one month of drying and the rest kept thankfully and respectfully fresh. The child is raised in stainless steel for five months plus one year in 2nd and 3rd passage barrels. This is Valpolicella meant to partner up with dinner for two, replete with secret recipes and crossing glances. “We feel the appassimento method is about levels of aromatics,” tells Camilla Rossi Chauvenet. In such a contrary to Superiore belief we find freshness and anti-jam the goal and as a result, the wine is allowed to tell a story. A script written cursively, crisp and pure, crunchy like the normale with an addendum of aromatic profiling; cherry, leather and red citrus. Profasio is a wine of good temper and vision (and could mean profezia, or prophecy, or perhaps a surname in reference to Dante and the Veronese ebraico’s Almanacco Perpetuo), a Valpolicella into a second level of contemplation, but not too much. The wine causes no worries, no anxiety and shoes are left at the bottom of the mountain. Profasio with its hint of dried momentum is a wine of communication and a new way of communicating. Drink 2016-2021.  Tasted September 2016

Camilla Rossi-Chauvenet talks Ripasso

Camilla Rossi-Chauvenet talks Ripasso

Massimago Valpolicella Ripasso Marchesi Mariabella 2014, Veneto, Italy (Agent, $40.95, WineAlign)

Yet another new launching point, this time for the much maligned Ripasso category, acquiesced through the fresh urgency of the whimsical Marchesi MariaBella. The fruit is borne of a a much earlier ripening vineyard outside of Massimago, perched only at an insignificant 100m on Argileux soil. This a Ripasso I will wager large you have never tasted before. La Bella Poesia, “is different because its literary destiny has followed a strange path.” To say that a feminine disposition, temperament and engagement fills not just the aromatics but also the texture would be a Valpolicella understatent of this early century. There is virtually no dried fruit on the nose; there is more tension than the two classic Valpolicellas which is both counter-intuitive to terroir and to methodology. Ripasso needs to carry both weight and tension. It needs to have some elegance. It requires acidity and freshness. This walks that very line and it will age gracefully and with beauty. Incidentally to answer the query of whimsy each character on the label represents the democracy of the proletariat. Drink 2016-2022.  Tasted September 2016

this-is-camilla-and-matteo-they-will-change-everything-you-thought-you-knew-about-valpolicella

This is Camilla and Matteo. They will change everything you thought you knew about #valpolicella

Massimago Amarone Della Valpolicella Conte Gastone 2011, Veneto, Italy (Agent, $77.95, WineAlign)

If at first the Conte Gastone Amarone seems to be the freshest Amarone ever tasted it will in fact creep up and get upside so don’t be fooled. It is in fact a brooding, sulking, contemplative mess of intense fruit. The assessment is magnified when compared to a barrel sample of 2015 tasted minutes before. With no disrespect to carefully raised and quite specific red fruit the 2011 Amarone punch drunk (16.5 per cent alcohol) love can’t help but overwhelm as is its want and ilk. Here the Massimago conditioning of (65/30/5) corvina, corvinone and rondinella is treated with 100 days of appassimento, 30 months in large botti and smaller French barriques and then 12 further months in bottle. Camilla’s suggestion would be to enjoy her Amarone “brainstorming with friends, feasting on dreams and quiet omnipotence.” While hers is indeed more cerebral and contemplative inducing than most, 2011 is just a beginning and fashioned as a means preparing Valpolicella towards an end that will begin with that fresh maker of a ’15. Drink 2017-2024.  Tasted September 2016

"I gotta have some of your attention, give it to me." @massimago #special #brassinpocket

“I gotta have some of your attention, give it to me.” @massimago #special #brassinpocket

Massimago Amarone Della Valpolicella 2011, Veneto, Italy (Agent, $109.95, WineAlign)

The packed and punchy Massimago labeled simply Amarone is the stronger one and with deferential ability manages to bring the Conte Gastone into bright, fresh, highlighted, beautiful infrared light. Not that the fruit is any less presumptuous or magnificent but considered side by side here it is really just acidity and tannin that drives the intense machine. The suggestions of “brainstorming, feasting and omnipotence” are more than apropos for a wine of preponderance, indulgence and power. The young wine is rigid and so full of fruit, an impossible combination in Amarone and like the Gastone is just a precurser to what will be coming in Camilla Rossi-Chauvenet’s dreamy Valpolicella future. Drink 2018-2025.  Tasted September 2016

sneak-label-preview-of-camillas-massimago-pet-nat-sparkling-cosi-grande-cosi-perfetto

Sneak label preview of Camilla’s @massimago pét-nat sparkling. Così grande, così perfetto

Massimago Zurlie, IGT Verona, Italy (Agent, $21.95, WineAlign)

Zurlie is Massimago’s newest product, a 100 per cent confondere corvina made in the sur lie Vino Rifermentato In Bottiglia style. The fruit is 100 per cent 2015 and until now, no one in Valpolicella has tried to make sparkling wine in this confounding style. Passes through secondary fermentation with sugar added into the bottle and then a seal under crown cap. Extreme acidity abounds because it’s accomplished sur lie, a wine to clean your mouth at the end of a wine tasting. Delicately raises a perfume almost after the fact from an easy drinking picnic wine stolen straight from the fridge. So much fun and just extreme freshness, in a way cider does but also cannot do. This speaks at the highest level of simple brillance. A four year dream in the making. Drink 2016-2018.  Tasted September 2016

when-you-visit-massimago-%22lasciate-la-vostre-ansia-e-le-scarpe-al-cancello%22-c_valpolicella-organic-camilla

When you visit @massimago “lasciate la vostre ansia e le scarpe al cancello” @C_Valpolicella #organic #camilla

Good to go!

Godello

Twitter: @mgodello

Instagram: mgodello

WineAlign

Top ten imports at VINTAGES from May 30th

Organic Sirloin, parsley, black olive

Organic Sirloin, parsley, black olive

Should you be counting and despite the number of wines you will read about below, I have to tell you honestly that I was a highly competent mathematics student through high school. Distractions including but not restricted to cooking, music, words, pop culture, sports and ancient works of antiquity paved new roads but I can still count to ten. This list goes up to eleven because I could not in good conscience leave Thomas Bachelder’s pulchritudinous NSG out in the first day of June cold.

Related – Du bon Bachelder: Burgundy, Oregon, Niagara

So I tasted again and have updated my note on La Petite Charmotte 2011, a beneficient Bourgogne that hit LCBO shelves this past weekend. The Bachelder project turns water into wine in three countries. By now you know all about the trinité-terroir schematic as I’ve written about Thomas and Mary many times. The fact that VINTAGES happens to now be releasing the 2011 LPC, predecessor to the already tasted and reviewed 2012, the “single-vineyard NSG hugged up on a northern slope,” is of consequence because it’s a memorable, cellar-worthy wine from a really stunning vintage.

Related – Eight Ontarians to be released on May 30th

The other top 10 all happen to be reds, save for one exiguous white Burgundy. France and Italy (a.k.a. Old World) dominate the remainder, except for a lone, paradigmatic Chilean Cabernet Sauvignon and a refreshing McLaren Vale Shiraz. Get out there folks, spoken one more time in guiltless refrain. Here are your tasting notes.

From left to right: La Ferme Du Mont Première Côte Côtes Du Rhône 2012, Altivitis Ventoux 2011, Corino Dolcetto d'Alba 2013, Errazuriz Aconcagua Alto Cabernet Sauvignon 2012 and Maison Roche De Bellene Vieilles Vignes Bourgogne Chardonnay 2012

From left to right: La Ferme Du Mont Première Côte Côtes Du Rhône 2012, Altivitis Ventoux 2011, Corino Dolcetto d’Alba 2013, Errazuriz Aconcagua Alto Cabernet Sauvignon 2012 and Maison Roche De Bellene Vieilles Vignes Bourgogne Chardonnay 2012

La Ferme Du Mont Première Côte Côtes Du Rhône 2012, Ac Rhône, France (251645, $14.95, WineAlign)

A different sort of CdR works from this unfiltered red, on the side of winemaking that summons modern Rosso Sangiovese Grosso. That’s caused by the concentration of cherry liqueur, dried roses and a greater aromatic feeling of potpourri. Yet there is also fresh raspberry and at the other end of the spectrum, cured meat. With a touch of Brett it recalls Grosso in deeper, more expensive terms. The middle palate is a touch hollow, but at $15 beggars need not be choosers and so much pepper marks the austere finish. Add it up and the two words that come to mind are simply complexity and value. Drink 2015-2019.  Tasted May 2015  @Eurovintage  @VINSRHONE

Altivitis Ventoux 2011, Ac Rhône, France (414359, $17.95, WineAlign)

Prodigious Ventoux for a pittance considering the stuffing and the Mencia-esque (think Pittacum) deep, dark, black cherry and purple berry dressing. Rich and actually structured with equal and opposing tannins. That said, it never sheds its high-toned, carbonic youthfulness and the aromas are peppered by five spice, mandarin and hoisin. Something about this also reminds of Cru Beaujolais, but like an immature, yet volatile tank sample of Brouilly. But it’s more new world than that, so I wouldn’t construe all this as complexity, or balance for that matter, but instead, distraction. It’s certainly worth a look, with near, value-driven greatness due to righteous acidity, in a modern, semi-distinct representation of the region. If you like to keep it dark and sorcerer powerful, go gothic with this Ventoux. Drink 2015-2018.  Tasted May 2015  @AOCVentoux

Three from the Rhône Valley at VINTAGES May 30, 2015

Three from the Rhône Valley at VINTAGES May 30, 2015

Corino Dolcetto d’Alba 2013, Doc Piedmont, Italy (412353, $18.95WineAlign)

Three district aromas emanate; fresh carbon-stoned fruit, cheese and earth. Plums and liquorice on the palate. More cheese. High acidity with gramercy to punctuality, dimension and peak performance prickling. A minutiae of tannin ekes out an ageing component. Could go both ways bitter finish. Better than most Dolcetto. Drink 2015-2017.  Tasted May 2015  @danieliwines  @vinidelpiemonte

Errazuriz Aconcagua Alto Cabernet Sauvignon 2012, Aconcagua Valley, Chile (203364, $19.95, WineAlign)

Presence and exceptional poise define the role played by this Cabernet Sauvignon. The character portraiture is so very Chilean. Florals oscillate in waves of vanilla, along with currants and tobacco. Dig in some Aconcagua earth and bell pepper, melded into and lost in an ol’ tenebrous, cimmerian buttermilk sky. Lush, rich and piqued by cracked pepper, anise and the dusty redundancy of liquorice root. Legitimately oaky but that is entirely OK. Drink 2015-2020.  Tasted May 2015  @errazurizwines  @Dandurandwines  @DrinkChile

Maison Roche De Bellene Vieilles Vignes Bourgogne Chardonnay 2012, Burgundy, France (299867, $20.95, WineAlign)

So stylish for entry-level Burgundy, ascertained and finessed by a light yet steady approach. Creamy texture stands out, above freshness and the under subtle tone of buttery oak. I don’t find it at all toasty but more of a slow, low temperature, moisture deprivation in the whirl of a dehydrator. Enter the forest through the gates of this Bourgogne on the route to Meursault. Drink 2015-2018.  Tasted May 2015  @RochedeBellene  @Nicholaspearce_

From left to right: Famille Perrin Les Christins Vacqueyras 2012, Serafino Shiraz 2012, Pierre Amadieu Romane Machotte Gigondas 2012, Badia A Coltibuono Chianti Classico Riserva 2009, Bachelder La Petite Charmotte Nuits Saint Georges 2011 and Monte Faustino Amarone Della Valpolicella Classico 2008

From left to right: Famille Perrin Les Christins Vacqueyras 2012, Serafino Shiraz 2012, Pierre Amadieu Romane Machotte Gigondas 2012, Badia A Coltibuono Chianti Classico Riserva 2009, Bachelder La Petite Charmotte Nuits Saint Georges 2011 and Monte Faustino Amarone Della Valpolicella Classico 2008

Famille Perrin Les Christins Vacqueyras 2012, Ac Rhône, France (973453, $23.95, WineAlign)

I tasted this Vacqueyras back in the fall of 2014 but did not write a formal tasting note. Six months in bottle has done it some serious, generous justice, in the aromatic simulacrum of balance. Settling has tempered what heat there may have been in extreme youth, humouring and buttressing the lamina of red fruit to stand alone, in avoidance of an impasse in jam. This has class in all months, seasons and at every level of education. It is both student and T.A., dug in to study and to mentor younger Vacqueyras in search of such structure and wisdom. Spice and smoke throw signals of added coil, only to relent to the drupe and resolve for involution. Times also allow for pretty florals beholden to garrigue. Chalk and grain give the tannin elasticity. Exemplary and necessary Vac with an inconsequential asking price. Drink 2016-2022.  Tasted May 2015  @Beaucastel  @ChartonHobbs  @VINSRHONE

Serafino Shiraz 2012, McLaren Vale, South Australia, Australia (407718, $28.95, WineAlign)

A richly textured, solidly structured and surprisingly believable, relatively tame, low alcohol (14 per cent) McLaren Vale Shiraz. The flowers are strewn across the aromatic entry, relenting to cedar and ripe berries. What a sincere inhalation of beautiful. Classic bones to carry a sense of place, constructed with heady serenity and savour faire. Shiraz of a tall order, to please many camps, from finesse to power, for instant pleasure and in attraction of the cellar junky. Drink 2016-2022.  Tasted May 2015  @SerafinoVino  @mclaren_vale

Pierre Amadieu Romane Machotte Gigondas 2012, Rhône Valley, France (973453, $27.95, WineAlign)

Show me an off vintage of the Romane Machotte Gigondas and I’ll throw in the proverbial tasting towel. This Amadieu can never disappoint. The ’12 offers spicy, smoky, piquant accents over top big red fruit. Much reduced yet non-reductive freshness abounds, set upon a valance of liquorice and dried flowers. The stuffing is packed and brimming, the herbs and verdancy sacrosanct with just the right kind of sting. Has savour but I would stop short of calling it savoury. It’s raspy but not rapacious. The Grenache-Syrah blend bides and lingers, long as the road that links Romane and Machotte. Drink 2016-2022.  Tasted May 2015  @Amadieu_G

Badia A Coltibuono Chianti Classico Riserva 2009, Docg Tuscany, Italy (683474, $38.95WineAlign)

This is a very understated, creeping, impossibly concentrated Chianti Classico Riserva. Positively vital, as classic as classic gets while not once reverting to the kind of rusticity that refuses adaptation, ignores permutation or refutes progress. The cleanest fruit is scented by the dulcet appraisal of truffle and porcini. The pitch is just about perfect, the acidity ideal and the balance struck between fruit, barrel and age. Earth grounds the entire ordeal, rendering it peaceful and pleasurable, the possibilities playing out enjoyable and endless. The organic ’09 can be poured right now and the legs will take this down roads as long as the SP408 to Traversa and Gaiole in Chianti. Drink 2015-2029.  Tasted May 2015   @coltibuono  @HalpernWine  @chianticlassico

Bachelder La Petite Charmotte Nuits Saint Georges 2011, Ac Burgundy, France (357228, $49.95, WineAlign)

The spice notes reign in May, 2015. A smoulder stick of limestone wicks through the red, earthy fruit. Petite only in grace and largesse, in longevity this stretches from Nuits-Saint-Georges to roads leading in all directions. Careful, delicate and yet profoundly, powerfully restrained, not to be ignored Pinot Noir. Drink 2018-2025.

From my earlier note of November 2013:

Is so floral, mineral, intense and hypnotic it might be dubbed the Serpent Charmer. Iron and wine indeed, the iron of Nuits, the perfume of Beaune. This provocative bottling represents the third year of production, is conspicuous in Anis de Flavigny and an underlying gate. If montagnes is the harming one, this is the charming one. These are all from the same barrels, so what really affects the wines the most? Land and hand.

Last tasted May 2015  @Bachelder_wines

Monte Faustino Amarone Della Valpolicella Classico 2008, Doc Veneto, Italy (327122, $56.95, WineAlign)

You know it’s big, hot and full-bodied. But oh if this isn’t the epitome of how Amarone can woo, thrill and hypnotize. The fig-date-palm-dried fruit feeling proliferates within an anise liqueur base. The caked, cracking and arid earth flakes, chips and cuts with a mustard of spices. The smooth and velvety mouthfeel has variegated chalk and grain. Such a promiscuous Valpolicella that fleshes and swells as it swirls. Intense, rich and yet neither overpowers nor climbs over the top. Drink 2018-2028.  Tasted May 2015  @RegioneVeneto

Good to go!

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