South Africa’s Capelands in VINTAGES February 6th

South Africa comes to VINTAGES February 6th

South Africa comes to VINTAGES February 6th

For a comprehensive look at South Africa’s Capelands, read my report at WineAlign.

Related – Welcome to South Africa’s Capelands

On Saturday, February 6th, VINTAGES is running a feature on South African wines. Laid out in varietal by varietal terms, South Africa is deconstructed to articulate and accentuate what’s happening in today’s Western Cape and how it translates to markets around the world. I spent some time back in September with VINTAGES product manager Ann Patel in the Cape. Her picks have much to do with what she found, in excitement from “breaking boundaries and forging new ground with winemaking.” As consumers we should look forward to more chances taken in LCBO purchasing decisions, in varietals and from a more eclectic mix of wineries.

Related – Once upon a time in the Western Cape

The landscape of South African wine is demarcated by ancient geology and by the geographical diversity of its regions, sub-regions and micro-plots. Varietal placement is the key to success. As I mentioned in previous articles, South African winemakers can grow anything they want, to both their discretion and their whimsy. The choice of what grows best and where will determine the successes of the future.

Related – Wines of South Africa: It’s the fling itself

As the understanding of cool-climate locales dotting the landscape continues to develop, so too does the Sparkling wine oeuvre. The association that determines the authenticity of Méthode Cap Classique is more than just a marketing strategy and a copy of Méthode Champenoise. It is a distinctly South African program, established in 1992. Rules dictate a minimum of 12 months on the lees and post disgorgement, further maturation under cork. Winemakers are free to play with beyond those simple parameters. That is the South African way. Stand together and act alone.

Related – Wines of South Africa: Go Cars Go

In addition to these February 6th South African releases I have reviewed many added highlights. Next week I will publish 50 more tasting notes on important wines tasting in the Cape last September. Some are available through their Ontario wine agents while others are not. At least not yet. There are many undiscovered South African wines that will soon be finding their way into our market. Here are the eight wines coming to VINTAGES on February 6th.

Related South African duck dynasty

Avondale_Wines_Jonty_s_Ducks_Pekin_White_web

Avondale Wines Jonty’s Ducks Pekin White 2014, Wo Paarl, South Africa (439554, $14,95, WineAlign)

The house white with the Avondale ducks always in mind. “How does mother nature do it? For each problem there is a natural predator available to do the job.” The holistic approach applies to the winemaking of Johnathan Grieve as well. In 2014 there is an easier and more naturalistic feel. With less oak and lees, some rest and the result is increased freshness, especially for the dominant Chenin Blanc. Ready to go as we speak. Drink 2015-2018.  Tasted September 2015 and January 2016  @Avondalewine  @RareEarth_Wines

Ken Forrester Old Vine Reserve Chenin Blanc 2015

Ken Forrester Chenin Blanc Old Vine Reserve 2015, Wo Stellenbosch, South Africa (231282, $17,95, WineAlign)

The signature purpose with respect to Chenin Blanc by Ken Forrester skips zero beats and misses no opportunity to varietal boldly go for what Stellenbosch just needs. Draw fruit from old vines, let it work its grape tannic magic then spin away, a rising child of centrifuge into constellatory divination. Ken Forrester says he’s always afraid of stretching too far. “If the eastern and western fronts are too far apart, you lose the war.” From 1965 plantings in Piekenierskloof, two weeks of skin contact was followed by time in 300L, 8-10 year old barrels, “neutral as hell.” When tasted in September 2015, the wine was reductive, with a bit of aromatic grit and VA. It was a raw and unfiltered wallower. Now? Chenin Blanc of heft, poise and tenderness. It’s all in the preparations. Such juice at such an absence of cost should be illegal. Drink 2016-2020.  Tasted January 2016  @KFwines  @Noble_Estates

Graham Beck Brut Rosé Méthode Cap Classique, Wo Western Cape, South Africa (175588, $19.95, WineAlign)

An ode and an adherence to the magic of Cap Classique style, always with that sage feeling of evolution in age. Made pretty with its skin pink depth though I must admit to nosing and tasting the inimitable South African soil. Still, it is clearly and decisively Pinot Noir that floats the boat and rights the ship. This has noirs in its psyche and the Western Cape in its soul. Drink 2016-2020.  Tasted January 2016  @GrahamBeckWines  @Vinexxperts

Nederburg Manor House Shiraz 2013, Wo Coastal Region, South Africa (68775, $16.95, WineAlign)

Meaty, dark fruit and soil pure Shiraz. At this point in South Africa’s red wine production I would go to lengths to call this old school. It’s a blast from the recent and forward thinking past. Stew recommended, marbled protein required. Drink 2016-2020.  Tasted January 2016  @Nederburg  @MarkAnthonyWine  @ImportWineMAFWM

Cathedral Cellar Pinotage 2013, Wo Coastal Region, South Africa (99267, $16.95, WineAlign)

A twain marker, bridge gapper, two worlds colliding Pinotage. Full of spice and soil chalky spirit. There may well yet be one foot half-depressed into the clay of the last two decades of Pinotage but the other is pointed north, into the bright future. Some weighty density keeps the Western Cape fruit brutally honest and yet the cathedral is bright, filled with light and carefully slight. This will please camps on either end of the field. I would suspect that future vintages will pull the other foot from the muck and see this Pinotage walk off into the proverbial Pinotage sunset. Drink 2016-2019.  Tasted January 2016  @KWVwines  @Dandurandwines

Graham Beck The Game Reserve Cabernet Sauvignon 2013, Western Cape, South Africa (2519, $18.95, WineAlign)

Beck’s GM is spot on Cabernet Sauvignon of place; rich, ferric, tightly spun and wait for it…gamy. Not funky mind you but meaty in a fresh kill, flesh charred, grilled and juices settled way. If red protein and something South African are on the mind, this cracker of a Graham Beck signature varietal dutifully fulfills the dream. And it will age to change. Drink 2016-2020.  Tasted January 2016  @GrahamBeckWines  @Vinexxperts

Rustenberg R.M. Nicholson 2013, Wo Stellenbosch, South Africa (278390, $19.95, WineAlign)

A Shiraz, Merlot and Cabernet Sauvignon blend of chaste class and haute style, if decidedly warm and ripe. The aromatics are berry directed, with a floral lilt and a volatile note well within an acceptable and supporting role. Carries its alcohol with confidence in ease, to develop the flavours and lengthen the pleasure. Wait a year for it to show best. Drink 2017-2020.  Tasted January 2016  @RustenbergWines  @WoodmanWS

Rupert & Rothschild Classique 2012, Wo Western Cape, South Africa (434787, $22.95, WineAlign)

This stellar value stalwart Cabernet Sauvignon (60 per cent) and Merlot (40) of Left Bank leanings brings together the brains and braun of Anthonij Rupert Wyne Estate and Benjamin de Rothschild. The vintage picks up where 2011 left off, built on a pillar of protein, soluble fruit and salt. A Franschhoek Valley gibbous and velutinous red with sweet plasma running through adolescent testosterone veins. The barrel treatment (18 months in 225L French) is the fabric softener. The balance encompassing ripe fruit, savoury salinity and spindled acidity makes for a formidable if quiescent package. Will take its sweet time developing secondary and tertiary characteristics. Great value. Drink 2016-2020.  Tasted January 2016  @RupertRoths  @Dandurandwines

Good to go!

Twitter: @mgodello

Instagram: mgodello

WineAlign: Michael Godel

Facebook

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s