Fontodi’s one hundred per cent sangiovese

In @chianticlassico mano nella mano 1986, @fontodi #vignadelsorbo & #flaccianello thank you Giovanni Manetti for sharing these two opposing forces of the Tuscan paradox #chianticlassico

I have spent quite a bit of time in Chianti Classico over the past two years, most recently during the last week of September. The occupation of study and discovery and the investigation into the intricacies and multiplicities of the region’s sangiovese prepossess a lifelong infatuation. If the cumulative is a factor of compulsive obsession so be it and while decades of learning are left to attack, an essential visit can now be crossed off the bucket list. With Giovanni Manetti at Fontodi.

Fontodi is a certified organic estate which extends over 130 hectares of which approximately 70 are planted to vines. When you break down the name into two parts, first fonte or “source” and odi, “hate” you paint an image in etymology that couldn’t be further from the truth. Take a walk through the estate’s vineyards set in Panzano’s Conca d’Oro and the exact opposite unfolds. Fontodi’s estate vines are as described (and for the effects on health and happiness) prescribed as a place of “high altitude, calcaire-clay-schist soil, lots of light, and a fantastic micro-climate – warm and dry with a marked difference in day and night-time temperatures.” Lots of light is really key, “un sacco di luce,” or as it could be construed, “a source of love.” Spend three hours with Fontodi’s proprietor Giovanni Manetti and you’ll get the picture. Fontodi as Fonte di amore.

Related – All in with Chianti Classico

Giovanni Manneti showing the sangiovese of the 2017 harvest

Today is September the 23rd. First we take a drive down into the Conca d’Oro and walk in the vines. The sangiovese blocks with the finest exposure and the most sun have just recently been picked. Others are coming in as we speak. The rest will be harvested by the end of the week. It has been a most unusual vintage in Chianti Classico. One of the warmest and driest winters on record is interrupted by a near-devastating spring frost then followed by scorching summer temperatures and no rain. The grapes dry up and desiccate to nearly nothing with the danger of an empty harvest looming. Then a miracle happens and the rains fall during one crazy week in early September.

There are producers who make a fateful mistake. They pick their sangiovese ahead of the rains. Sugar and alcohol are high in the shrivelled berries but phenolic ripeness lags well behind. The stems and seeds in these preemptively harvested sangiovese are green, underdeveloped and bitter. The tannins will follow suit. Though these wines will be jammy and flavourful in the first year or two, the hollow feeling on their mid-palate and the astringency on their finish will expose their weakness. Giovanni Manetti makes no such mistake. He allows the grapes to swell with the much-needed watering and then watches them develop their phenolics over the following weeks of warm weather. His sangiovese are beautiful, lower in yield, with many of the bunches and their berries smaller in size, but ripe nonetheless. It may not turn out to be a great year for Chianti Classico and Flaccianello economics but the 2017 wines will shine.

Have not seen a prettier cow than the #chianina raised for @dariocecchinimacellaio on the @fontodi organic farm in Panzano

We move on down to visit the Chianina. The Chianina are an ancient and very large Italian breed of cattle raised mainly for beef. The beautiful, regal and majestic cows are famous for producing the meat for Toscana’s bistecca alla fiorentina. Giovanni’s herd are nurtured for one specific purpose, to supply the most famous butcher in Italy Dario Cecchini with his meat. Says Cecchini, “The Officina della Bistecca is our convivial way of answering the difficult question of the perfect way of cooking Her Majesty the Bistecca alla Fiorentina and Her Sisters the Costata and the Panzanese steak.” The farm to table relationship between Fontodi and Antica Macelleria Cecchini is witnessed right here, first hand.

Pinot Nero in Amphora at Fontodi

Back in the winery Manetti is fully cognizant of a group of seasoned journalists and sommeliers having visited more than their share of estates so we skip past the stainless steel tanks, barrel cellars and bottling lines to get down to what is really right. Along with John Szabo M.S. (WineAlign partner and author of Volcanic Wines), Brad Royale (WineAlign judge, Wine Director of Rocky Mountain Resorts and most interesting man in Canada) and Steven Robinson (First Ontario Ambassador of Chianti Classico and Sommelier at Atelier Restaurant in Ottawa) we talk amphora with Giovanni. Much experimentation is taking place at Fontodi even while much of the world may not associate their iconic sangiovese with this sort of side work. Along with decades of producing tiles, the hand-made wine Amphoras manufactured by Manetti Gusmano & Figli are the result of eight generations of experience in the production of Cotto and high quality handmade terracotta.

What makes the Manetti Amphorae special is the uniqueness of the clay; the abundant presence of Galestro in the terroir of  Chianti Classico, the salts and the calcium carbonates confer the right microporosity, enabling the wine to breathe correctly. This feature, the antioxidant and antibacterial action and the high thermal insulation capacity make the terracotta Amphora  an ideal tool for the production of great natural wines. Fontodi and natural wines. Another partnership so worth exploring.

Fontodi vineyards in the Conco d’oro, Panzano

After the amphora we sit down to taste through the wines of Fontodi. There are good solid sessions and then there is the kind of catechetical research afforded with a proud and humble man of Giovanni Manetti’s stature. First the presentation and sangiovese appetite whetting pour of Meriggio, a sauvignon blanc from the Colli Toscana Centrale, a rest in the shade, “and as for compensation, there’s little he would ask.” Then the Chianti Classico from Fontodi and neighbouring Lamole in Greve in Chianti, for perspective and contrast. Manetti gets down to the greatest of Chianti Classico/Toscana IGT contrastive verticals with eight vintages of Vigna del Sorbo (now labeled as Gran Selezione) and Flaccianello della Pieve. When asked what he thinks of the Chianti Classico Gran Selezione category moving to 100 per cent sangiovese he laughs. “What do I think of the idea? It’s my idea!” The notes will explain the rest.

Fontodi Meriggio 2016, Colli Toscana Centrale IGT, Italy (WineAlign)

Meriggio is 100 per cent La Rota vineyard sauvignon blanc, whole cluster pressed with native yeasts, 75 per cent stainless steel ferment, no malo, 15 per cent in amphora and 10 per cent in French barriques. That said, without temperature control some malo, like it, happens. To go to Meriggio means to go and have a rest in the shade, from the verb meriggiare in reference to the (not Tuscan) poet Eugenio Montale, “merrigiare pallidio e assorto.” Empty is the literal translation but it’s more a case of the unoccupied mind at rest. Sauvignon should always be so calm and yet spirited, here with little to no oxidative character but rather metallurgy, saltiness and pure tang. The leesy reductive environment and Panzano acidity conspire with calcaire for a demonstrative locution. Bloody delicious sauvignon blanc for the man in me. Drink 2017-2022.  Tasted September 2017

Sangiovese of Fontodi

Fontodi Chianti Classico 2014, Tuscany, Italy (933317, $36.95, WineAlign)

No surprise here from stalwart Fontodi, to take a difficult vintage, push vanity aside and select the best fruit for a pure expression of sangiovese, natural and organically made, with precision and clarity. The red Panzano fruit spikes with cran-pom-rasp-currant bursting freshness. It’s just the right amount of tart and sapid, carefully rippling in acidity. So well made. Drink 2018-2022.  Tasted February and September 2017  #Fontodi  rogersandcompanywines    @rogcowines  Az. Agr. Fontodi  #fontodi

Fontodi Chianti Classico Filetta Di Lamole 2014, Tuscany, Italy (Agent, $35.95, WineAlign)

The old Lamole winery is owned by Giovanni Manetti’s cousins, where the grandfather made important wines until he passed away in the 80s and the grapes were then sold to bulk. Then Giovanni began working with the family in the 2000s and this first vintage was ready because the finesse of 2014 spoke to him, to begin the new journey. This has seriously improved, settled, come together, developed its excellence with seven months added in time to bottle. Its characters of amaro, earth and texture are now as one, inseparable and fully vested in the calm. Drink 2017-2023.  Last tasted September 2017

From the “forgotten corner of Chianti Classico,” Lamole of Greve in Chianti is perched in a natural amphitheatre between Volpaia to the south and Panzano to the west. Some of the vineyard’s older vines are still pruned in the alberello (bush) style. This is Giovanni Manetti’s inaugural vintage of the Filetta in cohorts with his cousin. So, decidedly a diffident partner and opposing force to the Fontodi Annata because the earthy-subterranean dwelling aromatics brood beneath the red, verging to riper and darker fruit. There is a liquor, aperitif amaro-ness to the Lamole. The clay must be darker and more compressed. The balance is struck though on deeper, more brooding and warmer alcohol-felt lines and in 2014, as if it were a Riserva. It’s an oak “vessel’ aged 100 per cent sangiovese, as opposed to other the estate’s usual use of barriques. It is perhaps counterintuitive but this acts more evolved than the “normale.” Neither better or worse but enjoyment time is now.  Tasted February 2017

Father and son- Giovanni and Bernardo Manetti @fontodi #panzano #chianticlassico

Fontodi Chianti Classico Gran Selezione Vigna Del Sorbo 2014, Tuscany, Italy (Agent, $83.95, WineAlign)

The older vines are between 52 and 54 years old, the first vintage being 1985 and until 2011, contained some cabernet sauvignon, vines that have since been pulled out. The now site-specific, 100 per cent sangiovese Vigna del Sorbo may have been muscular in 2012 but no such hyperbole exists in 2014. The vintage determined this and despite the deep black cherry chalkiness the true spirit and stripped down honesty of sangiovese is in display. Purity has returned, floral like an artistically-rendered natural, realist and perpetual field of flowers in bloom, in installation, of violet light and rose-scented glass. I can imagine drinking this for decades, with its albarese-galestro saltiness and effortless concentration. Sometimes sangiovese never relents and at the same time never tires. Meraviglioso. Drink 2020-2038.  Tasted September 2017

Fontodi Chianti Classico Gran Selezione Vigna Del Sorbo 2013, Tuscany, Italy (Agent, $81.00, WineAlign)

Fontodi Chianti Classico Gran Selezione Vigna del Sorbo 2013. (Takes deep breath). Just imagine a box filled with all things sangiovese, in all its incarnations and permutations, each aspect teaching something about what you need to know. History, legacy and tradition. Risk taking, forward thinking and progress. What is learned (in retrospect) from two poles; heat and power (2012) and cool savour and elegance (2014). The ’13 is not a matter of being in between but rather an exceptionality, a sangiovese of energy, precision, clarity, purity and a pure reflection in the window of honesty. Everything this vineyard can offer is in the 2013; florals, herbs, fruit, acidity and fine, fine tannin. All in, together, as one. Perhaps its best years will end sooner than 2014 but the time spent will be unparalleled. Drink 2019-2035.  Tasted September 2017

Fontodi Chianti Classico Vigna Del Sorbo 1986, Tuscany, Italy (AgentWineAlign)

Fontodi’s Vigna del Sorbo was obviously not a Gran Selezione designated Chianti Classico in 1986 but it was at the top of the pyramid. A sangiovese in which the acids and fine pear bitters stir in the tray, with a fruit from the (Sorbo) tree that was used to mix with grapes for Vin Santo. Not any more. In 2017 the freshness is impossible, implausible, perpetuated in the most floral and fine acidity combination of any older sangiovese ever experienced. This is like sucking on the most perfect lozenge of fruit, salt, mineral and Panzano mystery. This is Panzano sapidity perfectly realized, preserved and expressed. There is a touch of Cassis, less pyrazine but you can detect the cabernet sauvignon character, even in 10 per cent but combined with sangiovese it’s this frutta di bosco feeling. Just fantastic. Drink 2017-2023.  Tasted September 2017

#nebuchadnezzar @fontodi #flaccianello

Fontodi Flaccianello della Pieve 2014, Tuscany, Italy (Agent $125.00, SAQ 12123921, $97.25, WineAlign)

Flaccianello comes off of a different slope, aspect and exposition than Vigna del Sorbo, here facing straight south, collecting all the sun it can in the golden glow of the Conca d’Oro. The richness celebrates the legacy of this 100 per cent sangiovese, once so atypical and untraditional back in 1981, now the most legacy defining there may just be for varietal Panzano and for the territory in the sense of the greater good. Pure, nonpartisan just, unadulterated and perfectly powerful sangiovese with length from Firenze to Siena and back. Drink 2021-2036.  Tasted September 2017

Fontodi Flaccianello della Pieve 2013, Tuscany, Italy (Agent $125.00, SAQ 12123921, $97.25, BCLDB 55392, $109.99, WineAlign)

The Flaccianello is the Fontodi expression of uva nostrala, “our grape,” explains Giovanni Manneti, the most important local variety owned by Chianti Classico, protected and exalted by Fontodi. Sangiovese the solo act that must define Gran Selezione, to explain what is Chianti Classico in its purest form and to separate how it grows and what wine it produces, particularly when you are to compare it from commune to commune. This Flaccianello separates itself from the Vigna del Sorbo vineyard and Gran Selezione category, even from itself, with another bonafide elegant layer of Conca d’Oro stratified limestone richness and this ultra-savoury umami level of minty-herbal intensity. What else is there to say? Drink 2020-2034.  Tasted September 2017

Fontodi Flaccianello della Pieve 2006, Tuscany, Italy (WineAlign)

Tell it to the vintage perhaps but 2006 is so very floral, more than any Flaccianello in the memory bank and expressly sangiovese in temper. It’s a year with massive tannins and extreme acidity. For these reasons there is a tightness of being and even at 10-plus years it’s silly young to work with but the concentration impresses. Fruit at a premium indicates some citrus, in orange and lemon with compound interest calculated in further variegated acidity. The most sapid Flaccianello of them all has 15 years more initial development ahead before true secondary character will take over. It’s amazing when you stop to think about sangiovese of such structure. Drink 2019-2031.  Tasted April 2017

Fontodi Flaccianello della Pieve 2005, Tuscany, Italy (WineAlign)

“This is the vintage I open when I host a party or an important dinner, because no one asks me to open it.” The words are Giovanni Manetti’s and for him none truer are spoken, with a smile. The younger vines and super-selection from the “Bricco” part of the top of the hill in the exceptional vineyard make for a sangiovese of fine-grained tannin plus what the smallest berries of the smallest bunches gift. Their integration with wood has become a matter of balance, in terms of delicasse, even while supported by such structure. Secondary character is happening, in herbal, balmy and savoury, slightly pulsed and edging into balsamico. But it’s such a gentle and slow-sliding slope, years yet away from tertiary. Drink 2017-2026.  Tasted September 2017

Fontodi Flaccianello della Pieve 1986, Tuscany, Italy (WineAlign)

Flaccianello in 1986 is actually though not surprisingly so different from Vigna del Sorbo, more than any other reason because of the cabernet sauvignon, but in a more philosophical way, because they have built a paradox, from the Super Tuscan ideal in revolution. Now the sangiovese going forward will be the most important and also the best wine, like looking back at this 1986, OK, not better than Sorbo but purer, honest, a clearer picture from which to learn from and ultimately a model for the future. Beautiful power, restraint, structure and yes, the kind of wine that deserves to be praised with the term elegance, overused, or not. Perfectly rustic, earthy and full of fruit with its accompanying complimentary, enervating and necessary acidity. Drink 2017-2023.  Tasted September 2017

In @chianticlassico mano nella mano 1986, @fontodi #vignadelsorbo & #flaccianello thank you Giovanni Manetti for sharing these two opposing forces of the Tuscan paradox #chianticlassico

Good to Go!

Godello

Twitter: @mgodello

Instagram: mgodello

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A Sordo affair

Sordo – I Fantastici 8 Crus di Barolo 2013

On Thursday, July 13, 2017 an event dedicated to  the “Fantastic 8 cru of Barolo 2013” was held at the farm of Giorgio Sordo. The program included a guided visit to the historic part of the 1912 cellar, the modern 2016 cellar and a tasting of Sordo’s eight Crus di Barolo, attended by experts, opinion leaders, sommeliers, influencers and journalists from all over the world. Senior Sordo Enologist Ernesto Minasso introduced the Sordo terroir and then Ian D’Agata took over, Scientific Director of Vinitaly and the Wine Project of the Collisioni Festival. The teachings of (Armando) Cordero were invoked, in discussion of respect for what each site can deliver, in working them exactly the same way, so that what you are left with is a true sense of each site, to recall an Ontario “climat” terminology, a Barolo somewhereness if you will, tells Mr. D’Agata. Sitting there, listening to these introductions and pronouncements, self says to self  “let’s see about these things.” A dinner followed, prepared at the hands of Chef Danilo Lorusso of La Crota di Roddi.

The two soil epochs of Barolo are divided by a diagonal line that runs from the northeast down to the southwest, drawn between Roddi and Grinzane through Castiglione Falletto down through Barolo and to Novello. The appellation’s two soil types are Tortonian and Serravallian (or Helvetian), both of which were formed millions of years ago and each are responsible for producing different styles of nebbiolo. La Morra and Barolo to the west are lands less compact and more fertile and the general consensus puts these nebbioli in the realms of the elegant and more (relatively) amenable. In and around Serralunga d’Alba, Monforte and Castiglione Falletto, the Serravallian is marked by dense, compact marl and the Barolo there tends to greater body and alcohol, ideal for a potential to longer aging.

La Morra’s famous cru include Arborina, Brunate, Cerequio, Gattera, Gianchi, Marcenasco and Rocche dell’Annunziata. Barolo’s are Bricco Viole, Brunate, Cannubi, Cannubi Boschis, Sarmassa, Via Nuova, Rue and San Lorenz0. In Castiglione Falletto there are Bricco Rocche, Villero, Monprivato, Fiasc, Mariondino, Pira and Ravera. In Serralunga d’Alba the Cru include Falletto, Francia, Marenca, Vigna Rionda, Marenca-Rivette, La Serra, Margheria, Ornato and Parafada. Monforte d’Alba holds the vineyards of Bussia, Cicala, Colonnello, Dardi, Ginestra, Mosconi, Munie, Romirasco and Santo Stefano.

The official recognition of the DOC Barolo happened in 1966 and the DOCG followed, in 1980. The grape variety is 100 per cent nebbiolo in a production zone covering the entire township of three villages; Barolo, Serralunga d’Alba and Castiglione Falletto, plus part of the territory of eight other small townships.  Sordo’s excellent eight are what the parlance of Barolo times would refer to as “sorì”, or Menzione Geografica Aggiuntiva (MGA), or individual vineyard names. There are more than 100 officially recognized MGAs in Barolo.

Sordo’s eight cru are spread across 53 hectares, 80 per cent cultivated to nebbiolo, plus dolcetto, barbera, arneis, chardonnay, viognier and sauvignon blanc. The total production is 350,000 bottles, with vineyards subsidized by grass and ground cover between the rows. No chemicals though sulphur is used, with stainless steel ferments, élevage in large Slavonian oak casks, further time in bottle of six months, 36 for riserva. The vintage 2013 saw a warm, dry winter, above average in that regard, a cold March, rainy spring, warm summer and dry fall. A 15 day harvest was executed across October. Here are the notes on the eight 2013 cru plus three extras poured with dinner.

Sordo Barolo Monvigliero 2013, DOCG Piemonte, Italy (459677, $47.95, WineAlign)

Monvigliero might very well be considered the “Grand Cru” of Verduno village, facing south/south east at 280-320 metres above sea level. The soils are loose, fine and dry marls and in 2013 the harvest happened on the 12th of October. The first vintage was 2005, from a cru set on the west side of the diagonal line drawn between Roddi and Grinzane through Castiglione Falletto down south west through Barolo and to Novello. Here the make up is more (relatively) fertile Tortonian epoch soils, facilitator of earlier developing Baroli. The comparison might be to Paulliac and Saint-Estèphe, to nebbiolo needing four to six years before entering the drinking window. Every producer that owns parcels in Monvigliero ends up with a top three Barolo portfolio cru from within. Here the Sordo ’13 is so very perfumed, of violet and rose petal, certainly an aromatic potpourri, light in hue and transparent, with texture, sour acidity as of cherry, not yet into the tar. The pearls of magnesium rich marly liquid rubies run amok in the mouth. Returning after tasting the last three (Rocche, Villero and Monprivato) musketeers this now shows how lithe, lovely and accessible (relatively speaking of course) this Monvigliero really is. There are 12,900 bottles made. Drink 2020-2029.  Tasted July 2017  sordowine  collisioni  @sordo_wine  @Collisioni  @SordoVini  @CollisioniFestival

Sordo Barolo Ravera 2013, DOCG Piemonte, Italy (AgentWineAlign)

Ravera is on the eastern slope of the township of Novello, also left bank of the diagonal soil epoch dividing line and like Monvigliero, facing south/southeast. Cuts more attitude and altitude, between 420-450 masl. Loose but richer, whitish marl and grey soils typify the cru. The Ravera harvest was on the 19th October, leading to 20,500 bottles and its first vintage was also 2005. It shows more austerity than Monvigliero, owing to being characterized by Serravallian soils found on the right bank, so this is the cru with an identity complex. This is compact, grippy, intense, sour wrapped up in a mystery folded into an enigma. A reticent, brooding hidden gemstone and texture of compression Sordo, but hard to get. Will unravel and work into its flesh no sooner than six plus years on. From a Ravera sweet spot but it’s not sweet now, nor are some other renditions. A return (30 minutes later) brings the unmistakeable nose of fennel. Drink 2022-2032.  Tasted July 2017

Sordo Barolo Perno 2013, DOCG Piemonte, Italy (AgentWineAlign)

Perno belongs to Monforte d’Alba and this particular single-vineyard portion (6.6 hectares of 190.96 total hectares in the large cru) is owned entirely by Sordo, though others farm the rest. Vines age from 15-35 years-old, on red soils with stones and it was the 18th of October for this harvest. The first vintage was 2000. Only Bussia and San Pietro are bigger in all of Barolo so there will be some variegation coming from the Cru. Located on the right bank, immediately to the east of the diagonal line, into Serravallian soils, of calcareous limestone and compacted sands. It’s bloody tannic, but aromatically speaking it does in fact speak its mind, of a fine porous vessel holding a sparked and stark, bitter and macerating cherry liqueur. The palate follows sharp and piercing, compressed, intense, of powerful structure and endless length. Brooding and massive but harnessed power that could run a small nation-state. That power never relents though a silk road certainly runs through that country. There were 48,000 bottles produced. Drink 2024-2036.  Tasted July 2017

Sordo Barolo Gabutti 2013, DOCG Piemonte, Italy (AgentWineAlign)

Gabutti (Serralunga d’Alba) sits at 250-300 masl, in compacted clay with 1989 being the first vintage. It ranges to the far east set into the quintessential seravalian soil and try hard to argue against the idea that it is the cru almost impossible to figure young. Sordo submits to its potential as unlimited and outrageous. There are spice aromas and acidity up front but otherwise it slams the door, locked tight. I disagree with Id’A in that the nose is not floral and accessible but do agree that it is civilized, on the first wave of palate, with soaking cherries and the idea of tar. Then the clutch sticks, it breaks down and shuts down. Wait 10 years from harvest with proof provided that 30 minutes does nothing to allow a Gabutti relent. It does indeed show some further precison when you get back to the back palate. Ultimately there can be little to say but that the jury is so fully out on Gabutti. There were 26,000 bottles made. Drink 2023-2035.  Tasted July 2017

Sordo Barolo Parussi 2013, DOCG Piemonte, Italy (AgentWineAlign)

Parussi comes from Castiglione Falletto at an elevation of 270-290 masl, with 15-40 year-old vines on loose surface soil and limestone with whitish, grey marls. The harvest was the 15th of October and the first vintage goes back to 2005. Sordo farms 1.8 of a small (13.4) hectares but the whole cru is not suited to nebbiolo, so only 83 per cent is planted to the grape. We are to understand that the idea goes beyond Parussi in that only certain portions are truly nebbiolo-Barolo cru territory. Parussi is from the crossroads of two soil epochs, between Barolo and Monforte and Serralunga to the south and east. The questions is asked whether or not it achieves a balance, of two banks on either side of a diagonal epoch line, like St. Julien, part Margaux and part Paulliac. It does but certainly resides on the brightest side, with the most fruit. The tart cherries are possessive of this striking personality so that they achieve a suspended animated moment in which they equilibrate to sweetness tempered by sour acidity moments and great fineness of demanding tannin. There are 13,000 bottles. Drink 2022-2034.  Tasted July 2017

Vitello Tonnato at Sordo

Sordo Barolo Rocche Di Castiglione 2013, DOCG Piemonte, Italy (AgentWineAlign)

Also from Castiglione Falletto is Rocche Di Castiglione, a formidable nebbiolo from 30-60 years of vine age, including a 1960’s planting. The elevation creeps up to 300-350 masl, on white and blue marl with dry and compacted sandstone. Harvest was on the 17th of October and production goes back to 1987 in this, Sordo’s first original cru. One of the greatest vineyards in all of Barolo, the new name is now Rocche di Castiglione Falletto, a place of crooked cragges or peaks, the altitude delivering more power and structure, but also grace and refinement. This is nebbiolo of a cooler climate personality, wound so tight, with sour cherry, rose petal and so much fruitier on the nose, certainly more than Villero. There is this smooth, satiny consistency through the modernity of flavours on the oldest fruit. A great dichotomy achieved. Drink 2023-2040.  Tasted July 2017

Sordo Barolo Villero 2013, DOCG Piemonte, Italy (AgentWineAlign)

Villero is an accumulation of purchased grapes from a farmer who follows a strict regimen. The cru is composed of calcareous, grey marls and compact grey sand and in this first 2013 vintage the later harvest was the 20th of October. Almost dukes it out with Rocche, this second of three musketeers with Castiglione and Monprivato. A balanced locale submits to make for optimum equilibrium for nebbiolo cru, looking at it this early as big, brawny, stiff and strong in its austerity. Giving so little away and yet it’s all imagination, driven by time. The cru is 22 hectares large with Sordo owning 0.4 and change, very small but it’s a true nebbiolo vineyard. Villero is nothing if not erected as a wall of acidity and tannin, so intensely taut, wound and as of yet, unforgiving. There are 3,600 bottles. Drink 2024-2039.  Tasted July 2017

Sordo Barolo Monprivato 2013, DOCG Piemonte, Italy (AgentWineAlign)

Monprivato is the third of the Castiglione Falletto cru, at variegated elevations from 240-320 masl. Sordo’s are 40 year-old vines and in this inaugural 2013 it was picked earlier (than Villero) on the 17th of October. Another true representative of Serravallian epoch austerity, with formidable tannin and a get down on my knees and beg to ask for more time before delivering accessibility. One of the true great Barolo vineyards, 98 per cent planted to nebbiolo. The 7.12 hectare large site gifts somewhere between the structure of Villero and the richness of Rocche. You get spice and sour cherry right away but also some other fruit in spice format, mulled in a way, of orange rind, apricot and pomegranate. It’s as if a piece of La Tâche suddenly became available to be farmed by someone else. Such fineness and nobility of tannins, richness and fine bitters, in the end the most tonic of all. This may be the whole package, a compromise in a way but an impressive and charming nebbiolo like no other. There are 3,200 bottles. Drink 2023-2040.  Tasted July 2017

More Sordo

Sordo Roero Arneis Garblet Sué 2016, DOCG Piemonte, Italy (AgentWineAlign)

Garblet Sué is on the Bricco Fiasco, a Castiglione Falletto vineyard owing in name to the Garbelletto Superiore farm that lies below. Sordo’s roero is rich in metallurgy, orchard fruit purity sporting equal parts pear and citrus, almost but not quite savoury. The balance of fruit, soil and salty mineral melts into arneis tannin. Overall it’s simply suave and polished stuff. Drink 2017-2021.  Tasted July 2017

Sordo Barolo Rocche Di Castiglione 2011, DOCG Piemonte, Italy (AgentWineAlign)

It’s difficult to say and even harder to admit that ’11 Rocche is any further advanced than the ’13 tasted 90 minutes prior. The fruit is a bit riper and if development can be quantified it’s a matter of millimetres by cru standards. And so the sour cherry is sweetened, rendered with more baking spice caress and attention to length, elastically so and with precise action. Five years further on and it will fall effortlessly into its next perfect phase, in a place called beautiful. Drink 2021-2032.  Tasted July 2017

Sordo Riserva Barolo Gabutti Edizione Limitata 2006, DOCG Piemonte, Italy (AgentWineAlign)

Sometimes it’s just a case of instant recognition, of the transparent Barolo-nebbiolo purity, crowned by acidity read from a very particular cru vernacular, spoken without any interference. At this 11-year itch, which incidentally seems only a year or two shy of the optimum window, Gabutti runs just a touch hot. A minor distraction in bitter phenol is balanced by ripe Sordo fruit that when combined acts like a salve melting on a tongue coated with tannin. Can formidable and elegant co-exist? In Gabutti, yes they can, easily, readily and in truth. Drink 2018-2028.  Tasted July 2017

Good to go!

Godello

Twitter: @mgodello

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Rewriting history at Meerlust back to 1984, one vintage at a time

Not just #meerlust more like major lust. Thank you for the sexy time travel @meerlustwine Laurel Keenan and The South African Wine Society.

It was on September 12th, 2017 that a once in a lifetime South African vertical tasting happened. The South African Wine Society managed to acquire 10 Meerlust wines from nine vintages gathered over 15 years. In Toronto. At The University of Toronto Faculty Club. It’s not that I want to invoke the dystopian dread of George Orwell nor do I equate the master’s writing with the wines of Meerlust but tasting 1984 through to 2010 has provoked the linguistic drama in me to invoke some wordsmith parallels. “Who controls the past controls the future. Who controls the present controls the past.” Winemaker Chris Williams may not totally disagree.

Few Cabernet Sauvignon vertical tastings are capable of determining such a clear picture in style, patterning and evolution, save for perhaps for obvious reasons what is possible out of Bordeaux. This focused collection from Meerlust connected past to present and with no real South African presence in the room. A 25-minute video presentation by Williams and the wines were all the 75 guests in attendance had to go on. By the time the winemaker had sped-tasted and rapid-dissected the nine vintages most of the four-ounce pours in the room were drained. It was a quick to state of bliss happy bunch.

Meerlust dates back to 1693, the house that is “love or pleasure of the sea.” Less than five kms south from the Atlantic Ocean, the property was purchased in 1756 and to this day remains family owned, now in its eighth generation with 260 years of continuity. On the 3rd July 1693, the Governor of the Cape, Simon van der Stel, granted the land to Henning Hüsing, who named the farm Meerlust, describing the sense of pleasure he obtained from the sea breezes that blew inland from False Bay. Johannes Albertus Myburgh bought Meerlust in January 1757. His ownership marked the foundation of the Myburgh Dynasty.

Hannes Myburgh, eighth generation owner of Meerlust, graduated from the University of Stellenbosch with a Bachelor of Arts degree majoring in French and English in 1982, before studying winemaking at Geisenheim in Germany. Hannes worked at Chateau Lafite in France and von Oetinger in Germany. Chris Williams was appointed Cellar Master at Meerlust in 2004 but has worked as Assistant Winemaker for the farm since 1995. He studied Oenology at Elsenberg and gained international experience in France while working for Michel Rolland. He is assisted by Wilson Waterboer and the cellar team.

Remarkable history and longevity through 10 back vintages of @meerlustwine #rubicon with the South African Wine Society. Thank you LK for the generous treat.

Rubicon is Meerlust’s flagship wine and considered one of South Africa’s premier Bordeaux Blend reds, first made in 1980. This vertical of nine vintages included 1996, 2001, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008  and 2009. I’ve added 2010, tasted recently through Ontario’s VINTAGES release program. In addition, we tasted cabernet sauvignon 2004, infrequently made, the previous time in 1993. This is the prime ingredient to the Bordeaux blend, usually making up around 60 per cent of the wine, with merlot, cabernet franc (and from 2008 on), petit verdot added. Thank you to Laurel Keenan of Wines of South Africa Canada, for having me and to Eleanor Cosman of the South African Wine Society, for hosting. Here are the notes.

Meerlust Rubicon 2010, Wo Stellenbosch, South Africa (64329, $37.95, WineAlign)

Meerrlust’s iconic blend is a Stellenbosch essential, of the ripest fruit and fully-rendered barrel. I’m quite amazed at its uncanny ability to appeal, even at this seven year mark, a show of generosity and gregarious character almost unparalleled for a wine of its Western Cape ilk. The geology runs deep, neither reductive, sap-flowing or bouncy, but the mineral sear and streak is certainly there. This Rubicion trades fecundity for earthy chocolate, uncompromising and unapologetic in its frosting. Beef is a must, preferably rare and dark from high heat char. Dry-aged and or Wagyu would pair even better. The blend is 62 per cent cabernet sauvignon, (24) merlot, (12) cabernet franc and (2) petit verdot. Drink 2017-2021.  Tasted February 2017

Meerlust Rubicon 2009, Wo Stellenbosch, South Africa (WineAlign)

Winemaker Chris Williams forged the people’s Rubicon in 2009, a Bordeaux blend as recognizable in name and style as much as any produced in not only South Africa, but worldwide. Everything is attractive in 2009, beginning with these quite lovely liquid dusty, rich mulberry and deep plum notes. To a crowd of 75 it can’t help but be the standout of general consensus for its sheer restrained hedonism and unabashed beauty. Youth has so much to do with how this shows but believe me 2009 is just a baby, so much more so than 2008 and they are only a year apart. The blend is 70 per cent cabernet sauvignon, (20) merlot, (9) cabernet franc and (1) petit verdot. Drink 2019-2027.  Tasted September 2017

Meerlust Rubicon 2008, Wo Stellenbosch, South Africa (WineAlign)

The 2008 is the first vintage with some petit verdot in the mix though it’s just a start, with one per cent to go along in a blend of (71) cabernet sauvignon, (19) merlot and (9) cabernet franc. Shows some volatility and also more wood in the context of an espresso-chocolate continuum. Here a deeply hematic and iron schisty Rubicon, intense, brooding, mineral well dug deep into the terroir. This goes strong and powerful up the sides of the tongue with that fine but intense acidity. Unquestioned as a fine wine with lots of wood derived chocolate flavours but the spice is all fruit and the tannin from off of that fruit. Massive structure and age possibility will go well into the twenties. Drink 2017-2027.  Last tasted September 2017.

Rubber dust, road macadam and strawberry jam. Fierce Bordeaux Blend home from a hot climate. This has gritty obduracy and doggedness. Like a red blend with a gun, walking the mean streets. Acidity shot through the roof. Bordeaux meets South Africa in every shared, resplendent and promising way. Rasping tannins contain bursting dark fruit, the grain running in multiple directions. Respect. Wait two more years on this and drink comfortably past 2020. Tasted November 2014

Meerlust Rubicon 2007, Wo Stellenbosch, South Africa (WineAlign)

Rubicon 2007 is the last to be made without any petit verdot (74 per cent cabernet sauvignon, (15) merlot and (11) cabernet franc) and is actually not too dissimilar to ’06 though truly lighter and with more high bright intensity. It is also possessive of that collective ropey, red dusty cured and dried fruit character, like what can happen with traditionally adhered to sangiovese and tempranillo. So really when you think about it this shares a style, at least in part with more than its Bordeaux cousins. Yet go and ask winemaker Chris Williams and he’ll tell you “I dont think this wine could be made anywhere else because of terroir and history.” Fair enough. Surely the winemaker knows. Drink 2017-2026.  Tasted September 2017

Meerlust Rubicon 2006, Wo Stellenbosch, South Africa (WineAlign)

Rubicon is one of the original South African Bordeaux blends, here in 2006 with merlot and cabernet franc to satisfy the blended needs of cabernet sauvignon. The blend is 74 per cent cabernet sauvignon, (8) merlot and (18) cabernet franc. This ’06 is a bit shy, reserved, not giving much away from its usual floral heights. There is a layering of palate density before then deriving its complexity through the alleys of acidity, tannin and structure. Still so far from coming around but this reminds me of that salty, saline and mineral 1996. Drink 2017-2022.  Tasted September 2017

Meerlust Rubicon 2005, Wo Stellenbosch, South Africa (WineAlign)

In 2005 the blend (69 per cent cabernet sauvignon, (15) merlot and (16) cabernet franc) saw an increase of cabernet franc, likely because of heat units and a vintage-driven jamminess exhibited by the cabernet sauvignon. The result is a cooler, increased savoury blend with a rising of steroidal currants so very sapid in a pool of high acidity. It’s the most lucent Rubicon, almost luminescent though not quite transparent, still so vital, pulsating and nearly raging in its wild, twitchy edgy energy, even beastly and in the end, just a bit out of balance. Like a Steve Vai riff in Zappa mode. Then again, the, Rubicon ’05, anything but a flex able leftover or quaint little wine might tell me, “I’m the beast of love and you just got in my way.” Drink 2017-2025.  Tasted September 2017

Meerlust Rubicon 2004, Wo Stellenbosch, South Africa (WineAlign)

Rubicon 2004 is a completely different animal, with animale musk and a deep, dark and brooding constitution. The blend is 63 per cent cabernet sauvignon, (27) merlot and (10) cabernet franc. Shows 13 years on as the young (Chris Williams) winemaker’s ambitious first solo effort, while the wood was once so obviously in power of demand, it’s now ameliorated and integrated. This must have taken some time to come around, perhaps as recent as a year or two ago. Rubicon has been produced since 1980, was previuosly a matter of cabernet sauvignon, now here with more cabernet franc than before. Drink 2017-2025.  Tasted September 2017

Meerlust Rubicon 2003, Wo Stellenbosch, South Africa (WineAlign)

Rubicon 2003 was made by Chris Williams’ predecessor Giorgio Dalla Cia and from ’04 on they are made by Williams. The blend is 69 per cent cabernet sauvignon, (19) merlot and (12) cabernet franc. From a long hot dry sumer, a classic Rubicon, again with some lovely complexity out of the shadow of volatility, more savour here and cedar, plus pencil lead and graphite. In the freshest of ways this is closer to the present stylistic of Rubicon and Stellenbosh and further away than 1996. It’s the transition from old to new, with concentrated black currant, Cassis and wine gum. Not quite tertiary bit meaty char, balsamic, fennel and mushroom are just around the corner. Drink 2017-2020.  Tasted September 2017

Meerlust Rubicon 2001, Wo Stellenbosch, South Africa (WineAlign)

2001, a warmer vintage is the assumption, with its wood still in play and tannins truly continuing their assertion. Giorgio dalla Cia fashioned a truly proportioned blend, of 70 per cent cabernet sauvignon with equal parts merlot and cabernet franc. While it can’t hide from its ocean salinity and omnipresent terroir it is a stand out vintage because of new world opulence. I’m not sure there will be another Rubicon in this tasting or at any opportunistic time that will make one dream so vividly of Bordeaux (i.e Château Pichon Longueville Baron) but also Napa Valley (i.e. Opus One). The structure in this Rubicon is purely Stellenbosch and with its merlot/cabernet franc proportion it’s quite intriguing, especially because of the warmth and how dramatically this foreshadows how franc will become more important in the blend as the years progress by. A fantastic wine Drink 2017-2021.  Tasted September 2017

Meerlust Rubicon 1996, Wo Stellenbosch, South Africa (WineAlign)

In 1996 Chris Williams was a junior winemaker (to Giorgio della Cia) at the time but he remembers the vintage well. The blend is 70 per cent cabernet sauvignon, (20) merlot and (10) cabernet franc, from a cool vintage, here still dishing some Brettanomyces. It’s in check and so kind, gentle and helps to fixate towards thinking it a a sleeper vintage sort of personality There is much savour, still fruit (mulberry and plum), lots of acidity in quite a sour patch candy way but really dry and intense.Plenty of sediment! Very much alive with the silty, salty, but not fine pearly tannin. This falls into the saline-savoury style with wood just a dream from long ago, though admittedly a bit too pungent and earthy. Drink 2017-2019.  Tasted September 2017

Meerlust Rubicon 1984, Wo Stellenbosch, South Africa (WineAlign)

Meerlust dates back to 1693, the house that is “love or pleasure of the sea.” Less than five kms south from the Atlantic Ocean, the property was purchased in 1756 and to this day remains family owned, now in its eighth generation with 260 years of continuity. Rubicon 1984 is poured (with brilliant decision making) from magnum and is therefore fresher than the 1996 with an incredibly controlled level of fineness in tannin, from acidity and at the threshold of understood volatility. “Perhaps one did not want to be loved so much as to be understood,” like this early Rubicon. The future of Meerlust is foretold with Orwellian transparency, bold honesty and expert ability. “Who controls the past controls the future.” Drink 2017-2019.  Tasted September 2017

Meerlust Cabernet Sauvignon 2004, Wo Stellenbosch, South Africa (283390, $29.95, WineAlign)

Meerlust’s solo cabernet sauvignon ’04 is not merely very much alive it’s still full of bright fruit, though the wood is more noticeable than on the Rubicon. It is the lack of cabernet franc more than anything that seems to be the reason. The ganache component is highly significant, a chocolate factor magnified but still the Meerlust acidity drives the machine. Ripe and ripping with tannins still very much in charge, this wouldn’t be harmed by the generous and patient affording of more time so that it may further evolve to become the pleasing red it knows it will be. Drink 2017-2024.  Tasted September 2017

Not just #meerlust more like major lust. Thank you for the sexy time travel @meerlustwine Laurel Keenan and The South African Wine Society.

Good to go!

Godello

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Flights in and out of Niagara, ere Terroir

The Niagara crew getting a load of #BallsFalls in Jordan

In May of 2017 the 12th annual Terroir Symposium brought many magnificent folk to Ontario. They were dreamers, disruptors, international luminaries, thought leaders, visionaries, creative influencers, innovators, chefs, hoteliers, drink experts, writers and business leaders. With VQA Wines of Ontario and the Wine Marketing Association of Ontario as chaperone, a dozen of these invitees flew from Billy Bishop Airport to Niagara District Airport for an ante-Terroir Talk Sunday fun day in wine country immersion. I joined Robert Gilvesy, Fiona Beckett, Jeremy Bonia, Magdalena Kaiser, Jamie Drummond, Nikki Bayley, Dick Snyder, Ursula Heinzelmann, Christoph Thörle and Jim Poris for the excursion. In between return nine-seater shuttles we ran through flights at Flat Rock Cellars and Henry of Pelham Estate Winery. Who amongst us was not taken by these VQA wines and their unselfconscious excellence?

First a hot air balloon and now this!!!

After a quick first pit stop at Ball’s Falls to show off Niagara’s famous escarpment limestone to the international contingent, we settled in at Flat Rock to taste six wines with Cellarmaster Allison Findlay. Next it was a dozen at Henry of Pelham Estate Winery with proprietor Daniel Speck, Ryan Corrigan of Rosewood Estates and Suzanne Janke of Stratus Vineyards. A blow your mind lunch was prepared on site by Wellington Court Chefs Erik Peacock and Cait Bermuhler. Here are the notes on the 18 wines.

Revisits with @Winemakersboots and a seven-year Crowned epiphany

At Flat Rock Cellars

Flat Rock Cellars Riddled Sparkling 2010, Méthode Traditionnelle, VQA Twenty Mile Bench, Niagara Escarpment, Ontario (383315, $29.95, WineAlign)

Time makes a difference so here the extended lees age (six months further, to 60) takes Riddled to another level. Considering the cost and attention to time, in the broad realm of traditional method sparkling wine there are some that are given away. Riddled. A whole lot of biscuit warmth, sody saleratus, gingersnap, tart Ida Red apple, breadth and a smile-inducing creamy palate. There is more wisdom and calm from 2010 so do not come around demanding tension and over-exciteability. Think Grower’s Champagne with Ontario heart and soul, dedication and purpose. The extended arm of Madronich-Johnston love is here, this year. It won’t get much better than this. Great length. Drink 2016-2025.  Tasted October 2016, March and May 2017  flatrockcellars  @Winemakersboots  @FlatRockCellars

Flat Rock Cellars Crowned Sparkling Brut 2009, VQA Twenty Mile Bench, Niagara Escarpment, Ontario (Winery, $45.20, WineAlign)

Crowned ’09 was disgorged this spring after seven years on the lees, sealed under crown cap and sent to market with a crowning achievement in mind. Feather gingery, faintly oxidative, this Blanc de Blancs wafts in copper-veined breezes and fennel frond ahead of its palate piercing chardonnay intensity. It delivers a cooler climate interaction than the Riddled, with preserved lemon and please concentrate if you will on it as a wine of heavy forethoughts. What with it resting on its lees, in limbo this long out of practice, necessity and as a result, now fortuitous and of great luck. The animal was created early on and now anything less might be difficult to justify and accept. Plus the bar is raised for the entire Sparkling community. Here the perfect example of low, slow and minute by minute evolution. Only 500 bottles (plus one) were made. Drink 2017-2023.  Tasted May 2017

Flat Rock Cellarmaster Allison Findlay

Flat Rock Cellars Gravity Pinot Noir 2013, VQA Twenty Mile Bench, Niagara Escarpment, Ontario (1560, $30.25, WineAlign)

Flat Rock’s ever involving vines (on 33 hectares planted in 2001 and 2002) enter a new phase with indicators blinking and refreshing in this 2013 Gravity Pinot Noir. Youthful adolescence and gregarious fruit expression initiated in 2010 and carried through the 2012 vintage. Those years saw to a world of astringency and tension relegated to mites in the rear-view mirror. The wine is now in a nexus cross-roaded with exigency holding pattern. To understand its confusion and survey fast forward to its future is not easy. Gravity is a bit large right now, seemingly advanced, but to me the fight is between that fruit abundant state and the return of, though eased by meditative Jedi tension. Gravity just needs a parachute to bring it back down to earth. That lifeline may not materialize in this 2013 but that does not take anything away from its discriminating and diagnostic tones. Brightness, astatic inflection and succulence. This vintage may suffer from some level of snafu but it will age, evolve and breath. That much fruit has to have some level of expectation. The follow up ’14 and ’15 will win the hearts of horses and men. Drink 2016-2021.  Tasted October 2015 and May 2017

Flat Rock Cellars Gravity Pinot Noir 2012, VQA Twenty Mile Bench, Niagara Escarpment, Ontario (1560, $29.95, WineAlign)

Seven months have softened and mothered Gravity’s adolescence in ways to now see it as the most feminine, certainly of the last four vintages. Pretty dabs, perfumes of natural conditioning, warm days and warm nights in the bottle. More accessible than previous takes and of a new modernity perceived. Sweet dreams and sweet fragrances, roses and cinnamon, nothing fancy here mind you, with no bite and no gathering moss. Cherries and vanilla, lavender and simple pleasures. Straight up Gravity, no pull down, no drag and no excess weight. At $30 and from the best barrels, this trumps $40-50 most locales not called Lowery, La Petite Vineyard, Central Otago, Hengst or Pfinstberg. From my earlier, March 2014 note: “In a vintage potentially muddled by warmth and a humidor of radio frequency, duplicating berry phenolics, Flat Rock’s Gravity remains a definitive, signature house Pinot Noir. In 2011, the head of the FR class from its most expressive barrels shared the limelight (and top juice) with the Pond, Bruce and Summit one-offs. In ’12, Gravity’s sandbox was its own. The style is surely dark, extracted, black cherry bent, as per the vintage. Yet only the Rock’s soil does earth in this variegate, borne and elevated by the barrel’s grain. There are no fake plastic trees in a Flat Rock Pinot. “Gravity always wins.”  Last tasted October 2014 and May 2017

Flat Rock The Rusty Shed Chardonnay 2013, VQA Twenty Mile Bench, Niagara Escarpment, Ontario (1552, $24.95, WineAlign)

It’s as if this label had bided all this time to be the benefactor of 2013 fruit. This Rusty Shed, this 20 miler with the track record to age, a wine that sheds baby fat over a 10 year mineral through echelon stratum, in ways few other peninsula to bench chardonnay can do. This Jay Johnston handled surfer of a wine, buoyant and balanced, centred and able to withstand turbulence, oscillation and tidal sway. Here with sumptuous and spiralled fruit gaged in lode intervals and a tartness held in lope and line by a membrane of extract and tannin. Best ever. Showing well, repeatedly and to forecasted repute. Impressing critics and consumers alike. Bravo. Drink 2016-2025.  Tasted June 2016 and May 2017.

Flat Rock Cellars Nadja’s Vineyard Riesling 2015, VQA Twenty Mile Bench, Niagara Peninsula, Ontario (578625, $24.95, WineAlign)

This is an outlier for the Nadja’s Vineyard riesling, with deeper concentration and compression than before. More Mosel and less Twenty Mile in 2015, of light alcohol and an increase in off-dry, extract meets acidity. There have been Nadja’s with more air and exhale but I can’t recall one with such density in vitality. A great Nadja to be sure but of a deferential sort of character. Two or three years should bring it back into its self-imposed and created line. Drink 2018-2024.  Tasted May 2016 and May 2017

VQA wines at Henry of Pelham Estate Winery, May 2017

At Henry of Pelham Estate Winery

Rosewood Estates Gamay Rosé Emerald Shore Vineyard 2016, VQA Creek Shores, Ontario (Winery, $15.95, WineAlign)

The inaugural gamay Rosé is from fourth leaf vines in the spot where the famous sémillon once lived. It delivers essential gamay aromas; strawberry modified with a tisane into raspberry and cherry, salinity clarified and fined. It’s lactic tonal, nicely tart and with a Beamsville mineral, very specific and just this emerald side of intense. Finished dry, but was allowed to go through three quarters malo to bring the cream and the layers. Finished by the incumbent winemaker Ryan Corrigan who once “lived out of a backpack and chased grapes,” committing in fleeting methodology, to northern and southern hemisphere harvests. In 2017 Niagara is all his. Drink 2017-2018.  Tasted May 2017  rosewood wine  @Rosewoodwine  @rosewoodwine

Welcome to @rosewoodwine Ryan Corrigan. Gamay and Cabernet Franc are in fine hands.

Henry Of Pelham Speck Family Reserve Chardonnay 2015, VQA Short Hills Bench, Niagara Peninsula, Ontario (616466, $29.95, WineAlign)

Spice and toast more than anything else come to define the early life of the SPR ’15 chardonnay. Not overtly or overly fruit forward at this (nearing) two-year mark, but green apple, pear and the unusual tangy bite of south asian palm (Salak) snake fruit are just around the corner. This speaks to the phenolic grab and go, the hang time and then that barrel exploit comes through. The palate delivers sappy moments and then the weight of the wine is felt. If texture were quantifiable in aromatics, it would be the SFR that would provide such intellectual fodder to describe what that might feel like. The perfume is layered, chewy, unctuous and viscous. Another year should inflate the fruit and integrate the wood. Drink 2018-2021.  Tasted twice, May and September 2017  henryofpelham  @HenryofPelham  @SpeckBros  @henryofpelham

Wellington Court Chef Erik Peacock and Cait Bermuhler’s appetizer trio

Rosewood Estates Chardonnay Origin 2014, VQA Niagara Peninsula, Ontario (Winery, $28.95, WineAlign)

Rosewood’s Origin 2014 is highly representative of Beamsville chardonnay, pacing a bridge that connects the cool of the climate and the nook in the escarpment’s abutting warmth of the overall Bench. The skins matter, as per the departing winemaking Ross Wise expertise, if only and alt-heightened in elevating texture, but even more so the rusty, soil tart, intensely wound and taut orchard fruit speciality. Drink 2017-2020.  Tasted May 2017

Wellington Court Chef Erik Peacock and Cait Bermuhler’s salt grass point oyster, beet mignonette, cucumber gel, horseradish foam

Stratus Vineyards Stratus White 2013, VQA Niagara Lakeshore, Ontario (660704, $38.20, WineAlign)

There can be little doubt that anticipation would haver to run high for the aromatic, elongated and coolest of Niagara white wine vintages, especially for the chardonnay, but also for the iconic, four-varietal (with sauvignon blanc, sémillon and viognier) blend. The five sensory tenets are solicited and provided for; salty, sour, sweet, briny and umami. The last is exotic and punchy, so this White does it all, speaks for it all and completes it all. It is the most designed and seamless their’s can be.  Last tasted May 2017  stratuswines  @StratusWines  @StratusWines

In 2013 viognier is back in the varietal mix, in reprise of its earlier role in support of chardonnay, sauvignon blanc and riesling. A different sort of vintage here for the White, seemingly led by a circular turning of chardonnay and viognier, like a cat chasing its tail. This really goes round and round with no obvious signs of where it will stop. Quite fleshy and lime juicy with stone fruit flavours in righteous abound. Really amalgamated and seamless even for itself. It is here that I think of it as The White. Niagara’s White. Lake Effect™. Drink 2017-2022.  Tasted November 2016

Rosewood Estates Riesling Origin 2014, VQA Niagara Peninsula, Ontario (Winery, $22.95, WineAlign)

Smells like Bench riesling spirit. The energy comes from the über vineyard’s way of emission, gasseous and vital, linear, introspective and direct. This may just be the most aridity and brine ever teased from a Mima’s riesling, acidity coveting sugar notwithstanding, startling from beginning to end, with spirited shots of lime. Underrated and honest, the consistency of this riesling is possessive of great triggers and so beautifully defines the mineral Bench. Early suffocations blow off with ease and in the denoument there are crunchy stones, forever and always something to like. Mima’s never really needed an abundance of sugar for balance and kudos to that. Drink 2017-2022.  Tasted March and May 2017

Wellington Court Chef Erik Peacock and Cait Bermuhler’s simcoe asparagus, ramp aioli, sous vide hen’s egg, puffed wild rice

Stratus Gamay 2014, VQA Niagara-on-the-Lake, Ontario (Winery, $29.20, WineAlign)

When asked about his approach to gamay winemaker J-L Groux responds with “continuously with changes.” This is what takes place in 2014 with the barrel time cut back by a full year, now only nine months, if nothing else for to place ultimate emphasis on fruit. Sounds simple but it’s anything but in a Groux universe. His gamay now gifts fresh strawberry and raspberry, a slight 13 per cent alcohol spine and the uplifting effect of zero-noticeable steaminess, steminess, aggression or grass. In contrast to many overly and overtly ambitious Ontario gamay here Stratus enters the antithetical to harsh realm and instead occupies the amenable-ethereal void. Less pressing means smoother transitions and weightless chimera. This captures varietal and place with its coax of maximum fruit. The plantings are from 1992 and 2001 (with an imperfect memory that includes the possibility of 1985 too). Drink 2017-2020.  Tasted twice, May 2017

Thanks for hosting Daniel. Cab-Merlot ’12 SFR @HenryofPelham is one for the ages @WineCouncilOnt @winecountryont

Henry Of Pelham Pinot Noir Speck Family Reserve 2012, VQA Short Hills Bench, Niagara Peninsula, Ontario (Winery, $34.95, WineAlign)

Always the elder, wise and delicate if elegant statesman for Ontario pinot noir. There is real demure and reserve, Speck family style and this dried red berry savour to both aromatics and flavour. Tart is an undercurrant and red currants run above. Right in its wheelhouse now, for a spell and then the slow fade will come. Drink 2017-2021.  Tasted May 2017

Henry Of Pelham Speck Family Reserve Baco Noir 2015, VQA Ontario (Winery, $24.95, WineAlign)

From vines planted in 1984, a more than significant fact of experience, wisdom and acumen from this baco noir. Couple that with what is arguably the finest varietal vintage in many years makes this the collector bottle for the baco fanatic. The rubbery reductiveness is so nicely offset by the flowers, the red fruit and the delicious appeal. Easily the finest ever, by anyone and especially this most prominent house. Great ripe acidity and fine, fine tannin. Drink 2017-2024. Tasted May and June 2017

Wellington Court Chef Erik Peacock and Cait Bermuhler’s confit lake huron pickerel, fingerling potatoes, chorizo vinaigrette, celery, capers

Rosewood Origin Cabernet Franc 2014, VQA Beamsville Bench, Ontario (Winery, $29.95, WineAlign)

It’s a deep, dark fruit, rich currant, pyrazine and savoury vintage for the Origin. It’s cabernet franc that brings strawberry, raspberry and ripe rhubarb to the table. It’s tart and layered, rich and even a touch hematic. Quite pure, red fruit driven and of finely tuned acidity. Never tries too hard, refuses to hide the naturally green character, does nothing to sheath or blanket and leaves the fruit to shine red, bright and vital. Drink 2017-2020.  Tasted May 2017

Stratus Cabernet Franc “Decant” 2014, VQA Niagara On The Lake, Ontario (Winery, $95.00, WineAlign)

“A designer’s hands are tied. They are only as good as their opportunities.” The words of the brilliant bottle designer Karim Rashid fully apply to the mirrored universe in which winemaker J-L Groux works, here with a deferential and ulterior cabernet franc, bottled with its lees. When I first tasted it in February (in advance of this auspicious release), its unfiltered state spoke of a hyperbole of perfume, marked by exoticism. The aromatics gave far east five-spice, star anise, cardamom, miso and incense, all natural by-products of its purposed ferment. More grain spoke out but also a roundness of tannin and a smoothness both coating and comforting. There was chocolate accentuated by the treatment, with thanks to those lees left in the bottle. The chopped up and constructed bottle catches the lees while the volume flows out and the function out of form mimics the thought of lees delivering structure and yet they are invisible, caught in a hidden net or nook, out of sight, out of mind. But it’s not about pouring. It’s about the hand, or the slight thereof. Then there is the copycat idealism of strata in the vineyard, of geology transferred to the bottle and kept there, like a ship perfectly preserved inside. This cabernet franc will age better, as is the plan, with thanks to the lees that you’ll never have to deal with. There were 110 cases made. Drink 2019-2029.  Tasted twice, February and May 2017

Wellington Court Chef Erik Peacock and Cait Bermuhler’s earl grey friand, poached rhubarb, vanilla mascarpone mousse

Henry Of Pelham Speck Family Reserve Cabernet Sauvignon/Merlot 2012, VQA Short Hills Bench, Niagara Peninsula, Ontario (616433, $39.95, WineAlign)

The warm 2012 is an ideal vintage for this very specific cabernets and merlot blend, a wine as deliberate and iconic to the Niagara effort as any that have come before or currently exist. The vintage falls into a line that remembers 1998 and 2002 (with a half wink for 2007 and three-quarters nod to 2010). The brightness of red fruit and the dusty grounding of that fruit into earth integrates quietly and when acidity joins, the balance is pitch perfect. The fineness of that acidity will allow the mild astringency and dark chocolate by barrel to melt with slow dripping ooze into proper and educated tannin. Is this Cabernet-Merlot Speck Family Reserve one for the ages? In a word yes and likely to rival that 1998 for a 15 year run through excellence. Drink 2017-2027.  Tasted May 2017

Run any machine on the harnessed marmalade energy of this @StratusWines Riesling Icewine #specialstuff #niagaraonthelake

Stratus Riesling Icewine 2015, VQA Niagara On The Lake (56671, $30.25, 200ml, WineAlign)

The Stratus Riesling Icewine 2015 simulates a true orange and apricot marmalade with a preserved lemon note and a bitter pitch edge. It actually goes into grapefruit a touch, develops unction as it fleshes in the mouth and never fattens or sweetens too much. A show off in triumvirate display of quality, beauty and rhythm. Drink 2019-2030.  Tasted May 2017

Good to go!

Godello

Twitter: @mgodello

Instagram: mgodello

WineAlign

The future is now for Lightfoot and Wolfville Vineyards

In the throes of judging 1,700 plus Canadian wines at the WineAlign National Wine Awards of Canada I slipped away to reconnect with Mike Lightfoot at his property in Wolfville, Nova Scotia. The last time I paid the family a visit, Mike, Jocelyn, Rachel and winemaker Josh Horton were planning, scheming and on the cusp of breaking new ground, figuratively and literally speaking. The new Lightfoot & Wolfville winery facility was beginning to take cerebral, engineered, augurate and anticipatory shape. It’s now well into the building phase, in fact, at some point this summer L & W’s unprecedented facility will open to the public. When it does it will change the wine landscapes that include more than just Wolfville, the Gaspereau, Annapolis Valleys and Nova Scotia. It will reset the needle, compass and artfully strategized standard for Canadian wineries everywhere.

Related – Consider the Gaspereau Valley

Mike and Jocelyn have taken a once thriving apple farm and turned its rolling hills into Nova Scotia’s most progressive organic and biodynamic winery while also perpetuating the raising of animals in the heritage meets modern agriculturist way. In 2014 I made the following ambitious statement. “Lightfoot & Wolfville will take everything anyone has ever thought about the Nova Scotia wine industry and turn it on its head. Hybrids and local varieties will continue to be a part of the stratagem. In the unpredictable climate of Nova Scotia’s wine growing regions that is a necessity but it’s what chardonnay and pinot noir will do that will put the province on the map and the world’s stage.” Mean it.

Cellar dining space at Lightfoot & Wolfville

Related – Great Chardonnay and Pinot Noir from Nova Scotia?

The external vineyard planted near Avonport called “Oak Island” is perched on a hill with a view of the Minas Basin at the head of the Gaspereau Valley. “Le Corton,” as it is known, or as I like to call it,  “Oak Isle Knoll” is where consulting oenologist Peter Gamble has placed 100 per cent certainty in the future success of Vinifera grapes. Vigorous vines will increase the possibilities for chardonnay, sparkling plus a host of expected and eclectic varieties, like riesling, sauvignon blanc, gewürztraminer, chenin blanc, chasselas and scheurebe.

Mike and winemaker Josh Horton ushered me through a tour of the new facility. A state of the art retail shop, quick production kitchen, al fresco pizza oven and a subterranean cellar, private dining facility and commercial kitchen to make iron chefs drool. The mammoth-sized, reemployed beams alone are pieces of reclaimed and refashioned wood to send one into a state of awe. It felt as though I were walking through the massive hull and underbelly of a great romantic period ship.

Al Fresco Pizza Oven

Mike Lightfoot has spent the past 15 years watching Nova Scotia’s wine industry transform from an unknown cottage entity to a destination that attracts thousands of visitors, heavily weighted to the summer months. He is drawing on experience but also careful to avoid repeating the mistakes some of his peers have made in trying to build and develop wine tourism at their nearby facilities. He is also grateful for what they have accomplished and how they have opened the door for the possibility of L & W’s imminent operation. Mike points out how in July and August the trail of cars moving along the Evangeline Trail is endless, cars that travel right past his property. Truly a case of “if you build it they will come.”

I sat down with Mike and Josh to taste 10 wines, some new and some revisits, for perspective and to expound on some personal theories of L & W relativity. Josh Horton is coming into his own as a winemaker and just in the nick of time. The nigh fact of this property’s history and ineluctable expansion will weigh on the ancienne ideology but Horton’s de facto ability and unaffected personality equip him with the tools to face the challenge head on. The future is now for Lightfoot and Wolfville Vineyards.

Sparkling wine you need to know @lwwines Blanc de Blanc Extra Brut 2013, from the shores of the #minasbasin #annapolisvalley #novascotia

Lightfoot & Wolfville Blanc De Blanc Extra Brut 2013, Nova Scotia, Canada ($45.00, WineAlign)

Josh Horton and Rachel Lightfoot presented an early, less leesy glimpse of their 100 per cent estate chardonnay at i4c in July of 2016. It was a different animal than this recently disgorged (late February/early March) sparkling wine. The Extra Brut lives up to its designation, from fruit grown on the shores of the Minas Basin under the auspices of a markedly warm year with exceptional phenolic ripeness and 25 per cent malolactic gain. The time relative to texture lees accumulation is approximately 40 months and it’s an accurate representation of Nova Scotia low and slow. The flavours are wisely developed ripe and spicy, leaning into a moment or two of oxygenation, but seemingly richer than the amount of lees time that was given. Now emerging from the shell of not just a warm but a great chardonnay year (as previously proven by the Ancienne released two years ago). The notion here is of a sparkling wine that has been brought home, a B de B that you need to get to know. There are layers and layers of character that fold and unfold. The precision, focus and rendering is citrus tamed, mouthfeel in perpetual expansion and contraction, length linear and elastic. And it’s just the beginning. Drink 2017-2023.  Tasted June 2017

Lightfoot & Wolfville Pinot Noir Ancienne 2014, Nova Scotia, Canada ($40.00, WineAlign)

Pinot Noir Ancienne is a product of a wild ferment and here in 2014 is possessive of a larger percentage of estate fruit, but still with a significant portion skimmed from (Al) McIntyre’s Blomidon vineyard. The typical Nova Scotia growing season means this was harvested during the last week of October and at approximately 20.5-21.5 brix, but of a lower crop level. Like the inaugural 2013 this still carries the elegant, highly cool climate provincial stamp, not skinny or lean by any means but certainly lithe and helped calmly and curatively along by 3rd and 4th fill neutral oak. The ’15 will be bottled in July, which will be 100 per cent estate fruit. Here is the second image of Nova Scotia pinot, built upon a well-designed foundation and an architectural struggle in search of structure. Ancienne is old-school, traditional, hand-made, artisanal. It is a wine that others will not yet know what to do with but the launching point is precise, progressive, poignant and teeming with wonder meets possibility. The fruit purity and transparency speaks to the honesty delivered. Drink 2017-2020.  Tasted June 2017

Lightfoot & Wolfville Pinot Noir Ancienne 2013, Nova Scotia, Canada ($40.00, WineAlign)

Retrospection, reflection and what we know now places this so obviously in the exact spot where it began. So now we establish a minimum five years going forward to reach the sweetest of sweet spots. This now gives perspective and a reference point for where ’14 is and will be going forward. This 2013 is less immediate, a wonder of first time luck, pomp and circumstance. It is nothing short of remarkable. Last tasted June 2017.

If de novo for Pinot Noir is to be found in Nova Scotia then count me in because the inaugural release from Lightfoot & Wolfville is the trailblazer for and from the extrinsic frontier. Tasting the painstakingly measured yet barely handled 2013 for the first time (from bottle) is like falling into a glass of Nova Scotia cherries. Somehow there is this simultaneous and virtual voyage abroad to imagine a comparison with Nuits-Saint-Georges, in its earth crusted, sanguine, welled up tension that begs questions and belies answers. A year yonder the taste from barrel and what can be said? Pinot Noir adjudicated, into a cortex of recognizable consciousness and thus into the natural Nova Scotia mystic. Ignore and forgive the dope of first returns, for no one could have imagined such ripeness and immediate gratification. Future releases will dial back in the name of structure. That said, in 2013 there is a red citrus, ferric debate that will send this to an exordium seven years down the road. Impossible inaugural release. Approximately 50 cases made. Drink 2015-2022.  Tasted July 2015

Experiments are for more than sharing #perspective #teachingmoment #progress @lwwines #unfiltered

Lightfoot & Wolfville Chardonnay Ancienne 2014, Nova Scotia, Canada ($40.00, WineAlign)

The name Ancienne and the proximate irony appraised is not lost for its translation as endemic or indigenous for wines made from Burgundian grape varieties raised on Nova Scotia soil. The sophomore chardonnay speaks in a vernacular a year to the wiser but at the expense of excitement, which is actually a good thing. A step back taken will result in two going forward, as I shall explain. The same regime exercised mimics the ’13, of 20 per cent new, 18 months in barrel, but a slight course altered with some reductive play in ’14, as an experiment but also as a plan. There seems to be more lees richness and spice notes that flit like direct darts on the palate. Different clones are harvested at different times, so now the vinifications are staggered and layered, which really shows on the stratified and almost germinating palate. Another year older allows these vines to bring diversified variegation, more Nova Scotia and as a consequence, less winemaking. The growth here is fascinating and enlightening. In the interim it may compromise the flavour profile and the wow factor but in the long run it is structure, longevity and impressibility that will give the green light to estate grown, Minas Basin success. Drink 2017-2021.  Tasted June 2017

Lightfoot & Wolfville Chardonnay Ancienne 2013, Nova Scotia, Canada ($40.00, WineAlign)

The ’13 seems to at first have really softened but that’s only relative to tasting it side by side with the 2014. It’s also leaner when considered side by each though still carries weight and creaminess on the palate. Winemaker Josh Horton also pours an unfiltered experimental bottle. It is so clean, almost indiscernible to the filtered ’13, except perhaps with more bite on the palate and yet less creaminess than the ’14.  Lasted Tasted June 2017.

Welcome to the new Chardonnay ethos, an east coast compages for la belle nouvelle écosse, the new borderland for Canadian vinifera. The respite found in Lightfoot & Wolfville’s first release is like breathing for the first time. As I noted a year ago while tasting through (mostly older) barrel trials, I have unearthed a Canadian winery animated in the architectural rendering of Premier Cru Chablis. Full textured, creamy aromatics, layers of lace and luxe, popping acidity and with length stretched to service now and later. Approximately 135 cases made. Drink 2015-2019.  Tasted July 2015

Lightfoot & Wolfville Chardonnay Ancienne Reserve 2013, Nova Scotia, Canada ($56.00, WineAlign)

The Chardonnay was planted in 2009 in a block that sits on the crest of the hill on the Wolfville vineyard site and the Ancienne Reserve is a barrel selection more than anything. It sees an additional six (to 24) months and because one of the barrels was new, it’s therefore 50 per cent new. Now tasting this for the second time a year later (the first time being at i4c 2016), the wood is melting and dissolving so all is coming together, but the unmistakeable L & W acidity meets Nova Scotia vines spice and bite is all over the palate. There is length here to last a decade. Never ending. Nothing if not a coup for new world/cold climate/NS chardonnay. You will not understand unless you taste it. Consulting oenologist Peter Gamble and his protégés Josh Horton and Rachel Lightfoot have allowed the fruit to speak without encumbrance. This chardonnay is neither stark nor beyond ripe and oak has been used with terrific restraint. I am not sure how Gamble could have known it would work but to a veteran of decades of Canadian harvests, it must be an absolute revelation. Drink 2017-2023.  Tasted June 2017

Lightfoot & Wolfville Tidal Bay 2016, Nova Scotia, Canada ($22.00, WineAlign)

The blend is l’acadie, geisenheim, chardonnay and riesling plus a smidgen of vidal. Just a great year, the l’acadie coming from rocky soil and the difference maker in the use of riesling. There is some residual sulphur, still activated citrus tablet and its aromas are propitiously fresh, from lean to piercing. The palate carries terrific texture and flesh, great citrus and a bit of unction. It even suggests fleshy citrus and stone fruit, with just that minor note of peach to make this so drinkable. The vinifera provides the structure while l’acadie is the back bone and this has plenty of it. The reams of citrus are simply striking. The better to best yet, a no doubter and without argument. For Tidal Bay it’s almost perfect. Drink 2017-2019.  Tasted twice, at L & W and blind at NWAC17, June 2017

Lightfoot & Wolfville Schuerebe 2016, Nova Scotia, Canada (WineAlign)

The schuerebe comes from up on the Oak Isle in Avonport, now just past the stage of baby vines, this the introduction as far as a style is concerned. That style combines elevated sugar and acidity. It’s highly floral and of incredible acidity, from vines that ripen later than riesling, though the plants are young of just a few years. Schuerebe is a wine that can beat its own sibling chardonnay in a wine competition, with some fat and flamboyance, alcohol near 9.5 per cent and those sugars (whose actual number is pointless) will track across some complex notions and age three to six years with ease. Drink 2017-2021.  Tasted June 2017

Lightfoot & Wolfville Pinot Noir Rosé 2016, Nova Scotia, Canada ($28.00, WineAlign)

The Rosé from pinot noir is 100 per cent estate varietal fruit destined for this purpose and not from a bleed, or as one. At $28 it doesn’t hit the same $20 Rosé crowd, here dry, saline, south of France ringing and as a ringer. The notes are distinctly lime and grapefruit, floral but not quite meunier floral. “When pinot noir can give you structure you keep making it this way,” notes winemaker Josh Horton. Good plan. Drink 2017-2019.  Tasted June 2017

Lightfoot & Wolfville Pinot Noir Rosé 2015, Nova Scotia, Canada ($28.00, WineAlign)

L & W’s will surely appear, perform and consummate as the lightest of all Rosés in any Canadian flight and as pinot noir it suffices to say all that needs in terms of rusty, rustic and taut. There is good salinity, perhaps one or two elevated blowsy notes of sulphur but all is forgiven in consideration of fine precision, presence and lightness of being. The minor leesy and lactic fromage melts into acidity and tasted blind it could be the closest of Moira cousins, à la Malivoire. Lemon and lime finish and very long. Drink 2017-2019.  Tasted June 2017

Good to go!

Godello

Twitter: @mgodello

Instagram: mgodello

WineAlign

Catch, taste and release Collection Bellenum by Nicolas Potel

To better days & retro négoce #burgundy with @RochedeBellene via @Nicholaspearce_ #nicholaspotel #bourgogne #meursault #santenay #monthelie #pommard #volnay #chambollemusigny #gevreychambertin #closdelaroche

Some tasting notes are easier than others to compose and others just need time. You can write some on the spot and you can sit on others until such time when their clarity is revealed. I’ve said it a hundred times. Great wines write their own reviews. We are merely the conduit to bring the notes to light.

Nicholas Pearce has a terrific relationship with Nicolas Potel. Agent and Burgundy producer, négoce, man of leisure. Diplomat and ambassador extraordinaire for the wines of Burgundy; Villages, Premier Cru and Grand Cru. Pearce held a tasting back in February for Potel’s Collection Bellenum. If there is anyone in Burgundy that Nicolas does not know I can’t say but in addition to running his own Domaine de Bellene and négoce Maison Roche de Bellene, Potel has drawn on his secret resources to deliver older parcels of Burgundy from producers who somehow hid these top vineyard gems from the world.

This tasting was simply ridiculous and I can’t help wonder how the universe aligns to bring such things to fruition. Some of the wines are priced beyond recognition while others are almost too good to be true. The LCBO is now purchasing four wines; Roche De Bellene Santenay 1er Cru Beaurepaire 1998, Roche de Bellene Monthelie Villages 2005, Roche De Bellene Chambolle-Musigny Villages 2001 and Roche De Bellene Gevrey-Chambertin Villages 2001. I tasted and reviewed 13 wines that day. Here are the notes.

Maison Roche De Bellene “Collection Bellenum” Santenay Premier Cru Beaurepaire 1998, Ac Burgundy (Agent, $64.95, WineAlign)

It’s always a gift to taste older Burgundy and righteously so from 1998. From the “Collection Bellenum” by Nicolas Potel and a nearly 20-year old bold and intact Santenay from what began as a surly vintage. Remnants of certainly once firm, gritty, rustic red fruit now cured like pinot noir gravlax meets bresaola. Carries through with a musty tone and still the acidity rages and circles the fruit wagon. Still some tannin (say, four years left) and a wisdom Santenay would not always have been able to foreshadow. Great gamey finish with Burgundian voice and vice grip tension. Drink 2017-2020.  Tasted February 2017

Maison Roche De Bellene “Collection Bellenum” Monthelie 2005, Ac Burgundy (Agent, $101.95, WineAlign)

Monthelie 2005 is the most acetic and volatile but that’s only by way of a side by side by each comparison to ’02 and 04. In many ways this shines the brightest and as the youngest it does so with the highest degree of freshness, though that is certainly not what was expected. One must realize that growing up is not yet done and this wine has simply not crossed the threshold into its older Burgundy self. It could be considered 2011 the way it speaks of red fruit and cool, elevated tones, as if no time has passed. Tannins are chalkier and offer up more limestone, red liquid ruby sensation. This Monthelie is the conundrum. Drink 2018-2027.  Tasted February 2017

Maison Roche De Bellene “Collection Bellenum” Monthelie 2004, Ac Burgundy (Agent, $101.95, WineAlign)

Monthelie 2004 is the brooding brother of the three Monthelie samples (along with ’02 and ’05), deep, rich, hematic, ferric and funky. Volatility is a major part of its character but the fruit still stands to tell an ’04 tale. Not the most ethereal of vintages as seen here but certainly full of energy and longevity. This lingers in a grippy way the others do not, so it has that going for it, which is nice. It will drink this way for five years more, at a very basic minimum. Drink 2017-2024.  Tasted February 2017

Maison Roche De Bellene “Collection Bellenum” Monthelie 2002, Ac Burgundy (Agent, $101.95, WineAlign)

Since this Monthelie is assessed in a ’02-’04-’05 mini flight, it can’t be helped but to discuss one in relation to the other two. It is noted that 2002 and 2005 share a heat-spiked affinity but it is this ’02 that carries it effortlessly and with more slow-hung and expertly seasoned cure than volatility. Burgundy as it is seen through Monthelie eyes is accomplished with utter purity, clarity and wisdom. This has ancient character in its DNA and 15 years of potential energy still coursing through its veins. So bright and at the same time indelibly dense and compressed. Beauty is in the eye of one who relishes but does not get hung up by dwelling in the past. Tremendous wine. Drink 2017-2025.  Tasted February 2017

Maison Roche De Bellene “Collection Bellenum” Volnay Premier Cru Clos Des Chenes 2005, Ac Burgundy (Agent, $190.95, WineAlign)

Clos des Chenes in the capable hands of Nicolas Potel ties a nice little ribbon around an oak old tree because it’s a very pretty Volnay, so floral as per the exercise and those subtle notes that make you think about fennel, graphite and the Burgundy bush equivalent of garrigue. This is extracted, rich and full of red berries (namely raspberry). It’s firm as much as the fruit requests it to be and the acidity is beautifully round. The grip in the tannin indicates many years ahead. Drink 2019-2029.  Tasted February 2017

Maison Roche De Bellene “Collection Bellenum” Volnay 1er Cru Clos Des Chenes 2002, Ac Burgundy (Agent, $183.95, WineAlign)

From 2002 it is Potel’s Clos des Chenes that acts the age apparent one but the threshold is far from breached or really at this 15 year stage, even reached. Nor is the fruit to tannin inversion in danger of a transgression. The floral Volnay component is reduced, layered and dipped into cherry-ripened liqueur. The tannin in this vintage runs across that impressing line from sweet to aggressive. I would have my pleasure with this Volnay over the next two or three juicy and grippy years. Drink 2017-2020.  Tasted February 2017

Maison Roche De Bellene “Collection Bellenum” Pommard Premier Cru Les Pézerolles 2005, Ac Burgundy (Agent, $209.95, WineAlign)

The vineyard Les Pézerolles is widely considered the finest in Pommard and the vintage 2005 one of the decade’s best (along with 2002 and 2009). Potel’s work here is with a pinot noir still youthful but not as young as the Monthelie. This Pommard is firm and separates itself as it needs to be, with subtle hints of sanguine and bitters. This could also be assessed as quinine and savour but also of a richness that reveals some kind of chocolate menthol aroma. Not a gritty but certainly a rigid Pommard. It’s quite chewy and promising for long life to come from such a promiscuous and preferable mouthful to enjoy. Will open for full business by the end of the calendar year. Drink 2017-2024.  Tasted February 2017

Maison Roche De Bellene “Collection Bellenum” Gevrey Chambertin Villages 1999, Ac Burgundy (Agent, $96.95, WineAlign)

The vintage has been my go to, fan favourite and highest probability for cellar pulling success since purchasing some Girardin Premier Cru more than 15 years ago and exacting success each time one is opened. Nicolas Potel is both lucky and highly intelligent in his negotiating some 1999 from Gevrey-Chambertin. This here now is quite funky in its own right and that perfect example of older Burgundy walking the fine line of earth-fruit-volatility exactitude. This is a beautifully rich and red liqueur red though I can see how some would see it as showing some microbes to change the conversation. No matter though because tannin following structure is securely intact. Drink 2017-2022.  Tasted February 2017

Maison Roche De Bellene “Collection Bellenum” Gevrey Chambertin Premier Cru Petit Chapelle 2001, Ac Burgundy (Agent, $113.00, WineAlign)

Potel finds gold in Gevrey-Chambertin with this extraordinary Petit Chapelle Premier Cru barrel. There is a level of ripeness and extraction that exceeds most of the rest in this magnificent négoce line-up and an aromatic sweetness sans apareil. Really fine and grainy tannins, more sweetness feigned and ropey fruit reigned in and fully completely surrounded. The tough partners have yet to relent. That and the whole distinction is nothing short of amazing. Drink 2017-2025.  Tasted February 2017

Maison Roche De Bellene “Collection Bellenum” Grand Cru Clos De La Roche 2004, Ac, Ac Burgundy (Agent, $307.95, WineAlign)

The 2004 Monthelie actually helped in preparation to taste this ’04 Clos de la Roche and that speaks volumes about the vintage as a whole. Homogenous would be one way to say it but clarity and transparency is a good thing. The earthy twang, terroir-funk and rich liquor will collectively never be confused with 2001 and certainly not 1998. This has some serious rigid, kick-ass, dark fruit ripped by acidity and wrangled by mean and aggressive tannin. If you are a fan of powerful Grand Cru than this is yours. You’ll have to be patient though. What lady bug year? Drink 2019-2026.  Tasted February 2017

Maison Roche De Bellene “Collection Bellenum” Grand Cru Clos De La Roche 2001, Ac, Ac Burgundy (Agent, $307.95, WineAlign)

A greater than the sum of its original parts vintage now in clear retrospection is the Clos de La Roche 2001, now having travelled to another realm, an ulterior Bungundian dimension, It is from out of the walled in Grand Cru La Roche that the purity cries, laughs and then cries again. Charity from Burgundy in utmost clarity and a minor important edge of merde. It’s simply pure, terroir-infiltrating gout de Roche squeezed from the earth and emancipated into the greater wine as a whole. The effort to acknowledge the ethereal is no effort at all. The ease of breath is touching and thankful. So pretty, firm, but really, just easy living. Like perfect parents who have raised a confident child with perfect social skills. It’s a medieval poem. You can actually drink this now. Drink 2017-2032.  Tasted February 2017

Maison Roche De Bellene “Collection Bellenum” Grand Cru Clos De La Roche 1998, Ac, Ac Burgundy (Agent, $364.95, WineAlign)

Clos de La Roche 1998 may be 19 years old but you have to swirl the britches out of this Grand Cru because reduction persists in its make-up. Once you work your way over the wall a field of wildflowers and a roses bouquet lays out as far as the nose can mind’s eye. This is pure candy in its most arid, blessed and gout de terroir way. It is as charming as Burgundy can be and yet so fine of tannin, tight and duplicitously-grained in clone upon itself. One of those wines so difficult to put to words because it teaches and you can do nothing but listen. I’d still want to wait two more years, maybe more, before knowing I’ve waited long enough. Close de la Roche speaks to me but to answer with any real credibility and respect I will need to think some more. Drink 2019-2035.  Tasted February 2017

Maison Roche De Bellene “Collection Bellenum” Meursault Premier Cru Charmes 2002, Ac Burgundy (Agent, $214.95, WineAlign)

From Nicolas Potel in Meursault and a highly prized, charged and anticipated Charmes Premier Cru from 2002 no less, immediately distinctive for the smoky, flinty, direct and taut inflection. It would be hard not to appreciate how the barrel has integrated to the point of absence and in effect, walked out the door. Still the fruit persists and it is the years of melting lees that act as the buoy for that fruit to shine like the gem it obviously was, and is. Citrus yes but not definable as such and acidity also melted and dripping with paraffin in advance of honey. That alternative sweetness is still a few years away. The slow evolution and more to come is one of those great impossibilites to make you smile. Drink 2017-2025.  Tasted February 2017

Good to go!

Godello

Twitter: @mgodello

Instagram: mgodello

WineAlign

Get back to Greece

Black Corinthian Raisin in early stages of veraison #manyshadesofachaia #prettyinpeloponnese

Over the past few weeks I have been getting reacquainted with some close friends. The wines of Greece. Greek wine and Godello have spent some quality time together, both at home and abroad. While in Paris last November I paid a visit to Gare au Gorille, a bistro in the Batignolles district of the 17th Arrondissement in Paris. A small but quintessential tasting was taking place; Thymiopoulos, Hatzidakis, Tetramythos and Sklavos. The tasting was a traveling extension from Oenos, a collaboration between winemakers Apostolos Thymiopoulos, Haridimos Hatzidakis, Evriviadis Sklavos and the wine trader Georgios Ioanndis.

#volcanic in Paris with #hatzidakis @DrinkGreekWine @3050imports Try it November 22nd in Toronto with @johnszaboms #aidani #assyrtiko #haridimoshatzidakis #mylos #santorini

Related – Getting into Greece

Gare au Gorille is a fine French paradoxical pun (“be careful of the gorilla) and also the title of a 1952 song by French musician Georges Brassens.  At the Paris tasting I rubbed shoulders with Greek gods, got salty with volcanic Santorini and travelled vicariously to Lixouri through endemic varietals and whimsical blends.

I highly recommend re-habituating with the new wines of Greece (which are actually the old ones) on a regular basis. The practice will take you from assyrtiko to retsina, debina to moschofilero and agiorgitiko to xinomavro. It will also transport you to places; Amyndeon to Zitsa, Nemea to Thessaloniki, Naoussa to Santorini. I’ve said it before. Greek wine is paradoxically diverse, mythically complex and critical to experiential wine blessedness.

The Greek paradox of producing great wines without anyone really knowing anything about them brings me to Zeno’s paradox of place. It was Eudemus and Alexander of Aphrodisias who bore witness and affirmation for the reconstruction of Zeno’s philosophical premise. The infinite regression goes like this: “Everything is somewhere: so places are in a place, which is in turn in a place, etc. The limitless exercise never allows you to get grounded so you end up nowhere. It was Aristotle who provided the solution. You always have to be somewhere. After all, being deprived of the possibility of saying where something is just leads to emptiness.

Red, white, rock and @DrinkGreekWine roll. Getting into old #winesofgreece with new regard.

Related – Till I reach Achaia ground

Greek wines offer a sense of being somewhere, all of them, but the challenge facing the Greek wine industry is securely fastened “in a place somewhere between the relic glow of early period brilliance and the cusp of legacy defining, career opus penning compositions. Making wine from endemic or indigenous grapes is a calling to a higher love, in spite of harsh conditions, geographical difficulties and the relative channels of global obscurity.”

The Greek dichotomy paradox leads me to the joke. A mathematician, a physicist and an engineer are asked to give an answer to the following question. One Greek vineyard is planted to endemic varietals and another to international ones. The grapes from one are brought to blend with those of the other. At which point will the ferments from the two vineyards strike a balance? The mathematician said they would never actually meet because the series is infinite. The physicist said they would meet when time equals infinity. The engineer said that within one more harvest they would be close enough for all practical purposes. The same might be said for Greek wines brought to a Toronto tasting and the locals coming to taste them.

Related – A new Greek morning

We tasted those wines at the WineAlign office, at the Royal Ontario Museum and at The LCBO’s Summerhill location with Christopher Sealy and Victory Wines and Spirits. Recurring themes and new finds were acquiesced. The wine-producing regions of Santorini (Aegean), Thessaloniki/Naoussa (Macedonia) and Nemea (Peloponnese) continue their inroads on the global scene. I noted that Achaia and Patras in the northern Peloponnese are on the verge of breaking out. The same is and will soon be said for Halkidiki, Mantinia, Zitsa, Evia, Kitherona, Imathia, Leprini, Attica, Crete, and Arkadia.

@DrinkGreekWine NOW! With @johnszabo in the RBC Glass Room #winesofgreece #EDOAO

We know by instinct that wines cast the shadow of their own destruction before them and are designed from the first with an eye to their later existence as ruins. Could this be more appropriate than when discussing the ancient and the new brought together in the wines of Greece? Unlike anywhere else Greek wines just seem to carry in their DNA a rusticity, a wisdom and a sense of age just as they are born, but they also last, linger and age longer than most anyone expects. They are to a generalization, the most especial set of regional wines in the world. To read his report that asks to drop the aristocratic pretence, please travel over to WineAlign.

Related – Wines of the People, Wines of the Place, by John Szabo, MS.

These following 53 tasting notes are all from May, a month that may as well have been dedicated to the wines of Greece. With thanks as always to Sofia Perpera, Twitter: @DrinkGreekWine, Instagram: winesofgreece and Facebook: @newwinesofgreece. I’ve four words for you babes. Get back to Greece.

2017 #winesofgreece @ROMToronto tasting highlights @DrinkGreekWine

Sparkling

Zoinos Zitsa Semi Sparkling 2016, PDO Zitsa (WineAlign)

Sparkling debina or halfway thereof is not exactly household in name for Ontario but the mountainous, high elevation locale of Epirus is a place for which, where and why sparkling wine makes sense. Grapes of high acidity come from out of a cool, windy, snow, sleet and rain kind of place. From a cooperative with maximum 11 per cent alcohol and a short time on lees, this is loaded with terpenes and dried (very gardenia) flowers The medicinal tonic is complimented by a pinch of sugar (that makes it go down) and go down with elegant ease. The lime finish is something to which you are welcome to attach a “like” emoji. Greek discovery number one. Approximately $20. Drink 2017-2018.  Tasted May 2017  @zoinoswinery  #ZoinosWinery  @zoinoswinerysa

Kir Yianni Akakies Xinomavro Sparkling Rosé 2015, Ac Macedonia, Greece (482646, $18.95, WineAlign)

The most interesting triad of xinomavro, Amyndeon and sparkling comes through in this toasty, flinty and rusty sweet Akakies. Rosé of strawberry, raspberry, currants and mountain tea. Chill it really well and pour it at a summer reception in the sun. With Dolmades! Drink 2017-2019.  Tasted April 2017  @kiryianni  @KolonakiGroup  kiryianni  @KirYianni  @KolonakiGroup

Rosé

Lykos Winery Rosé Grenache Rouge 2016, Pgi Evia, Greece (AgentWineAlign)

The Lykos Rosé is a grenache rouge play with some merlot and is dealt the wisdom afforded by 40 year-old vines on the south part of the island. Clay soil sits overtop limestone and the aromatics borrow this straight away, at first saline and then into Rosé richness. Texture comes with a sweet and sour palate. These vines gift low yields at four tonnes per hectare and its wine follows a similar to malagousia citrus line. Quite distinct. Drink 2017-2018.  Tasted March 2017  @LYKOSWINERY  lykounanalykoswineryevia  @LykosWinery

Troupis TOMH Rosé 2016, IGP Arcadia, Peloponnese, Greece (Agent, $18.95, WineAlign)

I tasted this magical, single-vineyard moschofilero blush on two consecutive days and each time it gave me epiphany shivers. There are few Ontario market specimens of Rosé made from a white wine grape with only minor skin contact, let’s say six to 10 hours and 24 hours maceration, which is remarkable since it is usually red wine that turns water into Rosé. But moschofilero carries pigmentation and is light-skinned so it’s best of both worlds suitable, like a perfect cross between pinot gris and for the sake of argument, pinot noir. First thought says it’s akin to a vin gris style and better off for it, celebrating a mountain terroir and allowing natural acidity to dictate the ideal. This TOMH (which may as well be an acronym for Troupis owed Moschofilero hero) helps to coax out the mineral and smells like the salinity and stone in a cave. I don’t find it overly fruity in terms of aromatics, even stoic and of high level acidity. There is faint cranberry, pomegranate and currant notes mixed with mountain tea and again, such salinity. Some residual sugar comes apparent on the palate but it’s essentially dry. Damn if moschcofilero isn’t ideally suited to Rosé and this TOMH will age a bit. Drink 2017-2019.   Tasted May 2017  @TroupisWinery    @VictoryWine  troupiswinery  victorywineandspiritsinc  @troupis.winery  Victory Wine & Spirits Inc.  

Thymiopoulos Rosé de Xinomavro 2014, PGI Macedonia, Greece (Agent, $22.95, WineAlign)

Thymipoloupos fashions a wholly different sort of Rosé, using the thicker skinned and more direct xinomavro as the man, so a masculine blush this is, full of tang and at first, a medium-dry meets cordial intensity. So much strawberry comes across the tongue but with dusty savour and then the salinity kicks in to bite the sweetness. This is very long and not so many make Rosé like this. Even just a touch in the oxidative way. At the present time varietal, climate, geography and vintage directs the style but adjustments will be made along the way. The formula will refine and in turn reveal some singular Greek Rosé. Drink 2017-2018.  Tasted May 2017  @thymiopoulosvin  @VictoryWine  @winesofnaoussa  apostolosthymiopoulos  eletsi  victorywineandspiritsinc  Eleftheria Tsitsipa  Victory Wine & Spirits Inc.  @WinesofNaoussa

Whites

Assyrtiko

Lykos Winery Assyrtiko 2016, Pgi Kitherona, Greece (AgentWineAlign)

Assyrtiko thrives beyond Santorini, here in the diaspora locale of Kitherona, at 450m on the slopes near Thebes. The terroir is stony shale with good drainage and the usual mineral strike is fattened up a touch but also quite reductive and far from shedding the barrel. The 15 years old vines are now just coming into play and owning the grapes. After nine months it went into medium toast French (300L) oak barrels for four months, to broaden horizons in a whole new way of looking at assyrtiko. Such smoulder and leesy texture reminds of Melgaço’s Anselmo Mendes and his barrel-aged alvarinho. Plenty of lemon juices over the finish. Drink 2018-2021.  Tasted March 2017  @LYKOSWINERY  lykounanalykoswineryevia  @LykosWinery

Lyrarakis Vóila Assyrtiko 2016, Crete, Greece (Agent, $18.95, WineAlign)

Certainly Cretan but no cretan this assryrtiko from relatively high altitude (580m) at the eastern part of Crete is a light and slightly resinous white with plenty of herbs and nice varietal spice. The citrus dominates the palate but the finish retains to mountain tea and fish complimenting leaves. Nicely done, clean, modern and a good take on the grape. Drink 2017-2018.  Tasted May 2017  @lyrarakis  @MajesticWineInc  @winesofcrete  lyrarakiswines  majesticwinesinc  winesofcrete  @LyrarakisWines  @majesticwinecellars

Santo Wines Assrytiko Organic 2016, PDO Santorini, Greece (Agent, $20.00, WineAlign)

Assyrtiko as only it can be, from a place reborn of a massive volcanic thrush in phases, covering the island in a 60-70m layer of stony, rocky pumice. One of the fuller and more concentrated assyrtiko with fruit juicing in and out of the bleeding lava stone. Still a water starved expression as it has to be from its harsh growing climate, a thick-skinned, drought resistant and managed, naturally selected grape. All this portends to make this expression all that much more incredible, of salty, palpable extract, linear and yet magically delicious. Drink 2018-2021. Tasted May 2017  @santo_wines  @Santoriniwines  @KolonakiGroup  santo_wines  winesfromsantorini  kolonakigroup  @SantoWines  @WinefromSantorini

Domaine Sigalas Assyrtiko 2016, PDO Santorini, Greece (Agent, $22.95, WineAlign)

At Sigalas the eponymous estate σοδειά (annata, vintage, etc.) is assyrtiko, solo assyrtiko, in stainless steel, four months on lees and from 2016, a rich vintage. It’s actually a big vintage, a huge vintage for quantity and quality replete with a fineness from those lees which really compound the mineral butter of this assyrtiko. Like 2011 and more. While the specialized village-specific assyrtiko from Sigalas are each their own sort of exceptional snowflakes, it is this broad yet precise swath of volcanic Santorini that defines the producer and the place. There is no excuse for not drinking a bottle of this wine at least three times a year. Drink 2017-2022.  Tasted March 2017  @DomaineSigalas  @MajesticWineInc  domainesigalas  @DomaineSigalas  Panayiota Kalogeropoulou

Argyros Assyrtiko Estate 2015, PDO Santorini, Greece (Agent, $23.95, WineAlign)

It must first be noted that the fruit in this Argyros bottle comes from 150-plus year-old ungrafted vines in Episkopi on (and it can’t be overstated) volcanic and sandy soil. It’s 100 per cent assyrtiko raised in 80 per cent stainless steel and 20 French oak for six months. The tenacity of assyrtiko vines built up from lava soil and the steadfast grip mixed with some barrel cream puts this in a singular category for white wine. It never forgets from whence and where it came but it takes grippy, piercing and citrus-stone character to another next level. Not to knock previous vintages but in here there is great structure and the stainless to wood compendium puts it in an ionic to corinthian entablature. Low yields, assyrtiko, a volcano, architecture and impeccable balance bring this all together. Drink 2018-2025.  Tasted May 2017    @Santoriniwines  @KolonakiGroup  #argyrosestate  winesfromsantorini  kolonakigroup  @ArgyrosEstate  @WinefromSantorini  @KolonakiGroup

Gaia Wines Thalassitis Santorini 2016, PDO Santorini, Greece (315010, $32.95, WineAlign)

Thalassitis is Gaia’s original wine, first produced in 1994 and the onomatopoeia in the nomenclature is in ode to Homer. The poet referred to Gaia’s Nemea (in the Peloponnese) as Ampeloessa, meaning “full of vines.” The searing and intense endemic to Santorini assyrtiko also carries some impressive weight (on a 13 per cent alcohol frame) with repeated shots of lime and formidable black pumice grit. See ’tis the sound of thalassitis and assyrtiko which mimics its searing and volcanic calescent character. The words sound like the sea to repeat the rhetorical effect. Definitive assyrtiko so easy to swallow. Drink 2017-2022.  Tasted May 2017  @GaiaWines  @Smallwinemakers  @Santoriniwines  gaiawines  #smallwinemakerscollection  winesfromsantorini   @GaiaWinesGR  @smallwinemakerscollection  @WinefromSantorini

Domaine Sigalas Kavalieros 2015, PDO Santorini, Greece (Agent, SAQ 11814421, $31.00, WineAlign)

I’ve not yet tasted the Kavalieros 2014, so this single-vineyard, 18 months on lees done in stainless steel Kavalieros 2015 made by “Mr. George” is the benchmark for Santorini, assrytiko and salty white wines everywhere. The first release was 2009. Straight up and turning the world on its head, like the old man on the label and upside down against Apollo’s Aegean Cyclades. This ’15 richer still, more than the seven villages wines and a hyperbole as compared to the entry-level assyrtiko, of deeper mineral, compressed, layered and fantastic. Crushed rocks permeate in aggregate, it’s quixotically saline and textured, of intense presence and finally, structured. For 15 years at least. A late shot of natural Santorini tonic swirls in centrifuge with assyrtiko so wound up. This will need 10 years to unwind and allow for cracks to form in the mineral shell, followed by the birth of its fruit. It should never be forgotten that assyrtiko can and will show fruit but with Kavalieros you’ll have to be patient. Drink 2020-2031.  Tasted March 2017  @DomaineSigalas  @MajesticWineInc  domainesigalas  @DomaineSigalas  Panayiota Kalogeropoulou

Santo Wines Grande Reserve 2014, PDO Santorini, Greece (Agent, $40.95, WineAlign)

Santo’s Grand Reserve is a special assyrtiko in its own class. It shares an affinity with other volcanic whites of Santorini in that it comes from selected vines, many 100 years of age or more and it is that mineral-gifting, salty giving soil that speaks of place. But in the case of Santo’s GR we are talking about assyrtiko that spent 12 months in French barrels so the texture and flavour compounds are directed into crème frâiche, island garrigue and tea. The classic Santorini rock and stone is never abandoned or oppressed but the lactic-milky notes are quite present. The citrus too seems less electric, more compressed and the level of tang, whether from lava or by wood spice, is very prevalent. This reminds me of what happens when a winemaker like Anselmo Mendes adds a year of barrel aging to Alvarinho, though in this case the volcano always offers the balance to keep things honest and real. This will age for a long time. Drink 2018-2028.  Tasted May 2017  @santo_wines  @Santoriniwines  @KolonakiGroup  santo_wines  winesfromsantorini  kolonakigroup  @SantoWines  @WinefromSantorini

Domaine Sigalas Assyrtiko Single Village Collection Pyrgos 2016, PDO Santorini, Greece (AgentWineAlign)

This particular locale from the “7” collection is from Pyrgos Village, an assyrtiko on the lees for one year in stainless. The collection are drawn from the villages (all seven of them represented), 1000 bottles per village and only sold by the case. The first vintage of this seven strong is a direct into the micro-place investigation, into what separates one from the next, with a range of altitudes and harvest dates and brace yourself for the news. August 20th is the last one! This Pyrgos is rich and intensely mineral, of wow factor intensity, deeply round and rolling, swelling in waves of Aegean acidity. Fine-spun citrus, of lemon without description, like the sea, its creatures and their freshness, with a zest and a pierce of that lemon. Drink 2017-2024.  Tasted March 2017  @DomaineSigalas  @MajesticWineInc  domainesigalas  @DomaineSigalas  Panayiota Kalogeropoulou

Fascinations with @troupiswinery & @thymiopoulosvin and some Greek geology @DrinkGreekWine

Malagousia

Domaine Porto Carras Malagousia 2016, PGI Halkidiki, Greece (WineAlign)

From Greece’s largest organic vineyard on the western coasts of Sithonia their malagousia is emblematic of a varietal story, of a lost grape, revived in the 70s and 80s. It is here that easier ripening happens and the wines can reach 13.5-14.0 per cent alcohol but with a rich forest acting as a barrier to the sea, trapping cool air and protecting the vineyards from summer heat. Highly aromatic, anti-oxidative and dynamic, like peach potage in syrup, of orchard fruit, an oily palate and a portage of melted alloy sensation. It is both mineral and fat at the same time. Even a bit chewy. Needs a big chill. Drink 2017-2019. Tasted May 2017  @PortoCarrasWine  Domaine Porto Carras  @DomainePortoCarras

Lykos Winery Malagousia 2016, Pgi Evia, Greece (WineAlign)

Lykos Winery was started in 1989, twenty years after Apostolos Lykos’ grandfather had already been using athiri and savatiano for his restaurant, which at the time had 17 seats but has since grown to 1000. Here malagousia explodes with aromatica, it’s rich and viscous with thanks to the island’s southern portion at Halkida. From a climate affected by two seas, so it’s both herbal and fuelled by lemon preserve, so Greek yes but so specific to this place. The acidity has terrific temper, tang and the wet, soft metal is felt. Vineyards at 200m are a mere 12 years-old. Just wait. Drink 2017-2019. Tasted March 2017  @LYKOSWINERY   lykounanalykoswineryevia  @LykosWinery

Y’all should think about pouring this @DrinkGreekWine #malagousia #bytheglass #megaspileo #cavino #achaia #peloponnese #Prowein #prowein2017

Domain Mega Spileo Malagousia 2016, PGI Achaia, Peloponnese, Greece (Agent, WineAlign)

The domain with the awe-inspiring, breathtaking vineyards set in a bowl below the medieval monastery has fashioned a malagousia worthy of Achaia and no restaurant list should discount how much pleasure it can bring. White wine rarely gives away so freely of salty, sweet and tart fruit juice, as if this Mega Spileo was juiced straight from the peach, plum, lemon and lime trees. There are no frivolous bells and whistles here, only natural free run juice within the context of how the varietal is expressed in Achaia. Northern Peloponnese cool altitude character right here. Drink 2017-2019.  Tasted March 2017    @apostolosGW  #MegaSpileo  Apostolos Gerakinis

Domaine Tetramythos Malagousia 2016, PGI Achaia, Peloponnese, Greece (SAQ 12910335, $17.95, WineAlign)

Malagousia from Achaia brings the goods and again magnified by the vintage a level of this specific juicy richness. This was fermented in higher temperatures to avoid 2015’s problematic alcoholic fermentation. As a result the impressed and increased humidity translates to the faux-botrytis, peachy sauvignon blanc thing and then the acidity and citrus just take over,. The palate is pure classic malagousia, possessive of great low pH and high natural acidity. This 2016 is crispy but more aromatic than usual. Drink 2017-2021.  Tasted March 2017  @Tetramythos  #tetramythoswines  @tetramythoswines  Devon Masciangelo

Taverna Toxotis, Düsseldorf

Moschofilero

Semeli Feast Moschofilero 2014, Peloponnese, Greece (477562, $12.95, WineAlign)

The hang time and extraction seem for one, delayed and two, pressed for success. There is a decidedly ripe yet slightly oxidative note on this moschofilero from the Peloponnese, a hint of banana and another one that m makes one think of guava. The palate brings a coiffed citrus and plenty of sour tang. Served warm this will not thrill but with obvert chill and grilled fish it will do just fine. Drink 2017.  Tasted May 2017  @SemeliWines     #semeliwines  #artisanalwineimports  @SemeliWines  @artisanalwineimports

Boutari Moschofilero 2016, Mantinia, Greece (172387, $13.25, WineAlign)

If heights have anything to do with adding some favour and complexity into the success of moschofilero than the 650m of clay soils for Boutari’s bottling launch from a good place. Altitude does in fact bring some extra added texture and it is the palate that wins big. Classic yellow stone fruit, citrus and glade are part of the aromatic profile. The mouthfeel is nicely delicate and then you get the wooly, fuzzy and mouth coating feel. Finishes quick but for the price, as expected. Drink 2017-2018.  Tasted May 2017  @boutari  @KolonakiGroup  boutariwines  kolonakigroup  @boutariwines  @KolonakiGroup

Tasting day @winealign

Skouras Moschofilero 2016, PGI Peloponnese, Greece (442178, $15.25, WineAlign)

The Skouras Moschofilero is grown at 700-750m up on the cool locale of the Mantinia Plateau. The depth in colour of the skins can turn out a hue not unlike pinot gris or gewürztraminer and the skins’ texture makes contact so very doable. A hint of though well short of the idea is the approach here, highly aromatic but also lactic. Rosewater and rose petal on the terpenic nose are joined by seminal acidity. The palate adds lemon, lime and grapefruit though stays south of the bitter pith agency. Quite clean, reductive even, of a stainless stylistic and cool. Finishes with lemon polish, certainly a lighter version of dry gewürztraminer but also connected to riesling and the aforementioned pinot gris. A chameleon and very versatile. Drink 2017-2018.  Tasted May 2017 @DOMAINESKOURAS  @KolonakiGroup  skourasdomaine  @KolonakiGroup  @domaineskouras

Troupis Fteri Moschofilero 2016, IGP Arcadia, Peloponnese, Greece (392936, $16.95, WineAlign)

Fteri from Yiannis Troupis is more than just a matter of the rich extract bringing the classic faux sugary aromatics, of sugar pears and moschcofilero’s wild scent. It’s also a spring feeling, of unfurling fiddleheads and their herbal-vegetal, early spring freshness before turning into a pungent fern (Fteri). Such a refreshing white with a two month quick dance in the barrel. Terrific quality from altitude that pushes some salivating acidity thanks to the elevation and all in all over delivers quality at the next step up from entry level. Drink 2017-2019.  Tasted May 2017  @TroupisWinery  @VictoryWine  troupiswinery  victorywineandspiritsinc  @troupis.winery  Victory Wine & Spirits Inc.  

Troupis Moschofilero 2016, PDO Mantinia, Greece (463422, $18.95, WineAlign)

Fteri from Yiannis Troupis is more than just a matter of the rich extract bringing the classic faux sugary aromatics, of sugar pears and moschcofilero’s wild scent. It’s also a spring feeling, of unfurling fiddleheads and their herbal-vegetal, early spring freshness before turning into a pungent fern (Fteri). Such a refreshing white with a two month quick dance in the barrel. Terrific quality from altitude that pushes some salivating acidity thanks to the elevation and all in all over delivers quality at the next step up from entry level. Drink 2017-2019.  Tasted May 2017  @TroupisWinery  @VictoryWine  troupiswinery  victorywineandspiritsinc  @troupis.winery  Victory Wine & Spirits Inc.  

Muscat

Domaine Tetramythos Muscat Sec Blanc Nature 2016, PGI Peloponnese, Greece (AgentWineAlign)

If you want to learn anything about breaking through boundaries, magical realism and the pragmatic confidence of a winemaker like Panayiotis Papagiannopoulos than this is the wine for you. Muscat de (extreme) petit grains’ higher level of protein gives it the ability to stabilize earlier, yet don’t think this is a wine without risk or complexity, which is why so many others should use it and make it this way. Great natural acidity again, as always with this producer, pure essence of lemon and what lemon will bring. Like 2014 that acidity and the dry extract are in this vacuum, so this just sucks the moisture from the mouth. Please be patient and wait for the great tart lemon of this Muscat dpg which means “something great” to speak to you. Oh would I like to see this grape and this style done in Ontario. Dry extract and tannin at its white wine finest. Drink 2017-2021.  Tasted March 2017  @Tetramythos  #tetramythoswines  @tetramythoswines  Devon Masciangelo

The inimitable @tetramythos @DrinkGreekWine of Panayiotis Papagiannopoulos @Prowein #naturalacidity #roditis #retsina #muscat #blancnature #malagousia #Prowein #prowein2017

Roditis

Domaine Tetramythos Roditis 2016, PDO Patras, Greece (Agent, $14.95, WineAlign)

The roditis 2016 is a product of a sluggish fermentation, of almost 100 days, plus malolactic that began half way through. As a result it mixes lemon blossom with mineral and goes more unctuous than some other vintages. The complexity and structure are high on the Tetramythos scale. This is the organic bottling, as opposed to the PGI Peloponnese natural. Drink 2017-2020.  Tasted March 2017  @Tetramythos  #tetramythoswines  @tetramythoswines  Devon Masciangelo

Domaine Tetramythos Roditis 2015, PGI Peloponnese, Greece (Agent, $17.95, WineAlign)

Roditis 2015 is the natural one, racked from the top and finally now settled (so at this time of tasting 2016 is not yet in bottle but at this time of writing should already be as it always does in April). This is the cleanest and purest of the natural wines on the planet, low in pH, high of natural acidity and without a care in the world. With nothing to fear in regards to spoilage it can go on its own personal shopping spree, accumulate character, personality and confidence with the end result being that there is more of everything in the natural one. It’s terrifically repeatable, replicable and clonal acidity makes it quite trippy, stepping on and igniting the light fantastic’s wire. You just have to take a stab in the dark with winemaker Panayiotis Papagiannopoulos’ roditis. Or ye have not yet lived. Drink 2017-2021.  Tasted March 2017  @Tetramythos  #tetramythoswines  @tetramythoswines  Devon Masciangelo

Domaine Tetramythos Retsina 2016, PGI Achaia, Peloponnese, Greece (AgentWineAlign)

The Tetramythos Retsina is made from roditis but can’t be labeled as such, why, because of perfectionist interests and bureaucracy. This is most certainly not the roditis you know, or think you know. This emerges unscathed and in a happy place from out of a natural fermentation and then amphora raised. The cognitive absence of resin and evergreen over-attention is replaced by a conifer funk and a thyme-rosemary herbal meld, but it’s all so faint and subtle. Lots of lemon and even some orange notes are part of the aromatic mix. The texture transfer is seamless and all is calm, a reflection of the maker and the gracious proprietors. Drink 2017-2021.  Tasted March 2017  @Tetramythos  #tetramythoswines  @tetramythoswines  Devon Masciangelo

Savatiano

Papagiannakos Savatiano Vieilles Vignes 2016, Attica, Greece (Agent, $17.65, WineAlign)

From Attica the old vines do elevate savatiano to a fine level, above and beyond the pale and the ecru. Bottled exactly a year ago I am glad this has had time for the deep citrus and acidity to mellow a touch, leaving this in a perfect drinking window right now. This is more aromatic than you might think, of lime juice, fresh thai basil and the inside of a beeswax-lined concrete tank. I find this quite complex in those terms and then fine if light on the palate. Must be from a tight and cloudy ferment, locked in and wrapped with great protection in its environment, like in a womb, with some semillon-esque, waxy character, gassy and aerified I can see this developing some honey post green figs and lime though it is broader on the palate with some honey dew adding to the green fig. Really needs grilled fish and a good chill. Drink 2017-2021.  Tasted May 2017  @vpapagiannakos  @MajesticWineInc  papagiannakos  majesticwinesinc  Papagiannakos Wines  @majesticwinecellars

Vidiano

Karavitakis Winery Klima Vidiano 2015, Crete, Greece (Agent, $23.00, WineAlign)

Klima, Greek for climate but also grapevine. Vidiano, indigenous to Crete, Chania to be specific, the Venetian Harbour, on the north coast. What the varietal brings (as opposed to let’s say to assyrtiko) is a tropical aroma profile and a fruitiness that the mineral one does not normally do. The peach-apricot-nectarine thing is almost like pinot gris but this is Greece so don’t be fooled. Rocks, stones and ancient script can’t help but define the line and the architecture of the wine. There is firm grip on the palate and because it grabs hold and holds on, this lingers for quite some time. I really like that length. Drink 2017-2020.  Tasted May 2017  @karavitakiswine  @VictoryWine  #karavitakiswinery  victorywineandspiritsinc Nikos Karavitakis  Victory Wine & Spirits Inc.

Pop goes the world. Tasting #popart #evia with Dimitrios @LykosWinery #prowein2017

White Blends

Lykos Winery Pop Art White 2016, Pgi Evia, Greece (AgentWineAlign)

Pop Art White combines the round and ripe ideals of athiri with aromatic malagousia and at 12 per cent alcohol is light, bright and yet has some weight to it. As much lime as lemon (so it must be the athiri that gives the lime), so easy and consumable (though I am actually quite partial it the sister red) but this represents terrific value for straight up grilled fish. Drink 2017-2019.  Tasted March 2017  @LYKOSWINERY  lykounanalykoswineryevia  @LykosWinery

Seméli Oreinos Helios White 2016, PGI Peloponnese, Greece (477554, $16.95, WineAlign)

The increasingly complimentary bedfellows of moschofilero and sauvignon blanc get together in this Seméli white for aromatic genius, faux botrytis heaven and dry extract success. Though this dries out with its unusually formidable grape tannin there is a linger of citrus and peach juicy elastic plasticity that is just great. Wonderful and playful Peloponnese value. Drink 2017-2019.  Tasted May 2017  @SemeliWines     #semeliwines  #artisanalwineimports  @SemeliWines  @artisanalwineimports

 

Domaine Sigalas Assyrtiko Athiri 2016, Santorini, Greece (Agent, $19.90, WineAlign)

The double A is an assyrtiko (75 per cent) and athiri blend, the latter helping to gift access for earlier drinking. Never wavers from its aromatic roots and necessity. Citrus bitters are prevalent but in the lithest way and only really in design to draw it all together. So drinkable but does not forget that its primary responsibility is tethered to an assyrtiko injunction. For people who don’t quite understand the mineral way or the highway. Drink 2017-2019.  Tasted May 2017  @DomaineSigalas  @MajesticWineInc  domainesigalas  @DomaineSigalas  Panayiota Kalogeropoulou

Wine Art Techni Alipias White 2016, Drama, Greece (Agent, $20.95, WineAlign)

Techni Alipias is primarily sauvignon blanc (80 per cent) mixed with assyrtiko and the nomenclature tells us this wine speaks to the art of “helping people forget their sorrows.” The vines are found near Mt. Pangeon, a Dionysian cult locale now in the land of Drama. The drama in this blend is subtle, the aromas all about citrus and the texture quite a mouthful to contend with. A highly distracting wine so if you are having a bad day this will do the trick with its tragicomedy mix of tart fruit and round acidity. Drink it with fried little fishes and calamari. Drink 2017-2018.  Tasted May 2017  @wineartestate  @KolonakiGroup  wine_art_estate  kolonakigroup  @wine.artestate  @KolonakiGroup

Reds

Agiorgitiko

Domaine Vassiliou Agiorgitiko 2008, PDO Nemea, Greece (WineAlign)

Vassilou’s Nemea agiorgitiko delves even deeper into the fig, raisin and old wood, comparable to an old school reserva tempranillo stylistic. It’s certainly got a musty note in a cool, sheltered from the storm, inside a cave stalactite and stalagmite way. Burnt orange is the dominant flavour in what is ostensibly and seriously rustic stuff. The fruit dries out with leafy compost yet structure and therefore age ability is king. Drink 2017-2020.  Tasted May 2017  @VassiliouNemeio  #domainevassiliou  Domaine Vassiliou – Nemeion Estate / Κτήμα Βασιλείου – Κτήμα Νέμειον

Lykos Winery Kratistos 2013, Pdo Nemea, Greece (Agent, $18.95, WineAlign)

Kratistos PDO Nemea 2013 is 100 per cent agiorgitiko and one of the first wines produced by Apostolos and Athena (Nana) Lykou. As per the marriage of varietal and place it takes a statist approach, with rusty and developed fruit, of strawberry, raspberry and red currant that takes a savoury turn. And then it silkens on the palate, as expected. This really helps to define and perpetuate the Greek red religion, drinkable and ageable, agreeable and to prudence by stashing some away. This is the Lykos high end agiorgitiko, one year in barrel with six types of barrels employed, all with varying toasts. Great length and the wood is merely a conduit of spice, texture and length. Really well done and shows that this winemaker has a way with reds. Drink 2018-2022.  Tasted March 2017  @LYKOSWINERY  lykounanalykoswineryevia  @LykosWinery

Troupis Fteri Agiorgitiko 2015, PGI Peloponnese, Greece (Agent, $18.95, WineAlign)

Fteri from Yiannis Troupis is bright and ripe for the oft dusty and cured St. George, here in clean, pure, crisp form. Seemingly void of dried fruit, out of tank and no barrel, this is the fresh maker, ready for the here and now. It’s just bloody delicious, of plums and cherries, refreshing and miles from rustic. At $16 back up the truck because this could be the gamay or sangiovese of your summer dreams, or a marriage of the two. remarkable. Luminous, naturally fortified by dry extract and sweet tannin favour. The final cut is the chew, like a bite into a rare steak with no game. Drink 2017-2018.  Tasted May 2017  @TroupisWinery  @VictoryWine  troupiswinery  victorywineandspiritsinc  @troupis.winery  Victory Wine & Spirits Inc. 

Skouras Saint George Agiorgitiko 2013, AOP Nemea, Greece (Agent, $19.95, WineAlign)

Both Saint George and Aghiorhitiko grace the label (not agiorgitiko) in this juicy and rambling red, full of tangy red fruit and bright, if quite vivid acidity. There is a good amount of chew and then some baking spice bite on the quick finish. Drink 2017-2018.  Tasted May 2017  @DOMAINESKOURAS  @KolonakiGroup  skourasdomaine  @KolonakiGroup  @domaineskouras

Gaia Agiorgitiko Nemea 2015, Greece (Agent, $21.30, WineAlign)

From Koutsi in Nemea, Gaia’s 100 per cent agiorgitiko is wonderfully dusty, ripe and modern, like clean and pure merlot in a way, with mulberry and raspberry fruit notes followed by bushy mountain savour. There is this perfectly tidy sour tang on the palate that mingles nicely with the early dusty and leathery notes, creating a kind of agiorgitiko liqueur that only it can exude. It’s like Rosso di Montalcino or more like Tuscan IGT (with merlot adding to sangiovese). A chewy and crunchy mouthful to be sure and blessed with a shot of bitters and very good length. Drink 2018-2021.  Tasted May 2017  @GaiaWines  @Smallwinemakers  gaiawines  @GaiaWinesGR  @smallwinemakerscollection

Ktima Papaioannou Single Vineyard Old Vines Agiorgitiko 2010, Nemea, Greece (Agent, $33.95, WineAlign)

The oldest vines from the endemic Nemea grape are chosen for this 17,000 bottle lot, an agiorgitiko of native charm and relevant substance. Substantial in fruit and beautifully rustic, dried fruit and potpourri aromas, the texture is complacently integrated now ten years after bottling. The happy blues of its notes are sung with painless refrain, with cedar, leather, resin and fine-spun acidity all rolled in, some baking spice and the tonic abilities of aperitifs. The vegetal component is not green but it is an oxidative style, pretty, woody and wild. A spoonful or a cupful, whichever your pleasure, will do just fine. “Could fill spoons full of coffee, could fill spoons full of tea. Just a little spoon of your precious love; Is that enough for me?” Drink 2017-2019.  Tasted May 2017    @KolonakiGroup  @KolonakiGroup

Cabernet Sauvignon

Domain Mega Spileo Cabernet Sauvignon 2009, Peloponnese, Greece (Agent, $27.95, WineAlign)

Such varietal accuracy is an exceptionality of Stelios Tsiris’ “Megali Ambelos,” great vineyard gifted cabernet sauvignon. The plateau narrative spoken at 800m along the Diakofto-Kalavrita Road above Vouraikos canyon is not unlike the endemic vernacular but with a firm handshake and bold tannin. The palate is silky and pleasantly savoury, then tart but intensely so. The alcohol measures 15 per cent but is handled with refined power. Like Stelios there is a gentle, polite and powerful confidence with length to scamper up and down the Vouraikos slopes, up to the monastery and back. We’re also dealing with 15-20 years of possibility. Mega Spileo’s is one of the top Greek cabernet sauvignon. Two are better than one. Drink 2017-2026.  Tasted March 2017    @apostolosGW  #MegaSpileo  Apostolos Gerakinis

Limniona

Tsililis Limniona 2013, PGI Meteora, Greece (WineAlign)

Limniona is the newest of discoveries, a highly aromatic red, with dried fruit like agiorgitiko, but here from Theopetra Estate in Thessaly, Northern (Central) Greece. There is a minty peach and pomegranate aromatic and texture in a real stretched, elastic and bounce back way, with structure like nebbiolo but with more intense poly-phenolic character. I don’t find this bretty or funky at all but rather as a wild floral and fruit display like a rustic Langhe, with dust and diesel. It’s also savoury like cabernet franc and of something nutty (like Nutella), which is really the barrel talking in smooth ganache chocolate lingo. You’ve got to try this. Drink 2017-2019.  Tasted May 2017    #theopetraestate

Tetramythos Winery

Mavro Kalavryta

Domaine Tetramythos Kalavryta 2016, PGI Achaia, Peloponnese, Greece (SAQ 11885457, $17.05, WineAlign)

This mavro kalavryta repeats the same alcohol and acidity as 2014 and the tune sees no change. Once again we are graced with a back up the track, gamay-nerello mascalese-cabernet franc-fresh tempranillo vein, still so fresh and even minor reductive and chewy. So freakin’ delicious. Drink 2017-2021.  Tasted March 2017  @Tetramythos  #tetramythoswines  @tetramythoswines  Devon Masciangelo

A sneak peek of @thymiopoulosvin ’15’s was reason enough to fly all the way to #paris #gareaugorille #rapsani #xinomavro #terreetciel #earthandsky #apostolosthymiopoulos

Xinomavro

Boutari Grande Reserve Naoussa 2010, Naoussa, Greece (140111, $17.95, WineAlign)

Naoussa Xinomavro with six years of age is just a baby, seemingly evolved but in so many ways, anything but. The fruit aromas are dried, from raisin to fig and the accents are all kalamata olive and date. This has real drying tannins and a savoury, dusty, musty feel. In 2010 it’s still very good, cementing more legacy defining consistency, but it’s not the best ever. Drink 2016-2020.  Tasted April 2016 and May 2017  @boutari  @KolonakiGroup  @DrinkGreekWine  @winesofnaoussa

Thymiopoulos Xinomavro 2014, PDO Naoussa, Greece (Agent, $19.95, WineAlign)

There is certainly more earth than sky this time around, probably because you couldn’t see it through all the rain. In a tough (and nearly disastrous) vintage that will test a winemaker’s mettle, it’s a good thing to have some history in pocket to draw upon and help pull you through. “My family has always been growing grapes,” tells Apostolos Thymiopoulos. They sold off their crop to other wineries but that changed in 2003 when Apostolos returned from having finished his oenology studies. His father was a long time practitioner of organics and Apostolos didn’t know why but today he knows and is thankful for it. Healthy vineyards, low yields and a father’s acumen now help to plough through adversity. The declassified fruit (with no Earth and Sky produced) sees the volatility and acidity down in ’14, but there is no compromise to the purity from a pure terroir. Texture and complex flavours are also compromised but again, purity can never be denied. Drink this honest, direct, ruby, deep rosey and ropey xinomavro for the next two years while both the haughty ’13 and ’15 bottles of Earth and Sky rest, evolve and eventually settle into their skins. Drink 2017-2019.  Tasted November 2016 and May 2017  @thymiopoulosvin  @VictoryWine  @winesofnaoussa  apostolosthymiopoulos  eletsi  victorywineandspiritsinc  Eleftheria Tsitsipa  Victory Wine & Spirits Inc.  @WinesofNaoussa

Thymiopoulos Young Vines Xinomavro 2015, PDO Naoussa, Greece (Agent, $20.00, WineAlign)

Here is the Naoussa little angel xinomavro affiche sans barrel, just pure, unadulterated, elastic and playful fruit in a glass. The xinomavro that everyone should know and love, enjoy with reckless, gulpable abandon and put seriousness aside. From 2015, a “3000 per cent better vintage than ’14” says Apostolos Thymiopoulos with a smile of relief and bounce back determination. There was some rain but not too hard so this Young Vines is able and enterprising to dance the passionate Thymiopoulos two-step, from the earth and with a momentary gaze up to the sky. The last thing you need to know is how lithe and ethereal this is, like pinot noir, in Naoussa, with xinomavro. Drink 2017-2020.  Tasted May 2017  @thymiopoulosvin  @VictoryWine  @winesofnaoussa  apostolosthymiopoulos  eletsi  victorywineandspiritsinc  Eleftheria Tsitsipa  Victory Wine & Spirits Inc.  @WinesofNaoussa

Thymiopoulos Terre Et Ciel Xinomavro Unfiltered 2015, PDO Naoussa, Greece (Agent, $35.23, WineAlign)

The Thymiopoulos estate vineyards are located in two villages, Trilofos and Fytia. The blend of the two is this flagship xinomavro, Yn Kai Oupavós. Known to us mere western mortals as Earth and Sky, the organic one from Apostolos Thymiopoulos and Eleftheria Tsitsipas picks up where the cherry chewy and very elongated 2013 left off (because 2014 was a difficult and therefore declassified vintage). The house habit of natural fermentation allows xinomavro to do the natural habitat, naturalist’s way, to look into the grape’s mirror and see its reflection naked, pure and clear. This is my second tasting of the ’15 Earth and Sky and though it continues to show some volatility (in the most beneficial way) it has settled (since November) and is now developing its second skin. The leathery hide was quite tough to begin and now gives off a sheen and sweet perfume that only this wine can gift. It also delivers a shot of honeyed, microbial goodness (in the context of its seamless package) with dance party energy. You will taste few wines like this and have not lived until you do. There is genius in this developing story, still in its infancy and on the road to legendary. Mythical even. One for and with the vine. Drink 2018-2028.  Tasted November 2016 and May 2017  @thymiopoulosvin  @VictoryWine  @winesofnaoussa  apostolosthymiopoulos  eletsi  victorywineandspiritsinc  Eleftheria Tsitsipa  Victory Wine & Spirits Inc.  @WinesofNaoussa

Red Blends

Domain Mega Spileo III Cuvée 2014, PGI Achaia, Peloponnese, Greece (Agent, $19.95, WineAlign)

The three varietal blend breaks down as mavrodafne and cabernet sauvignon (40 per cent each) plus agiorgitiko. The liquid chalk shapes into classic Achaia red wine though the mavrodaphne really stands apart. The notes of orange, pomegranate, currant and cranberry develop their combined keen sense of locale tartness. This carries sensory development and a right meets proper sheen, where old and new school meet at the twain. Drink 2017-2019.  Tasted May 2017    @apostolosGW  #MegaSpileo  Apostolos Gerakinis

Domaine Mercouri Red 2014, Vin De Pays Des Letrinon, Greece (213388, $18.70, WineAlign)

A blend of refosco and mavrodaphne, the IGP Leprini from Mercouri is oaky western Peloponnese rusticity at its finest. The nose is wild red berry simple syrup mixed with high-tonal volatility and new leather. The palate follows the thread, like rustic garnacha from Aragon and then a shot of adrenaline mixed with absinthe bitters. For fans of the deep smoky and oaky Greek style. Drink 2017-2019.  Tasted May 2017

Spiropoulos Porfyros 2013, Peloponnese, Greece (252147, $19.85, WineAlign)

The expatriate Bordeaux grapes cabernet sauvignon, cabernet franc and merlot join with organic agiorgitioko for a dark, hematic, ferric and rustic red, of more barrel than fruit. It’s hard to get past the wood, in fact the high-toned and wild-eyed hopeful fruit is suffocated under that milkshake sheathing. The attempt here is more west coast California than anything else but the result is savoury-syrupy and overly sour acidic in the end. If you like it earthy, robust and glossy then by all means. A deep braise of lamb shanks would help the cause. Drink 2018-2021.  Tasted May 2017

Askitikos Red 2013, Thessalia, Greece (485938, $19.95, WineAlign)

This is a highly modern blend of agiorgitiko, syrah and cabernet sauvignon from Thessalia with plenty of ripeness, dark fruit notes and ample wood spice. It carries quite the moderate temper and nice balance between fruit and acidity with easy on the palate tannin. Nothing shocking or out of the ordinary and could be from just about anywhere in Greece. Drink 2017-20219.  Tasted April 2017    #askitikos

Gaia Wines “S” 2014, PGI Peloponnese, Greece (AgentWineAlign)

From the Koutsi hillside, the sensory blend is agiorgitiko (70 per cent) and syrah, a stunning, speculative, modern Greek paradoxical study. Youthful, tannic and structured, here comes the sun from Yiannis Paraskevopoulos, with eyes, mouth and mind wide open. Antinori’s Tignanello may be the inspiration but this Super Nemea is all Greece. Black fruit and silky texrure as expected but once again, the place is the dynamic and the answer to the illimitable mystery. Drink 2017-2023.  Tasted May 2017  @GaiaWines  @Smallwinemakers  gaiawines  #smallwinemakerscollection  @GaiaWinesGR  @smallwinemakerscollection  

Mega Spileo Monastery

Domain Mega Spileo Red 2010, Peloponnese, Greece (466110, $29.95, WineAlign)

From one of the great vineyards in the Peloponnese, or all of Europe for that matter, Mega Spileo (Grand Cave) is set within a dramatically oriented steppe of an amphitheatre, in a bowl beneath the shadow of a 940m rock that houses the great Greek Orthodox monastery of Mega Spileo. Nowhere else in the Chelmos mountains does monk viticulture resonate as it does here. Perched above the Vouraikos Canyon at 800m of height, the vineyard sits like a slowly lowered field, dropped down past the granite walls to settle in its place. Winemaker Stelios Tsiris makes this ambitious Greek red, with generous old oak fashion and despite its dried fruit and old, dry tar personality, its spirit is lifted with great Greek acidity. It’s rustic, deferential and so interesting to behold. Drink 2017-2020.  Tasted January 2017

Kir Yianni Two Olives 2013, PGI Imathia, Greece (Agent, $33.95, WineAlign)

“Dyo Elies,” or two olives is a blend of syrah, merlot and xinomavro from Naoussa, ripe, sheathed in beneficial oak and ripping with sweet and sour acidity. This is a decidedly firm and grippy blend, quite tannic and with length for days. The moniker is quite apropos because this solicits thoughts of those typical Mediterranean notes, of black olive and garrigue. I’m not sure the olives is so approachable yet, even at four years from harvest and would suggest waiting a further two (or even four) to dig in. Drink 2019-2024.  Tasted May 2017  @kiryianni  @KolonakiGroup  kiryianni  kolonakigroup  @KirYianni  @KolonakiGroup

Black Corinthian Raisin in early stages of veraison #manyshadesofachaia #prettyinpeloponnese

Good to go!

Godello

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