VINTAGES preview April 1st

When you see one grand cru you’ve seen another grand cru #nierstein #rheinhessen #rhein

Globe-trekking critics, be a fool for value, plug in to musical Ontario and align with new world pioneers

as seen on WineAlign

Last Thursday I flew home from Germany after attending Prowein 2017, a massive wine fair in Düsseldorf that has to be seen to be believed. Picture nine immense convention halls each the size, depth and breadth of a Canadian football field, connected to one another and circling a courtyard like hangars in surround of incoming and outgoing flights at a major airport. The sheer quantity of human power and logistical planning required to facilitate and execute such a congress is in fact not unlike what happens every day at Frankfurt International. There may not be 100,000 employed to run Prowein, but at least that many wine stems are engaged.

It’s also hard to believe that this time yesterday I was standing on the crest of the red sandstone Grand Cru Neirstein vineyards overlooking the Rhein River. In advance of my trip to Germany I had the chance to taste through next weekend’s VINTAGES April 1st release and you will be pleased to find no shortage of quality wines under $20, many of which will solve your in advance of Easter needs. A token pinot noir with an anything but token twist and two hopping chardonnays are included for classic holiday food and wine association but I dig deeper into soils, varietal diversification and terroir for holiday pairing perfection.

There is no secret that Spain and Portugal sit at or near the pinnacle of Ontario consumer go to picks in the genre occupied by bargain reds. While the two recommendations below will certainly pair well with a feast of festive proportions, they also resurrect some grape varieties you might not automatically consider. Alentejo in Portugal and Castilla Y Léon in Spain offer great opportunities to discover local, endemic, world-class red wines. This early spring Ontario cold snap will soon be a thing of 2017’s winter past so I would suggest to get that BBQ tune-up completed because these wines are perfect foils for anything you can throw on the grill.

Travelling brings us together with the leaders and pioneers of fast-tracking and emerging wine regions and it is the global nature of this industry that through their own travels, they are brought to us. In September of 2015 I had the great fortune to spend a night and better part of a day with South Africa’s Ken Forrester. You will have noticed that Western Cape chenin blanc has taken the world by value storm over the last three to four years. There are several reasons for the varietal explosion, two of which are geology and climate. The third worth mentioning is Ken Forrester himself. When I tasted with Ken in Stellenbosch we travelled through half a dozen or more blocks, plots, vineyards and stylistically framed steen. Each and every year his Old Vines Reserve passes through VINTAGES. It is perfectly consistent and sets the benchmark for inexpensive and excellent South African chenin blanc genius.

Nicolás Zapata Catena and his daughter Dr. Laura Catena have pioneered similar if even deeper industry-leading work in Mendoza, Argentina. The father-daughter dream team have crafted terroir-focused Malbec and other well suited to time and place varietal wines. Over the past few years the Catena brand has expanded their portfolio by narrowing their focus into micro-terroirs in highly specific spots all over Mendoza. It’s not just Catena that has taken this brilliant South American approach to branding and this April 1st VINTAGES release is chock full of such precise varietal wines. Though I of course would be thrilled to offer up credit to the power brokers and buyers that be I’m not sure I’d give in to the idea that the grouping was executed with any preconceived plan. The patterning, by coincidence or not is nevertheless highly welcomed and I’m pleased to share these wines with you.

The Ontario presence is strong, as it should be, on the heels of a terrific Taste Ontario that was as promising as it was not surprisingly expected. Stratus hits the riesling mark with Wildass abandon, Flat Rock plays its annual MTV chardonnay tune and Thirty Bench does a varietal two-step that may just blow your mind. We should all be thankful for our local talent and in constant awe of Ontario’s wine ability to step out of its comfort zone, consistently improve on what it already does best and find ways to re-invent the wheel.

With the incantevole @chianticlassico hills fading from view, thank you #toscana #anteprime2017 #anteprimeditoscana #chianticlassico #vinonobiledimontepulciano #brunellodimontalcino

Speaking of Ontario, David Lawrason and I are still reeling from three days spent with an impressive Canadian ambassadorship contingent stationed in Düsseldorf’s Messe Prowein centre, sent there to spread the cool climate wine gospel to the world. The enthusiastic demands on our collective time were great. We will expand on the success of Canada’s presence on this important world stage in the coming weeks. John and Sara have also been on the road, globetrotting to the far reaches of the wine diaspora. It’s getting hard to track who might be where at any given time but in the first three months of 2017 we’ve had at least California, Oregon, Uruguay, Chianti Classico, Montepulciano, Montalcino, Lazio, The Ahr Valley, The Rheinhessen and every corner of New Zealand covered.

Through the course of our travels we are granted the opportunity to meet producers and winemakers, taste their wines and we often come across exciting products not seen before in Ontario. These discoveries are becoming increasingly important because the agents in Ontario receive an assisted head start on finding new wines. With the WineAlign Exchange inching closer and closer to bringing the reality of expert curation to wine buying and purchasing in Ontario, the connections we forge to these values and gems may soon see to finding their way into your cellars and your glass.

Godello’s Buyer’s Guide to VINTAGES April 1st:

Musical Ontario

Stratus Vineyards Riesling Wildass 2015, VQA Niagara Peninsula, Ontario (129700, $16.95, WineAlign)

It’s really hard to say whether Stratus Vineyards’ J.L Groux is more adept as a varietal impresario or as a master of assemblage so we’ll just call it a tie. Here into the riesling game he goes in the mere mortal affordable Wildass range and in 2015 he plays a smart varietal tune. You’ve just got to get some Wildass.  @StratusWines

Flat Rock Chardonnay Unplugged 2015, VQA Niagara Peninsula, Ontario (68015, $16.95, WineAlign)

The record keeps playing in rotation and the string remains unbroken with yet another quality vintage for the unoaked from Flat Rock. The crunchy apple and righteous waves of pertinence make this perennial best buy a required spin without any wonder why.  @Winemakersboots  @brightlighter1  @UnfilteredEd  @wine_gems

Thirty Bench Winemaker’s Blend Double Noir 2015, VQA Niagara Peninsula, Ontario (493973, $18.95, WineAlign)

The nomenclature is just so perfectly chosen and as you will find, this is a seamless joint between pinot and gamay noir. Double Noir performs the passe tout grains oeuvre from Ontario in combining two expatriate Burgundy grapes. I’ve long ago agreed these two make anything but strange bedfellows and the two grapes work seamlessly in Emma Garner’s new and idealistic red. Well done Thirty Bench. Pass the two grapes over, SVP.  @ThirtyBench

Align with new world pioneers

Ken Forrester Chenin Blanc Old Vine Reserve 2016, WO Stellenbosch, South Africa (231282, $17.95, WineAlign)

Reserve is a funny term for wines like this because it speaks to the idea that it should be put aside fore further use. I don’t think that is Ken Forrester’s plan and here he once again raises his old vines game with the 2016 chenin blanc. Stellenbosch continues to dole out some of the planet’s most striking and finest whites with chenin blanc at the centre of it’s value universe. With major thanks to Ken Forrester.  @KFwines  @WOSACanada  @WOSA_ZA  @Noble_Estates

In Situ Reserva Carmenère 2015, Aconcagua Valley, Chile (37952, $16.95, WineAlign)

In case you were wondering too, “In Situ is crafted from grapes that ripen on steep slopes alongside mysterious rock drawings from ages past.” The only expansion on that bit of ambiguity I can share is the purity and clarity levels of carmenère are fully explained in this Reserva. Another fine BBQ wine for April flowers and showers.  @InSituWine  @WinesOfChile_CA  @WinesofChile

Echeverria Cabernet Sauvignon Limited Edition 2011, Central Valley, Chile (389221, $24.95, WineAlign)

Though labeled as cabernet sauvignon the Limited Edition is generously supported by syrah and carmenère, resulting in a layered and grossly rich red blend. The individual varieties don’t really stake any obvious claim and while their integration is not exactly seamless, the layering back and forth over one another does work some Central Valley magic. Complexity wins points.  @VinaEcheverria  @LiffordON  @WinesOfChile_CA  @WinesofChile

Catena Malbec Appellation Paraje 2014, Mendoza, Argentina (492413, $22.95, WineAlign)

Last November Dr. Laura Catena told a small Ontario press audience “it’s a fact. Different soils give different flavours.” The WineAlign team had previously sat down with winemaker Ernesto Badja for a full-on, wide-scale investigation into a climat-precise and compendious look at the proselytism of Catena culture. Paraje Altamira was one of these such looks into single-vineyard terroir.  @CatenaMalbec  @LauraCatena  @Noble_Estates  @ArgentinaWineCA  @winesofarg

Trapiche Malbec Perfiles Calcareous 2015, Mendoza, Argentina (482083, $18.95, WineAlign)

The savvy marketed Trapiche foray into soil matters with malbec divines the intention that calcaire (calcareo) brings speciality to these Uco Valley vines. It’s not a huge stretch to sense some limestone in this malbec’s make-up and I am wholly impressed by its countenance, its continuity from nose to tail and yes, its mineral feeling. So glad Trapiche is onside. @TrapicheWines  @Dandurandwines  @ArgentinaWineCA  @winesofarg

The best of the rest

Paulo Laureano Reserve Tinto 2014, Vidigueira, DOC Alentejo, Portugal (488775, $19.95, WineAlign)

From the still somewhat unheralded and rising to stardom Alentejo the grape expectation here from vidigueira is no shrinking Reserve. This would make for a curious consumer side step into something different but at the same time so obvious and comfortable. At this price you can’t afford to do neither.    @winesportugalCA  @wines_portugal  @Nicholaspearce_

Senorio de la Antigua Mencía 2012, IGP Castilla y Léon, Spain (481549, $13.95, WineAlign)

Some solid and in some circles, very old estate vines (30-50 years) in Villafranca del Bierzo gift mencia for a pittance. Rarely does a $14 old world red give so much for so little. Great round acidity and length off the cuff of a vibrant tune. Simply great value. One of the best you will find all year.  @WinesofSpainSL  @Wines_fromSpain

Groth Chardonnay Hillview Vineyard 2014, Napa Valley, California (225672, $57.95, WineAlign)

From a 44-acre Yountville vineyard founded in 1982 and (mostly) re-planted in 1996. This is a perfect and prime example of all the right directions Napa Chardonnay has taken in the last 10 years, with kudos to Suzanne Groth for embracing the ideal, from restraint, for elegance and in balance.  @GrothWines  @suzgroth  @CalifWines_CA  @CalifWines_US  @NapaVintners  @TheVine_RobGroh

Dutschke Shiraz GHR Neigbours 2013, Lyndoch, Barossa Valley, South Australia (247296, $26.95, WineAlign)

You just have to let go and find the fun in this Gods Hill Road shiraz, a wine of deep-rooted flavour. The utter deliciousness and unctuousness of Barossa is capitulated and catapulted into Lyndoch space. To say that charred meats hot of the grill would work perfectly right now would be utterly correct. To see this age for up to 10 years and eke out more elegance is also true. I would suggest endeavouring in both.  @DutschkeWines  @Wine_Australia

Glaetzer Shiraz Bishop 2015, Barossa Valley, South Australia (627869, $39.95, WineAlign)

Ben Glaetzer’s incredible value Heartland cabernet sauvignon from this same release is not to be missed but I’ve chosen to focus on his flagship shiraz. From son Ben in ode to mother Judith, Bishop the maternal maiden name is the rock of the estate’s Barossa Valley reds. Bishop is a serious wine to be sure and this really leaves so much behind in the mouth long after it’s been sipped.  @GlaetzerWines  @Wine_Australia  @TheVine_RobGroh

Louis Moreau Chablis Domaine de Biéville 2015, Burgundy, France (106161, $27.95, WineAlign)

Just last week I stood in Moreau’s booth at Prowein and I talked with Frédérique Chamoy. She noted how excited buyers are about the 2015 Chablis. If you were ever to take the kimmeridgian plunge this quintessential Moreau and this vintage are the place to start, Pure, classic mineral Chablis with more fruit than I’ve ever seen.  @MoreauLouis1  @vinsdechablis  

Brancaia Chianti Classico Riserva 2013, DOCG Tuscany, Italy (260802, $36.95, WineAlign)

Brancaia goes all in to exploit sangiovese and the for broke style solicits some patience to wait out in extra time. Though 16 months in barrel is nothing to call nothing it is not the wood that dominates these gregarious 2013 grapes. With time this swirls into a grosso sangiovese like liqueur with plums, cherries and spice. Really Riserva in style but not of the recent past, more like the older ways but translated to modern times.  @CasaBrancaia  @chianticlassico  @ChiantiClassUSA  @Noble_Estates

La Lecciaia Brunello di Montalcino Riserva 2010, DOCG Tuscany, Italy (241307, $69.95, WineAlign)

From the giving 2010 vintage and so beautifully so gifted here with La Lecciaia’s 2010 Riserva. Sangiovese that rests in such an ethereal nether-land will evolve with decades long grace. Classic would be one way of looking at it, heart-warming another and it’s remarkably ready to drink.      

It’s been a whirlwind of a start to 2017 and I am personally glad to be home, for now, even if it’s only for a short time. After all, there are too many wine discoveries out there and if were to let them pass me by I would not be Godello. So before too long I will head back out on the road, join the fairs, searches, digs and bring some love back home. As for now it is the April 1st release that deserves our full attention. Sara will bring best buys and new finds next week. Looking forward to April 15th David and John will return with your first in line VINTAGES picks. Until then, good luck with the hunt, have a Happy Easter and an equally happy Passover.

Good to go!

Godello

Twitter: @mgodello

Instagram: mgodello

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Quick link to Michael’s WineAlign Mix

Seven Grothic tales

Vintage to vintage nuance and the common thread of %22grothiness,%22 or, @GrothWines in essence @TheVine_RobGroh #suzannegroth #napavalley #oakville #cabernetsauvignon

Vintage to vintage nuance and the common thread of grothiness, or, @GrothWines in essence @TheVine_RobGroh #suzannegroth #napavalley #oakville #cabernetsauvignon

In February, at Cuvaison Estate in Carneros, Napa Valley, I tasted Groth’s 1987 Reserve Cabernet Sauvignon. “Definitely tastes like Cabernet from the 1980’s,” said Suzanne Groth with a shrug.  I’ve now tasted Cabernet by Groth from vintages spanning the last four decades. The ’97 tasted like Cabernet from the 1990’s, the 2005, 2006 and 2007 from that decade and the 2012, well, you get the picture. Grothiness, Groth in essence and a touch of Groth are all a thing. So are the notions of time specific and era representative. At any point in Napa Valley’s last 40-plus years of winemaking history, you could count on a Groth Cabernet to capture the moment in a time capsule. Grothic tales.

During that February tasting in Napa, a question of age was at the forefront of the discussion. Putting a finger on the Valley’s long-term capabilities is not yet imprinted as a foregone conclusion but increasingly wines from the 1970’s and 1980’s are laid bare in longevity reveal. Case in point Robert Mondavi. At Groth, despite all the changes and re-plants, age ability is still the goal despite not knowing how long the wines can actually age.

Related – Napa Valley two: A question of age

Groth Vineyards was founded in 1981 by Dennis and Judith in the heart of the Oakville appellation. First crush was in 1982, the winery was finished in 1990 and expansion of the fermentation and barrel cellar was completed in 2007. Michael Weis is Director of Winemaking and he was instrumental in the decision to re-plant Oakville blocks to Cabernet Sauvignon in 1999 ands 2000. Cameron Parry is the winemaker. The Oakville vineyard is planted to Cabernet (55 acres), Sauvignon Blanc (32) and Semillon (11). The Hillview Vineyard is planted to Merlot (12) and Chardonnay (26). Half of the acreage in Oakville is dedicated to the flagship Reserve Cabernet Sauvignon. Cameron Parry spoke to the 2012 vintage saying, “it was back to normal in 2012 and here in Oakville normal is awesome.’

The Vine Agency’s Robert Groh brought Suzanne and her family’s portfolio to the Chef’s House at Toronto’s George Brown College in May. Here is what we tasted.

My #napavalley education according to @GrothWines continues with @TheVine_RobGroh #suzannegroth #oakville #cabernetsauvignon #chardonnay #sauvignonblanc

My #napavalley education according to @GrothWines continues with @TheVine_RobGroh #suzannegroth #oakville #cabernetsauvignon #chardonnay #sauvignonblanc

Groth Sauvignon Blanc 2014, Oakville, Napa Valley, California (Agent, $41.95, WineAlign)

Groth’s Sauvignon Blanc comes from vines planted in black clay on the eastern block of a former dairy ranch. Winemaker Michael Weiss knew the terroir was not blessed to ripen red varietals and the SB plan (with the reins now taken over by Cameron Parry) shies away from vivid, pungent aromatic realities, i.e. no cat’s pee. With nine per cent Sémillon (highest to date) mixed in “we knew more would be better” notes Suzanne Groth. Weiss wanted to showcase warm climate Sauvignon Blanc, but in a crisp, clean and sur-lie (70-90 days) flavour-texture compendium. The blend is actually figured in the field, not post crush. It’s whole cluster pressed and spends four plus years in aged French barrels. It gets to stone fruit with Sem’s sharp accents, of acidity to line up the usual warm climate roundness of SB. It’s a real treat of extract meets tannin impression, with top notch length and impeccable balance from start to finish. This is warm Sauvignon Blanc to be sure but there is no mistaking the parity. Drink 2016-2019.  Tasted April 2016

Groth Chardonnay Hillview Vineyard 2014, Napa Valley, California (Agent, $64.95, WineAlign)

From a 44-acre Yountville vineyard founded in 1982 and (mostly) re-planted in 1996. High caste Chardonnay thanks to whole cluster pressing, a long, cool fermentation, assistance from old and new barrels and time spent on the lees. The wildness is tamed, the aromas are brilliant and the flavours deep, creamy and spiced. This is a perfect and prime example of all the right directions Napa Chardonnay has taken in the last 10 years, with kudos to Suzanne Groth for embracing the ideal, from restraint, for elegance and in balance. Drink 2017-2026.  Tasted April 2016

Groth Cabernet Sauvignon 2005, Oakville, Napa Valley, California (Agent, $64.95, WineAlign)

Suzanne Groth introduces her family’s tween Estate Cab as “being from the Cabernet ghetto that is Oakville,” a quip not lost on the concept of the sub-appellation’s fractional singularity. From the first of a string of cool vintages. Just a fleeting, secondary hint of what was noticed in the golden 1987, a savoury flirting with truflle and soy but of course, so very floral. Merlot (somewhere between 22-24 per cent) was blended in, then French oak for 22 months (50 per cent new). A “Grothiness” is guaranteed, as per the house style, valley floor indicative, making for travel down a silk road. This is antithetic to mountain wine and caressing when it comes to tannin. All three vintages tasted side by each (2005-2007) share an affinity in ability to balance out the young, brutish cabernet, with black pepper liquified in mouth-coating, satin sheathing. Will live another 11 years, almost, if not quite like that ’87. Drink 2016-2027.  Tasted April 2016

Groth Cabernet Sauvignon 2006, Oakville, Napa Valley, California (Agent, $64.95, WineAlign)

Showing a bit more evolution than the ’05 and a cooler, deeper savour. Red fruit is a bit dried, like Korean red pepper, adhering to espresso dusted pomegranate seeds, plus cranberries and bitter chocolate. A bigger wine within the context of expressing and in duplicity of a cool factor. Still tannic, grippy and amazing. Drink 2016-2025.  Tasted February 2016

Groth Cabernet Sauvignon 2007, Oakville, Napa Valley, California (Agent, $64.95, WineAlign)

Not only the youngest but also easily the least evolved as compared to the 2005 and 2006, which makes sense, but so incredibly fresh and with the most exuberant red fruit and polarizing, corresponding rigid tannins. A wine to recognize the ties that bind from vintage to vintage, in nuance and by the common thread of “grothiness,” or, Groth Wines in essence. This expression is wider ranging and gregarious across the board and while it may not be the most beautiful of the three, it will age the longest. The length is testament to that contention. Drink 2016-2029.  Tasted February 2016

Another @GrothWines question of age with 1997 refusing to grow up @TheVine_RobGroh

Another @GrothWines question of age with 1997 refusing to grow up @TheVine_RobGroh

Groth Cabernet Sauvignon Reserve 1997, Oakville, Napa Valley, California (Agent, $179.95, WineAlign)

It is so very special to be graced the avowal of opportunity to partake in the coming of age with this young Cabernet, the pre-Groth replant wine, from the vines that came with the purchase of the winery. Vines that finished their work in the 1999 vintage. In an oddly decreased, antediluvian aromatic character as compared to the 2005, the soy, truffle and earthy antiquity as it may be imagined is tangled in an intangible collective. Red berry fruit is remarkable in its freshness, from strawberry to raspberry picked just this morning. The palate shows more age but also vitality and energy. The warmth of 1997 has been held at bay, a kept intruder not allowed to smother what idealism the fruit held in confidence. Marks the watershed flow of the churte rock, a sedimentary conclusion that pushes its way through the vines into this reserve Cabernet. What a superlative piece of (what seems like only yesterday) Napa Valley history. Drink 2016-2028.  Tasted April 2016

Groth Cabernet Sauvignon Reserve 2012, Oakville, Napa Valley, California (Agent, $179.95, WineAlign)

Tasted alongside the alluring 1987 with Suzanne Groth. Extremely primary and struck as if by cool fog and mineral mist. Unmelted and unshaken tempered chocolate to be sure, cracked and fissured into shards. The flavours welcome Cassis and graphite with quite the lightning on the tongue. Enervating Cabernet, pulsating and tingling. Should age long but not quite like the 1980’s. Contains 12 per cent Merlot and saw 22 months in 100 per cent oak, but notes Suzanne, “other than that everything is completely different.” Drink 2018-2032.  Tasted February 2016

Good to go!

Twitter: @mgodello

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