Gripping wines from Spain and Italy

Europe

How can winemaking trump terroir?
Photo: 1xpert/Fotolia.com

as seen on canada.com

Winemakers in the most famous regions of Spain and Italy have gone pro in the practicum of wine that speaks loud and clear. If there is a downside it is the blurring of lines and overlapping of circles, where regions set far apart show similar, if near identical characteristics in their wines. How does this happen? How can winemaking trump terroir?

The simple answer is wood. Barrel usage is a global affair, with wineries scouring oak forests the world over to age their wine. French oak is most used and whether you make wine in central Italy or northern Spain, the oak you employ may result in more than just the commonality of wood. If your processes are tied by similar or even identical ties, your wines may taste eerily like one another, if not outright like kissing cousins.

Despite the oligopoly of technique and the lack of winemaking individuality gone viral in this generation, there are three things that continue to work in favour of regional character. The first is obvious. Soil. Or, more importantly, the components, the rocks and minerals that fleck the earth. Secondly, attitude. Call it conceit if you like but when a winemaker has the guts to make wines we like to call grippy, you can’t help but stand up and take notice. Third and so important to the consumer, is price. Spending $15-30 on wines from the most historic locales such as Burgundy and Bordeaux is almost always nonsensical and a waste. No where else in the world offers grip, pomp and pride like Spain and Italy and in that go to mid-price range.

A pentavalent and benevolent group fits this requiem for commercial gain. Rioja, Ribera del Duero and Priorat from Spain. Chianti and Abruzzo in Italy. A Venn diagram of commonality can be agglomerated from their proclivities. It is in these fab five Old World wine regions where a twain of ancient and state of the art collide. Here are seven gripping wines from Spain and Italy.

From left: CEPA 21 HITO 2010, ÉBANO CRIANZA 2008, and RESALTE DE PEÑAFIEL PEÑA ROBLE RESERVA 2004

From left: CEPA 21 HITO 2010, ÉBANO CRIANZA 2008, and RESALTE DE PEÑAFIEL PEÑA ROBLE RESERVA 2004

Ribera Del Duero

The history: Located in north-central Spain, on a plateau, 90 minutes from Madrid. Ribera, or “river bank,” extends from both sides of the Duero. The Denominación de Origen (D.O.) of Ribera del Duero dates back to 1982.

The lowdown: Highest average elevation in Europe for growing red wine grapes. Summers are hot, winters are cold, rainfall is minimal. Lower vineyards are alluvial with sand and reddish clay. Higher ones built of limestone, marl and chalk. Tempranillo in the main grape. Finest recent vintages include 2004, 2009 and 2012.

CEPA 21 HITO 2010, Ribera Del Duero, Spain (360503, $17.95, WineAlign)

Oh the shaken, modern humanity. Nothing shocking here, this 100 per cent Tempranillo parfait of silky chocolate, mixed berries, vanilla and wood chips. Finds parity in biting red cherry flavour. Though it may as well be any ambiguous, heterogeneous or hermaphroditic $30 IGT, its price puts it at the front of the line. Fun to drink, high-toned, textured and structured, though its origins are not at once obvious. Will evolve felicitously for five to seven years.  89  Tasted December 2013  @DrinkRibera

ÉBANO CRIANZA 2008, Ribera Del Duero, Spain (355099, $21.95, WineAlign)

Amid a sea of Spanish reds, this Ribera stands alone as the most modern on the table. Dusty, trenchant dark chocolate, mocha crema, thick, syrupy, rehydrated plum fruit. Accented by both white and black pepper, anise and a late lash of astringent tannin. Abrasive as a pleading Waits croon, this Crianza is “better than a cup of gold. See only a chocolate Jesus can satisfy my soul.” Another Ribera with qualities akin to present day, Sangiovese dominated Chianti Classico. Immaculate confection.  89  Tasted December 2013  @EuroVinatage

RESALTE DE PEÑAFIEL PEÑA ROBLE RESERVA 2004, Ribera Del Duero, Spain  (355107, $31.95, WineAlign)

Typically modern version with just the right amount of age. Interesting to see nearly 10 year-old Ribera, with so much obvious oak and modernity retain its fruit lushness and presence after such a chunk of time could have stripped away its freshness. Candied violets and pansy, peppery nasturtium and marble slab, rocky road ice cream. Oak nearly integrated but persistent in chalky texture. Confounding bareback ride on a wild 100 per cent Tempranillo horse that bucks as if Bordeaux or Rhône varieties would seem to bolster the whole.  90  Tasted December 2013

From left: CIRELLI MONTEPULCIANO D'ABRUZZO 2012, CASTELLO DI QUERCETO CHIANTI CLASSICO 2011, PLANETS DE PRIOR PONS 2009, and ONTAÑÓN RESERVA 2004

From left: CIRELLI MONTEPULCIANO D’ABRUZZO 2012, CASTELLO DI QUERCETO CHIANTI CLASSICO 2011, PLANETS DE PRIOR PONS 2009, and ONTAÑÓN RESERVA 2004

Abruzzo

The history: Central Italy, stretching from the heart of the Apennines to the Adriatic Sea.

The lowdown: Mostly mountainous and wild terrain. The four DOC produced in Abruzzo are the Contro Guerra, Trebbiano d’Abruzzo, Montepulciano d’Abruzzo and Montepulciano d’Abruzzo Colline Teramane. Montepulciano is the most planted red variety. Finest recent vintages include 2006, 2009 and 2010.

CIRELLI MONTEPULCIANO D’ABRUZZO 2012, Abruzzo, Italy (663939, $17.95, WineAlign)

Winemaker superstar to be Francesco Cirelli does what more should do. Age organic grapes of purity and pristine quality in clay Amphore. The natural empathy and wisdom of crop rotation (for more than just grapevines) drives the logic and proportion of Cirelli’s wines. This Md’A smirks and balks at thoughts of it as entry-level, though it concedes to the moniker ’poster child’. From 15 year-old vines set in sandy clay soils near Atri in the Colline Teramane zone. The fruit is like raspberry felt, lifted, spritely, gregarious and inviting. The wine never plunges into bitterness, nor does it depend on any crutch to remain upright and weightless.  90  Tasted September 2013 and January 2014  @TheLivingVine

Chianti

The history: In central Tuscany. The two Chianti zones, Denominazione di origine controllata (DOC) and Denominazione di Origine Controllata e Garantita (DOCG), produce the largest volume of DOC/G wines in Italy.

The lowdown: Chainti Classico must have a minimum 80 per cent Sangiovese, the main variety of the region. Other indigenous grapes include Canaiolo and Colorino, bur Cabernet Sauvignon and Merlot are also used. Soils vary from marl of layered sandstone, to chalk and clay, blue-grey sandstone and clay-limestone. Finest recent vintages include 2006, 2007 and 2011.

CASTELLO DI QUERCETO CHIANTI CLASSICO 2011, Tuscany, Italy  (680496, $22.95, WineAlign)

Heather meadow Sangiovese, emotive of old school Chianti Classico aromas, notably tea, new leather and sour cherry. Texturally succulent and lush, like mini-modern Sangiovese Grosso. Nearly syrupy and 90′s-styled by a heavy-handed, wood-soaked guilty conscience. The kind of CC to “waste away the weekend with perfect regard for how cavalier we used to be.”  89  Tasted December 2013  @ChiantiClassico  @ProfileWineGrp

Priorat

The history: In Catalunya, northeast Spain. The most recent regulations of the DOQ were defined in 2006.

The lowdown: Dominated by hillside vineyards with poor soils, the dark slate called Licorella and low-fielding old vines. Garnacha and Carinena are the most planted, but also international varieties such as Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot and Syrah. Finest recent vintages include 2004, 2009 and 2012.

PLANETS DE PRIOR PONS 2009, Priorat, Spain, (314559, $24.95, WineAlign)

Clearly contemporary, voluptuous Garnacha blend, in symmetry with foil Carinena, In support are small amounts of Cabernet Sauvignon (10 per cent), Merlot (five) and Syrah (five). Chalk, grain and chocolate intensity, scents of dusty mulberry, menthol tobacco, eucalyptus and licorice. Works its international styling to great effect, if a bit heavy, woody and hollow up the middle. Lags just behind the stellar 2008 and yet this ’09 will have many a follower. Just a bit more structure would make it a prize.  89  Tasted December 2013

Rioja

The history: In northern Spain, on both sides of the River Ebro. The oldest Designation of Origin in Spain (DOCA), established in 1926.

The lowdown: Confluence of Atlantic and Mediterranean climates, with soils ranging from chalky-clay, to ferrous-clay and alluvial. Tempranillo is the most planted (red) grape. Finest recent vintages include 2005, 2005, 2010 and 2011.

ONTAÑÓN RESERVA 2004, Rioja, Spain (725895, $25.95, WineAlign)

The animal that is an ’04 Rioja Reserva is a VINTAGES darling. Here is yet another example in a long line-up spread out over several months of releases. 2004 palate fatigue should certainly have set in but for this youthful yet learned Ontañón. The dichotomy is not lost with much wood to be nosed though it’s neither abstruse nor resinous. More like a smoking cedar plank beneath the rendering weight of a slow-roasting porcine slab. Tangy cherry, sour plum and really stretched length. Mineral finish. Brillo Tempranillo with a touch of Graciano.  91  Tasted December 2013  @TandemSelection

Good to go!

The Wine Diaries: old world reds

Mario Laporta, AFP/Getty Images

Tasting through many wines in a short time requires focus. While it would not be considered stressful or difficult, the test is something I would wish for all my friends to try. Steadfast loyalty in regard of wine everywhere is my impetus behind these  ‘Old World’ tasting notes, that is, from Europe.

Related – More notes from the VINTAGES June 23, 2012 release

With each passing vintage, the line blurs between old and new world as modern techniques are employed by the most traditional of producers. Still we see the vintners from France, Italy, Spain, Portugal and Germany continuing to share a common sentiment. Great wine is made in the vineyard.

France

Domaine De Champ De Cour Moulin-à-Vent 2010 (430876, $17.95) plays more like a champ than the national footballers. Mommesin’s Beaujolais is dabbed with pretty smells, especially ripe cherries. Soft tosses junk but gets them dancing and swinging. What pure Gamay the varietal is all about.  88

Château Des Capucins 2009 (279992, $19.95) of Bordeaux’s Right Bank in Lalande de Pomerol is rigged with heavy Brettanomyces and wet, leathery sails. Strong, sturdy and inky like Syrah from the Languedoc. Jury is out on this one.  NR

Château Tronquoy-Lalande 2004 (279984, $29.95) offers a reasonable look at Left Bank St-Estephe nearly ten years on. Similar nosing characteristic like the Capucins at first but here it’s just a regular kind of funk. A boondoggle of fresh energy abounds, with earth and spice. Bordeaux forest for the leaves.  Lovely CVR** potential.  89

Château De Lancyre Coste D’aleyrac 2010 (74765, $19.95) opens distinctively Syrah in both violaceous aura and hue. Considered to be of the Languedoc, the tone and redolent cherry-red Grenache also speaks directly of Pic Saint Loup, the true, though not yet defined appellation. Could drink this all the time.  90

Château De Nages JT Costières de Nîmes 2009 (736876, $21.95) is mostly Syrah with a small percentage of Mourvèdre. A hillock covered in blueberries entices a mellow ascent but the nightshade is pulled over the palate by a capsicum stinger. Quality Southern Rhône that needs two years minimum to settle in.  89

Le Gravillas Sablet 2010 (78790, $14.95) does simple Côtes-du-Rhône-Villages for the masses. Crystalized berries in every way. Dialed in.  86

Château Vincens Cuvée Prestige 2009 (272427, $14.95) from Malbec’s home of Cahors remains true to the region’s ‘black’ wine effect. Then a blueberry molasses modern take plays havoc on extraction’s oldest trick in the book. A huge thwack of tannin grips from behind. A suspendable offence by such an inexpensive Malbec.  85

Germany

Schloss Reinhartshausen Dry Pinot Noir 2007 (40543, $15.95) always intrigues and only Rheingau Pinot noses like this. Mild mushroom meets blanched almond. Surprising verve in balance and length.  87

Italy

Umberto Cesari Sangiovese Di Romagna Riserva 2008 (33399, $18.95) from Emilia-Romagna in Northern Italy is meaty, musty and frankly smells like “un pezzo di merda.” Like Oeste’s Pêra Rocha dropped from the tree and ready for baby sauce.  Or the near disastrous effort of Sunday’s national Football team.  84

Fontalpino Chianti Classico 2009 (275859, $22.95) barks more black dog and caws less crow in opposition to the mascot on the appellation’s logo. Heavy metal packaging and tenebrous complexion, “with eyes that shine burnin’ red.” A Zeppelin of heavy lead on the edge of Sangiovese’s limits. More IGT than Chianti really and sensory overload of deliciousness if you like the modern style.  89

Lamole Di Lamole Vignetto Campolungo Chianti Classico Riserva 2007 (231241, $36.95) blows past the 27 month ageing requirement for CC Riserva and thankfully so. The massive fruit and tannin interchange needs the oak. This CCR ventures up around the bend and all over the map. “You can ponder perpetual motion” like this Campolungo, moving backwards and forwards. Bold and beautiful, the Lamole is complex and bloody coagulating Sangiovese.  90

Le Sughere Di Frassinello 2009 (25700, $29.95) the modish Sangioveto dominated blend from Tuscany’s coastal Maremma is an encrusted, purgative Etruscan. Saucy, sugary pomegranate, crushed tomato concentrate and acidic ossein.  90

Lionello Marchesi Coldisole Brunello Di Montalcino 2006 (281238, $41.95) seems muffled, not unlike this house’s very good ’97 seemed in 2003. Currently medium in body with an oil slick of resinous fruit working towards a bright future.  89

Mastrojanni San Pio 2008 (944603, $30.95) is a not so common Cabernet-based Montalcino blend with 20% local Brunello grapes to keep it real. There is a citrus drive and berry spice but really nothing specifically Tuscan about it. The taxi is speeding through the piazza but the wheels are in neutral.  87

Le Ragose Ripasso Valpolicella Classico Superiore 2007 (991984, $18.95) quite convincingly sticks Veneto at the centre of a bulls-eye. Nuts and chocolate Ragusa nougat, ox suet and potpurri polish.  87

Monte Zovo Sa’Solin Ripasso Valpoliccella 2009 (650713, $17.95) begins with Brett, airs out and then simplifies for red sauce pasta. Misses the mineral boat of Le Ragose.  85

Lebanon

Cave Kouroum Petit Noir 2007 (260141, $14.95) from the Bekaa Valley intimates Pinot Noir in a Kiwi sort of way. Soft, easy going, “mafi mushkilato be charmed by its flavours.  86

Musar Jeune 2009 (178079, $17.95) from the esteemed producer and their entry-level juice. Unfortunately a corked bottle.  NR

Portugal

Quinta Do Quetzal Reserva 2007 (277376, $27.95) out of Alentejo will, I’m hoping, take it on the cheek or chin when “faced with a dodo’s conundrum.” That I might consider this blind to be an Australian Shiraz/Cabernet blend or South African Pinotage means the fake Chinese rubber plant quotient in uncommonly high. Botox treated plastica of the head and from knee to ankle.  86

Sogrape Reserva Douro 2008 (335208, $17.95) works Portugal’s most famous locale with clean, crisp, modern drive. The vanilla oak is obvious along with cedar mulch and savoury, floral scents. Medium heft, solid, continental and conventional.  87

Spain

Barón de Magaña 2007 (280552, $17.95) was corked.

Bodegas Olarra Cerro Añon Gran Reserva 2004 (190827, $24.95) made of 80% Tempranillo with smatterings of Garnacha, Mazuelo and Graciano. Regnant for today’s Rioja movement. An ampelographer might be required to place the Millerized Olarra but no matter. This Gran Reserva is to Rioja what resolved, mellifluent Chianti Classico Reserva is to Tuscany. Easy on the eyes, nose, mouth and throat.  88

Langa Tradicion Centenaria Garnacha 2008 (194795, $13.95) is a repeat performance. Like the 2007 from Calatayud, the two Garnachas act out a simple, sugary and leavened oak fruit play to a standing “O.”  86

Ramón Bilbao Reserva 2005 (281097, $17.00)  does Rioja with IVR* spirit. Hewn, leathery texture and a perfume river of aromatics leading to a petal strewn pagoda’s steps. Musk of melon and ox lingers on the lawn. Subtle and captivating.  88

Torres Gran Segre De Toro Reserva 2008 (315648, $15.95) of Catalunya is a hircine of horse’s hooves. Mocha java oaks its way into the stable of Garnacha, Carignan and Syrah.  86

Tossals Junior 2006 (278135, $18.95) emblematizes the new Montsant. One third Carinena is grippy and laborious to chew through at present. A second third lavender and raspberry Garnacha are more welcoming but it’s the last third that does the real wooing. Cabernet Sauvignon on loan from Bordeaux joins near-sectarian Tempranillo to win over fans. Soporific and yet the blend is a tough nut to crack.  87

IVR* – Vintage Direct Intrigue-to-Value Ratio

CVR** – Vintage Direct Curiosity-to-Value Ratio

Good to go!

Tasting through Portugal and the VINTAGES May 26th Release

Portuguese Corks

Three thematic release posts done, canada.com1, canada.com2, canada.com3, 16 more tasting notes to go. Shout out to Anne Yarymowich and Annick Le Goaix for some splendid Portuguese gastronomy last week at the AGO’s Wines of Portugal tasting. Read it at canada.com.

Anne Yarymovich. Credit: Dany Le Goaix

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Quinta do Infantado Red 2009 (95158, $21.95) was the best Portuguese wine I tasted. João Roseira uses no yeasts, no additives, just grapes fermenting and developing by themselves. This is wine truly made in the vineyard. Balance in every facet. Smokey, meaty and fat for a three Tinto Douro, the Infantado offers up the greatest of simple pleasures.  89

Wines of Portugal Tasting. Credit: Dany Le Goaix

Lingenfelder Freinsheimer Musikantelbuckel Riesling Kabinett 2010 (87593, $17.95) wins the award for longest label. Ciders with pretty, apple effervescence and Vidal-esque hairspray viscosity but ultimately buckles under its own weight. Sad to see it leaving sa-soon.  85

Atlas Peak Cabernet Sauvignon 2006 (229856, $99.95) would have been a beastly treat if it were not corked.  NR

Ridge Monte Bello 2009 (711085, $145.95) is a wow wine. Deep, deep purple. Thick, oily extract of red bark and sugary berries baked in a pie. Offers crazy love and goes the full monte. “I can hear her heartbeat for a thousand miles.” Strikes fear and loathing in Wineontarians in need of a price kvetch. Get over it. Good wine is expensive. Ciao Bello!  93

Rubicon Estate Cask Cabernet Sauvignon 2008 (29553, $74,95) dry rubs its sweetheart of the rodeo nose with brown sugar, thyme, sage, molido, ancho and fleur de sel. There are more ingredients but if we revealed them we’d have to kill you. Country Rock Cabernet. You don’t miss your water when killing this. This Cask cries out for flesh.  90

Chateau Smith Cabernet Sauvignon 2009 (280107, $24.95) the creamy vanilla shaken, not stirred Cab. Good structure and backbone if not a whole lotta linear, skyscraping action.  87

Urraca Cabernet Sauvignion 2008 (271080, $19.95) of Agrelo identifies with Provence. Mired in the weeds of dill, borage and thistle. Further herbal notes of tarragon along with olives and tobacco. So much savoury.  85

Barossa Valley Estate Ebenezer Shiraz 2006 (971705, $39.95) is bold, beefy and blasted from blown speakers. The new pornography in Aussie Shiraz, impressive for its place and will show some balance 10 years on. Certainly no Scrooge and generous with matters of fruit and heart. “A lot of oyster but no pearls.” Will get you through a long December.  92

Tait The Ball Buster Red 2009 (269472, $24.95) is a bitch. Tart and flavoured by sun-kissed berries, jawbreaker and gobstopper. Dense and concentrated, “stone cold sober as a matter of fact.”  88

Astrolabe Voyage Pinot Noir 2009 (179200, $24.95) trips the tongue, grips the mouth and sends them spiralling into space. Expressive of vanilla and baking spices. Big tannins for Marlborough Pinot. Needs a little spirit of the west and to “go home for a rest.”  86

Sequillo Cellars Red 2009 (277996, $29.95) ankles along a rocky Swartland road. Hard lines make this ambitious South African seem Mourvedre dominated.  86

Momessin Les Griottes Morgon 2010 (276402, $17.95) casts a lovely opaque, red lollipop hue. Bitter tar, griottes and sherry join red apple in this darling Gamay. “Let there be sunlight, let there be rain,” drink this Beaujolais off and on again.  87

Chateau Pipeau 2008 (138131, $29.00) always offers great Bordeaux value but this bottle is flawed. Smells like merde NR

Di Majo Norante Ramitello 2009 (973214, $15.95) steps right up to the IVR* plate and antes up mezzogiorno shun with liturgical love. Sun melted licorice and grilling scents meet juicy acidity, finesse and restrained power. Molto bene89

Coto De Imaz Gran Reserva 2001 (976811, $29.95) is highly concentrated for Rioja, especially at 11 years old. Tempting leafy aromas as of tobacco and tumbling like a Billy Tallent riff.  Or is that just my Imaz-ination, “running away with me.”  88

Delas Frères Saint Esprit Côtes Du Rhône Rosé 2011 (224964, $12.95) offers up strawberry, rhubarb and cream with a savoury accent. Subtle pale, pink, see-through hue and warming humidity. Great value here. Rosie you’re all right. “Looks like it’s me and you again tonight.”  88

Good to go!

IVR* – Vintage Direct Intrigue-To-Value Ratio

CVR** – Vintage Direct Curiosity-To-Value Ratio

VINTAGES February 18th Release, Wines Tasted

13th STREET OLD VINES RIESLING 2010 (272617, $23.95) carries on in the tradition of the house style. Eerily similar to the Palette, reeking of Viognier and Gewurztraminer. It’s round, easy to like, if negligent of grip.  85

DOMANE WACHAU TERRASSEN FEDERSPIEL GRÜNER VELTLINER 2010 (31534, $17.95) shows a playful, youthful exuberance. Simple broth here, properly seasoned and will work well as a base when combined with more mosaic ingredients. Adds touches of water spinach, mossy root vegetable and a faint hint of sweet pepper.  87

TOWNSHIP 7 SYRAH 2007 (263665, $24.95) gives off a stickum smell so much so VA comes to mind. Hard and brutish, the township ungroomed, full of moody character, barely penetrable. Hold a feather over the glass to see if it’s alive. Hard to assess.  85

CLOS DU VAL ZINFANDEL 2009 (590216, $23.95) though muted, noses mezzogiorno Primitivo so I question its origin. Primitive for Napa Valley Zinfandel, the CdV is silver-tongued and toothsome.  86

KENDALL-JACKSON VINTNER’S RESERVE CABERNET SAUVIGNON 2009 (331603, $22.95) simplifies Sonoma CS. Compartmentalized by its oak; cocoa dust, black cherry and empletre olive. Cherry pie recipe for plain sailing consumption.  85 

CHAMPY SIGNATURE PINOT NOIR BOURGOGNE 2009 (1149, $20.95) is palatable if unrecognizable as French Pinot. Nothing wrong with it aside from its ambiguity. Sweet, tart, savoury, floral and smokey but could easily be Niagara, Oregon or NZ.  86

DONNAFUGATA TANCREDI CONTESSA ENTELLINA 2007 (990424, $25.95) is housed by a hard to crack tough shell. Puckers the mouth with a caramelized, ozbek orange Sicilian sun-kiss. Scented by eucalyptus, wild strawberry and corbezzolo87

CASTELGIOCONDO BRUNELLO DI MONTALCINO 2006 (35295, 375 mL, $26.95) is made impassable by a mountain of oak but breaking off bits of chocolate will open it up to the world. Mouthfilling for sure and Paulliac-like with cedar, cigar box and coffee. Potentially great.  90

ALLEGRINI PALAZZO DELLA TORRE 2008 (672931, $24.95) the ‘Customer Favourite’ and WS (90 and #60, Top 100, 2011) is indeed a gritty performer, raging bull, Chianina nero. Flavours of vanilla, root beer, chocolate syrup, whipped cream and Maraschino cherry. “Drink your big black cow and get out of here.” Points for staying power. Will drink well in five to seven.  89

MASI BROLO DI CAMPOFIORIN 2007 (976092, $24.95) also a ‘Customer Favourite’ and another Tybalt, dark lord, villainous. Rich, concentrated, black almandine, bruising yet freshly acidic.  88

BODEGAS LAN CRIANZA 2007 (166538, $15.95) noses low tones of game, bitter herbs and dried roses but wears it well. Colli Senesi comes to mind. Traditional Rioja here, pueblo issue, arid, yet pretty. “A little old fashioned but that’s all right.86

 

Good to go!