Get back to Greece

Black Corinthian Raisin in early stages of veraison #manyshadesofachaia #prettyinpeloponnese

Over the past few weeks I have been getting reacquainted with some close friends. The wines of Greece. Greek wine and Godello have spent some quality time together, both at home and abroad. While in Paris last November I paid a visit to Gare au Gorille, a bistro in the Batignolles district of the 17th Arrondissement in Paris. A small but quintessential tasting was taking place; Thymiopoulos, Hatzidakis, Tetramythos and Sklavos. The tasting was a traveling extension from Oenos, a collaboration between winemakers Apostolos Thymiopoulos, Haridimos Hatzidakis, Evriviadis Sklavos and the wine trader Georgios Ioanndis.

#volcanic in Paris with #hatzidakis @DrinkGreekWine @3050imports Try it November 22nd in Toronto with @johnszaboms #aidani #assyrtiko #haridimoshatzidakis #mylos #santorini

Related – Getting into Greece

Gare au Gorille is a fine French paradoxical pun (“be careful of the gorilla) and also the title of a 1952 song by French musician Georges Brassens.  At the Paris tasting I rubbed shoulders with Greek gods, got salty with volcanic Santorini and travelled vicariously to Lixouri through endemic varietals and whimsical blends.

I highly recommend re-habituating with the new wines of Greece (which are actually the old ones) on a regular basis. The practice will take you from assyrtiko to retsina, debina to moschofilero and agiorgitiko to xinomavro. It will also transport you to places; Amyndeon to Zitsa, Nemea to Thessaloniki, Naoussa to Santorini. I’ve said it before. Greek wine is paradoxically diverse, mythically complex and critical to experiential wine blessedness.

The Greek paradox of producing great wines without anyone really knowing anything about them brings me to Zeno’s paradox of place. It was Eudemus and Alexander of Aphrodisias who bore witness and affirmation for the reconstruction of Zeno’s philosophical premise. The infinite regression goes like this: “Everything is somewhere: so places are in a place, which is in turn in a place, etc. The limitless exercise never allows you to get grounded so you end up nowhere. It was Aristotle who provided the solution. You always have to be somewhere. After all, being deprived of the possibility of saying where something is just leads to emptiness.

Red, white, rock and @DrinkGreekWine roll. Getting into old #winesofgreece with new regard.

Related – Till I reach Achaia ground

Greek wines offer a sense of being somewhere, all of them, but the challenge facing the Greek wine industry is securely fastened “in a place somewhere between the relic glow of early period brilliance and the cusp of legacy defining, career opus penning compositions. Making wine from endemic or indigenous grapes is a calling to a higher love, in spite of harsh conditions, geographical difficulties and the relative channels of global obscurity.”

The Greek dichotomy paradox leads me to the joke. A mathematician, a physicist and an engineer are asked to give an answer to the following question. One Greek vineyard is planted to endemic varietals and another to international ones. The grapes from one are brought to blend with those of the other. At which point will the ferments from the two vineyards strike a balance? The mathematician said they would never actually meet because the series is infinite. The physicist said they would meet when time equals infinity. The engineer said that within one more harvest they would be close enough for all practical purposes. The same might be said for Greek wines brought to a Toronto tasting and the locals coming to taste them.

Related – A new Greek morning

We tasted those wines at the WineAlign office, at the Royal Ontario Museum and at The LCBO’s Summerhill location with Christopher Sealy and Victory Wines and Spirits. Recurring themes and new finds were acquiesced. The wine-producing regions of Santorini (Aegean), Thessaloniki/Naoussa (Macedonia) and Nemea (Peloponnese) continue their inroads on the global scene. I noted that Achaia and Patras in the northern Peloponnese are on the verge of breaking out. The same is and will soon be said for Halkidiki, Mantinia, Zitsa, Evia, Kitherona, Imathia, Leprini, Attica, Crete, and Arkadia.

@DrinkGreekWine NOW! With @johnszabo in the RBC Glass Room #winesofgreece #EDOAO

We know by instinct that wines cast the shadow of their own destruction before them and are designed from the first with an eye to their later existence as ruins. Could this be more appropriate than when discussing the ancient and the new brought together in the wines of Greece? Unlike anywhere else Greek wines just seem to carry in their DNA a rusticity, a wisdom and a sense of age just as they are born, but they also last, linger and age longer than most anyone expects. They are to a generalization, the most especial set of regional wines in the world. To read his report that asks to drop the aristocratic pretence, please travel over to WineAlign.

Related – Wines of the People, Wines of the Place, by John Szabo, MS.

These following 53 tasting notes are all from May, a month that may as well have been dedicated to the wines of Greece. With thanks as always to Sofia Perpera, Twitter: @DrinkGreekWine, Instagram: winesofgreece and Facebook: @newwinesofgreece. I’ve four words for you babes. Get back to Greece.

2017 #winesofgreece @ROMToronto tasting highlights @DrinkGreekWine

Sparkling

Zoinos Zitsa Semi Sparkling 2016, PDO Zitsa (WineAlign)

Sparkling debina or halfway thereof is not exactly household in name for Ontario but the mountainous, high elevation locale of Epirus is a place for which, where and why sparkling wine makes sense. Grapes of high acidity come from out of a cool, windy, snow, sleet and rain kind of place. From a cooperative with maximum 11 per cent alcohol and a short time on lees, this is loaded with terpenes and dried (very gardenia) flowers The medicinal tonic is complimented by a pinch of sugar (that makes it go down) and go down with elegant ease. The lime finish is something to which you are welcome to attach a “like” emoji. Greek discovery number one. Approximately $20. Drink 2017-2018.  Tasted May 2017  @zoinoswinery  #ZoinosWinery  @zoinoswinerysa

Kir Yianni Akakies Xinomavro Sparkling Rosé 2015, Ac Macedonia, Greece (482646, $18.95, WineAlign)

The most interesting triad of xinomavro, Amyndeon and sparkling comes through in this toasty, flinty and rusty sweet Akakies. Rosé of strawberry, raspberry, currants and mountain tea. Chill it really well and pour it at a summer reception in the sun. With Dolmades! Drink 2017-2019.  Tasted April 2017  @kiryianni  @KolonakiGroup  kiryianni  @KirYianni  @KolonakiGroup

Rosé

Lykos Winery Rosé Grenache Rouge 2016, Pgi Evia, Greece (AgentWineAlign)

The Lykos Rosé is a grenache rouge play with some merlot and is dealt the wisdom afforded by 40 year-old vines on the south part of the island. Clay soil sits overtop limestone and the aromatics borrow this straight away, at first saline and then into Rosé richness. Texture comes with a sweet and sour palate. These vines gift low yields at four tonnes per hectare and its wine follows a similar to malagousia citrus line. Quite distinct. Drink 2017-2018.  Tasted March 2017  @LYKOSWINERY  lykounanalykoswineryevia  @LykosWinery

Troupis TOMH Rosé 2016, IGP Arcadia, Peloponnese, Greece (Agent, $18.95, WineAlign)

I tasted this magical, single-vineyard moschofilero blush on two consecutive days and each time it gave me epiphany shivers. There are few Ontario market specimens of Rosé made from a white wine grape with only minor skin contact, let’s say six to 10 hours and 24 hours maceration, which is remarkable since it is usually red wine that turns water into Rosé. But moschofilero carries pigmentation and is light-skinned so it’s best of both worlds suitable, like a perfect cross between pinot gris and for the sake of argument, pinot noir. First thought says it’s akin to a vin gris style and better off for it, celebrating a mountain terroir and allowing natural acidity to dictate the ideal. This TOMH (which may as well be an acronym for Troupis owed Moschofilero hero) helps to coax out the mineral and smells like the salinity and stone in a cave. I don’t find it overly fruity in terms of aromatics, even stoic and of high level acidity. There is faint cranberry, pomegranate and currant notes mixed with mountain tea and again, such salinity. Some residual sugar comes apparent on the palate but it’s essentially dry. Damn if moschcofilero isn’t ideally suited to Rosé and this TOMH will age a bit. Drink 2017-2019.   Tasted May 2017  @TroupisWinery    @VictoryWine  troupiswinery  victorywineandspiritsinc  @troupis.winery  Victory Wine & Spirits Inc.  

Thymiopoulos Rosé de Xinomavro 2014, PGI Macedonia, Greece (Agent, $22.95, WineAlign)

Thymipoloupos fashions a wholly different sort of Rosé, using the thicker skinned and more direct xinomavro as the man, so a masculine blush this is, full of tang and at first, a medium-dry meets cordial intensity. So much strawberry comes across the tongue but with dusty savour and then the salinity kicks in to bite the sweetness. This is very long and not so many make Rosé like this. Even just a touch in the oxidative way. At the present time varietal, climate, geography and vintage directs the style but adjustments will be made along the way. The formula will refine and in turn reveal some singular Greek Rosé. Drink 2017-2018.  Tasted May 2017  @thymiopoulosvin  @VictoryWine  @winesofnaoussa  apostolosthymiopoulos  eletsi  victorywineandspiritsinc  Eleftheria Tsitsipa  Victory Wine & Spirits Inc.  @WinesofNaoussa

Whites

Assyrtiko

Lykos Winery Assyrtiko 2016, Pgi Kitherona, Greece (AgentWineAlign)

Assyrtiko thrives beyond Santorini, here in the diaspora locale of Kitherona, at 450m on the slopes near Thebes. The terroir is stony shale with good drainage and the usual mineral strike is fattened up a touch but also quite reductive and far from shedding the barrel. The 15 years old vines are now just coming into play and owning the grapes. After nine months it went into medium toast French (300L) oak barrels for four months, to broaden horizons in a whole new way of looking at assyrtiko. Such smoulder and leesy texture reminds of Melgaço’s Anselmo Mendes and his barrel-aged alvarinho. Plenty of lemon juices over the finish. Drink 2018-2021.  Tasted March 2017  @LYKOSWINERY  lykounanalykoswineryevia  @LykosWinery

Lyrarakis Vóila Assyrtiko 2016, Crete, Greece (Agent, $18.95, WineAlign)

Certainly Cretan but no cretan this assryrtiko from relatively high altitude (580m) at the eastern part of Crete is a light and slightly resinous white with plenty of herbs and nice varietal spice. The citrus dominates the palate but the finish retains to mountain tea and fish complimenting leaves. Nicely done, clean, modern and a good take on the grape. Drink 2017-2018.  Tasted May 2017  @lyrarakis  @MajesticWineInc  @winesofcrete  lyrarakiswines  majesticwinesinc  winesofcrete  @LyrarakisWines  @majesticwinecellars

Santo Wines Assrytiko Organic 2016, PDO Santorini, Greece (Agent, $20.00, WineAlign)

Assyrtiko as only it can be, from a place reborn of a massive volcanic thrush in phases, covering the island in a 60-70m layer of stony, rocky pumice. One of the fuller and more concentrated assyrtiko with fruit juicing in and out of the bleeding lava stone. Still a water starved expression as it has to be from its harsh growing climate, a thick-skinned, drought resistant and managed, naturally selected grape. All this portends to make this expression all that much more incredible, of salty, palpable extract, linear and yet magically delicious. Drink 2018-2021. Tasted May 2017  @santo_wines  @Santoriniwines  @KolonakiGroup  santo_wines  winesfromsantorini  kolonakigroup  @SantoWines  @WinefromSantorini

Domaine Sigalas Assyrtiko 2016, PDO Santorini, Greece (Agent, $22.95, WineAlign)

At Sigalas the eponymous estate σοδειά (annata, vintage, etc.) is assyrtiko, solo assyrtiko, in stainless steel, four months on lees and from 2016, a rich vintage. It’s actually a big vintage, a huge vintage for quantity and quality replete with a fineness from those lees which really compound the mineral butter of this assyrtiko. Like 2011 and more. While the specialized village-specific assyrtiko from Sigalas are each their own sort of exceptional snowflakes, it is this broad yet precise swath of volcanic Santorini that defines the producer and the place. There is no excuse for not drinking a bottle of this wine at least three times a year. Drink 2017-2022.  Tasted March 2017  @DomaineSigalas  @MajesticWineInc  domainesigalas  @DomaineSigalas  Panayiota Kalogeropoulou

Argyros Assyrtiko Estate 2015, PDO Santorini, Greece (Agent, $23.95, WineAlign)

It must first be noted that the fruit in this Argyros bottle comes from 150-plus year-old ungrafted vines in Episkopi on (and it can’t be overstated) volcanic and sandy soil. It’s 100 per cent assyrtiko raised in 80 per cent stainless steel and 20 French oak for six months. The tenacity of assyrtiko vines built up from lava soil and the steadfast grip mixed with some barrel cream puts this in a singular category for white wine. It never forgets from whence and where it came but it takes grippy, piercing and citrus-stone character to another next level. Not to knock previous vintages but in here there is great structure and the stainless to wood compendium puts it in an ionic to corinthian entablature. Low yields, assyrtiko, a volcano, architecture and impeccable balance bring this all together. Drink 2018-2025.  Tasted May 2017    @Santoriniwines  @KolonakiGroup  #argyrosestate  winesfromsantorini  kolonakigroup  @ArgyrosEstate  @WinefromSantorini  @KolonakiGroup

Gaia Wines Thalassitis Santorini 2016, PDO Santorini, Greece (315010, $32.95, WineAlign)

Thalassitis is Gaia’s original wine, first produced in 1994 and the onomatopoeia in the nomenclature is in ode to Homer. The poet referred to Gaia’s Nemea (in the Peloponnese) as Ampeloessa, meaning “full of vines.” The searing and intense endemic to Santorini assyrtiko also carries some impressive weight (on a 13 per cent alcohol frame) with repeated shots of lime and formidable black pumice grit. See ’tis the sound of thalassitis and assyrtiko which mimics its searing and volcanic calescent character. The words sound like the sea to repeat the rhetorical effect. Definitive assyrtiko so easy to swallow. Drink 2017-2022.  Tasted May 2017  @GaiaWines  @Smallwinemakers  @Santoriniwines  gaiawines  #smallwinemakerscollection  winesfromsantorini   @GaiaWinesGR  @smallwinemakerscollection  @WinefromSantorini

Domaine Sigalas Kavalieros 2015, PDO Santorini, Greece (Agent, SAQ 11814421, $31.00, WineAlign)

I’ve not yet tasted the Kavalieros 2014, so this single-vineyard, 18 months on lees done in stainless steel Kavalieros 2015 made by “Mr. George” is the benchmark for Santorini, assrytiko and salty white wines everywhere. The first release was 2009. Straight up and turning the world on its head, like the old man on the label and upside down against Apollo’s Aegean Cyclades. This ’15 richer still, more than the seven villages wines and a hyperbole as compared to the entry-level assyrtiko, of deeper mineral, compressed, layered and fantastic. Crushed rocks permeate in aggregate, it’s quixotically saline and textured, of intense presence and finally, structured. For 15 years at least. A late shot of natural Santorini tonic swirls in centrifuge with assyrtiko so wound up. This will need 10 years to unwind and allow for cracks to form in the mineral shell, followed by the birth of its fruit. It should never be forgotten that assyrtiko can and will show fruit but with Kavalieros you’ll have to be patient. Drink 2020-2031.  Tasted March 2017  @DomaineSigalas  @MajesticWineInc  domainesigalas  @DomaineSigalas  Panayiota Kalogeropoulou

Santo Wines Grande Reserve 2014, PDO Santorini, Greece (Agent, $40.95, WineAlign)

Santo’s Grand Reserve is a special assyrtiko in its own class. It shares an affinity with other volcanic whites of Santorini in that it comes from selected vines, many 100 years of age or more and it is that mineral-gifting, salty giving soil that speaks of place. But in the case of Santo’s GR we are talking about assyrtiko that spent 12 months in French barrels so the texture and flavour compounds are directed into crème frâiche, island garrigue and tea. The classic Santorini rock and stone is never abandoned or oppressed but the lactic-milky notes are quite present. The citrus too seems less electric, more compressed and the level of tang, whether from lava or by wood spice, is very prevalent. This reminds me of what happens when a winemaker like Anselmo Mendes adds a year of barrel aging to Alvarinho, though in this case the volcano always offers the balance to keep things honest and real. This will age for a long time. Drink 2018-2028.  Tasted May 2017  @santo_wines  @Santoriniwines  @KolonakiGroup  santo_wines  winesfromsantorini  kolonakigroup  @SantoWines  @WinefromSantorini

Domaine Sigalas Assyrtiko Single Village Collection Pyrgos 2016, PDO Santorini, Greece (AgentWineAlign)

This particular locale from the “7” collection is from Pyrgos Village, an assyrtiko on the lees for one year in stainless. The collection are drawn from the villages (all seven of them represented), 1000 bottles per village and only sold by the case. The first vintage of this seven strong is a direct into the micro-place investigation, into what separates one from the next, with a range of altitudes and harvest dates and brace yourself for the news. August 20th is the last one! This Pyrgos is rich and intensely mineral, of wow factor intensity, deeply round and rolling, swelling in waves of Aegean acidity. Fine-spun citrus, of lemon without description, like the sea, its creatures and their freshness, with a zest and a pierce of that lemon. Drink 2017-2024.  Tasted March 2017  @DomaineSigalas  @MajesticWineInc  domainesigalas  @DomaineSigalas  Panayiota Kalogeropoulou

Fascinations with @troupiswinery & @thymiopoulosvin and some Greek geology @DrinkGreekWine

Malagousia

Domaine Porto Carras Malagousia 2016, PGI Halkidiki, Greece (WineAlign)

From Greece’s largest organic vineyard on the western coasts of Sithonia their malagousia is emblematic of a varietal story, of a lost grape, revived in the 70s and 80s. It is here that easier ripening happens and the wines can reach 13.5-14.0 per cent alcohol but with a rich forest acting as a barrier to the sea, trapping cool air and protecting the vineyards from summer heat. Highly aromatic, anti-oxidative and dynamic, like peach potage in syrup, of orchard fruit, an oily palate and a portage of melted alloy sensation. It is both mineral and fat at the same time. Even a bit chewy. Needs a big chill. Drink 2017-2019. Tasted May 2017  @PortoCarrasWine  Domaine Porto Carras  @DomainePortoCarras

Lykos Winery Malagousia 2016, Pgi Evia, Greece (WineAlign)

Lykos Winery was started in 1989, twenty years after Apostolos Lykos’ grandfather had already been using athiri and savatiano for his restaurant, which at the time had 17 seats but has since grown to 1000. Here malagousia explodes with aromatica, it’s rich and viscous with thanks to the island’s southern portion at Halkida. From a climate affected by two seas, so it’s both herbal and fuelled by lemon preserve, so Greek yes but so specific to this place. The acidity has terrific temper, tang and the wet, soft metal is felt. Vineyards at 200m are a mere 12 years-old. Just wait. Drink 2017-2019. Tasted March 2017  @LYKOSWINERY   lykounanalykoswineryevia  @LykosWinery

Y’all should think about pouring this @DrinkGreekWine #malagousia #bytheglass #megaspileo #cavino #achaia #peloponnese #Prowein #prowein2017

Domain Mega Spileo Malagousia 2016, PGI Achaia, Peloponnese, Greece (Agent, WineAlign)

The domain with the awe-inspiring, breathtaking vineyards set in a bowl below the medieval monastery has fashioned a malagousia worthy of Achaia and no restaurant list should discount how much pleasure it can bring. White wine rarely gives away so freely of salty, sweet and tart fruit juice, as if this Mega Spileo was juiced straight from the peach, plum, lemon and lime trees. There are no frivolous bells and whistles here, only natural free run juice within the context of how the varietal is expressed in Achaia. Northern Peloponnese cool altitude character right here. Drink 2017-2019.  Tasted March 2017    @apostolosGW  #MegaSpileo  Apostolos Gerakinis

Domaine Tetramythos Malagousia 2016, PGI Achaia, Peloponnese, Greece (SAQ 12910335, $17.95, WineAlign)

Malagousia from Achaia brings the goods and again magnified by the vintage a level of this specific juicy richness. This was fermented in higher temperatures to avoid 2015’s problematic alcoholic fermentation. As a result the impressed and increased humidity translates to the faux-botrytis, peachy sauvignon blanc thing and then the acidity and citrus just take over,. The palate is pure classic malagousia, possessive of great low pH and high natural acidity. This 2016 is crispy but more aromatic than usual. Drink 2017-2021.  Tasted March 2017  @Tetramythos  #tetramythoswines  @tetramythoswines  Devon Masciangelo

Taverna Toxotis, Düsseldorf

Moschofilero

Semeli Feast Moschofilero 2014, Peloponnese, Greece (477562, $12.95, WineAlign)

The hang time and extraction seem for one, delayed and two, pressed for success. There is a decidedly ripe yet slightly oxidative note on this moschofilero from the Peloponnese, a hint of banana and another one that m makes one think of guava. The palate brings a coiffed citrus and plenty of sour tang. Served warm this will not thrill but with obvert chill and grilled fish it will do just fine. Drink 2017.  Tasted May 2017  @SemeliWines     #semeliwines  #artisanalwineimports  @SemeliWines  @artisanalwineimports

Boutari Moschofilero 2016, Mantinia, Greece (172387, $13.25, WineAlign)

If heights have anything to do with adding some favour and complexity into the success of moschofilero than the 650m of clay soils for Boutari’s bottling launch from a good place. Altitude does in fact bring some extra added texture and it is the palate that wins big. Classic yellow stone fruit, citrus and glade are part of the aromatic profile. The mouthfeel is nicely delicate and then you get the wooly, fuzzy and mouth coating feel. Finishes quick but for the price, as expected. Drink 2017-2018.  Tasted May 2017  @boutari  @KolonakiGroup  boutariwines  kolonakigroup  @boutariwines  @KolonakiGroup

Tasting day @winealign

Skouras Moschofilero 2016, PGI Peloponnese, Greece (442178, $15.25, WineAlign)

The Skouras Moschofilero is grown at 700-750m up on the cool locale of the Mantinia Plateau. The depth in colour of the skins can turn out a hue not unlike pinot gris or gewürztraminer and the skins’ texture makes contact so very doable. A hint of though well short of the idea is the approach here, highly aromatic but also lactic. Rosewater and rose petal on the terpenic nose are joined by seminal acidity. The palate adds lemon, lime and grapefruit though stays south of the bitter pith agency. Quite clean, reductive even, of a stainless stylistic and cool. Finishes with lemon polish, certainly a lighter version of dry gewürztraminer but also connected to riesling and the aforementioned pinot gris. A chameleon and very versatile. Drink 2017-2018.  Tasted May 2017 @DOMAINESKOURAS  @KolonakiGroup  skourasdomaine  @KolonakiGroup  @domaineskouras

Troupis Fteri Moschofilero 2016, IGP Arcadia, Peloponnese, Greece (392936, $16.95, WineAlign)

Fteri from Yiannis Troupis is more than just a matter of the rich extract bringing the classic faux sugary aromatics, of sugar pears and moschcofilero’s wild scent. It’s also a spring feeling, of unfurling fiddleheads and their herbal-vegetal, early spring freshness before turning into a pungent fern (Fteri). Such a refreshing white with a two month quick dance in the barrel. Terrific quality from altitude that pushes some salivating acidity thanks to the elevation and all in all over delivers quality at the next step up from entry level. Drink 2017-2019.  Tasted May 2017  @TroupisWinery  @VictoryWine  troupiswinery  victorywineandspiritsinc  @troupis.winery  Victory Wine & Spirits Inc.  

Troupis Moschofilero 2016, PDO Mantinia, Greece (463422, $18.95, WineAlign)

Fteri from Yiannis Troupis is more than just a matter of the rich extract bringing the classic faux sugary aromatics, of sugar pears and moschcofilero’s wild scent. It’s also a spring feeling, of unfurling fiddleheads and their herbal-vegetal, early spring freshness before turning into a pungent fern (Fteri). Such a refreshing white with a two month quick dance in the barrel. Terrific quality from altitude that pushes some salivating acidity thanks to the elevation and all in all over delivers quality at the next step up from entry level. Drink 2017-2019.  Tasted May 2017  @TroupisWinery  @VictoryWine  troupiswinery  victorywineandspiritsinc  @troupis.winery  Victory Wine & Spirits Inc.  

Muscat

Domaine Tetramythos Muscat Sec Blanc Nature 2016, PGI Peloponnese, Greece (AgentWineAlign)

If you want to learn anything about breaking through boundaries, magical realism and the pragmatic confidence of a winemaker like Panayiotis Papagiannopoulos than this is the wine for you. Muscat de (extreme) petit grains’ higher level of protein gives it the ability to stabilize earlier, yet don’t think this is a wine without risk or complexity, which is why so many others should use it and make it this way. Great natural acidity again, as always with this producer, pure essence of lemon and what lemon will bring. Like 2014 that acidity and the dry extract are in this vacuum, so this just sucks the moisture from the mouth. Please be patient and wait for the great tart lemon of this Muscat dpg which means “something great” to speak to you. Oh would I like to see this grape and this style done in Ontario. Dry extract and tannin at its white wine finest. Drink 2017-2021.  Tasted March 2017  @Tetramythos  #tetramythoswines  @tetramythoswines  Devon Masciangelo

The inimitable @tetramythos @DrinkGreekWine of Panayiotis Papagiannopoulos @Prowein #naturalacidity #roditis #retsina #muscat #blancnature #malagousia #Prowein #prowein2017

Roditis

Domaine Tetramythos Roditis 2016, PDO Patras, Greece (Agent, $14.95, WineAlign)

The roditis 2016 is a product of a sluggish fermentation, of almost 100 days, plus malolactic that began half way through. As a result it mixes lemon blossom with mineral and goes more unctuous than some other vintages. The complexity and structure are high on the Tetramythos scale. This is the organic bottling, as opposed to the PGI Peloponnese natural. Drink 2017-2020.  Tasted March 2017  @Tetramythos  #tetramythoswines  @tetramythoswines  Devon Masciangelo

Domaine Tetramythos Roditis 2015, PGI Peloponnese, Greece (Agent, $17.95, WineAlign)

Roditis 2015 is the natural one, racked from the top and finally now settled (so at this time of tasting 2016 is not yet in bottle but at this time of writing should already be as it always does in April). This is the cleanest and purest of the natural wines on the planet, low in pH, high of natural acidity and without a care in the world. With nothing to fear in regards to spoilage it can go on its own personal shopping spree, accumulate character, personality and confidence with the end result being that there is more of everything in the natural one. It’s terrifically repeatable, replicable and clonal acidity makes it quite trippy, stepping on and igniting the light fantastic’s wire. You just have to take a stab in the dark with winemaker Panayiotis Papagiannopoulos’ roditis. Or ye have not yet lived. Drink 2017-2021.  Tasted March 2017  @Tetramythos  #tetramythoswines  @tetramythoswines  Devon Masciangelo

Domaine Tetramythos Retsina 2016, PGI Achaia, Peloponnese, Greece (AgentWineAlign)

The Tetramythos Retsina is made from roditis but can’t be labeled as such, why, because of perfectionist interests and bureaucracy. This is most certainly not the roditis you know, or think you know. This emerges unscathed and in a happy place from out of a natural fermentation and then amphora raised. The cognitive absence of resin and evergreen over-attention is replaced by a conifer funk and a thyme-rosemary herbal meld, but it’s all so faint and subtle. Lots of lemon and even some orange notes are part of the aromatic mix. The texture transfer is seamless and all is calm, a reflection of the maker and the gracious proprietors. Drink 2017-2021.  Tasted March 2017  @Tetramythos  #tetramythoswines  @tetramythoswines  Devon Masciangelo

Savatiano

Papagiannakos Savatiano Vieilles Vignes 2016, Attica, Greece (Agent, $17.65, WineAlign)

From Attica the old vines do elevate savatiano to a fine level, above and beyond the pale and the ecru. Bottled exactly a year ago I am glad this has had time for the deep citrus and acidity to mellow a touch, leaving this in a perfect drinking window right now. This is more aromatic than you might think, of lime juice, fresh thai basil and the inside of a beeswax-lined concrete tank. I find this quite complex in those terms and then fine if light on the palate. Must be from a tight and cloudy ferment, locked in and wrapped with great protection in its environment, like in a womb, with some semillon-esque, waxy character, gassy and aerified I can see this developing some honey post green figs and lime though it is broader on the palate with some honey dew adding to the green fig. Really needs grilled fish and a good chill. Drink 2017-2021.  Tasted May 2017  @vpapagiannakos  @MajesticWineInc  papagiannakos  majesticwinesinc  Papagiannakos Wines  @majesticwinecellars

Vidiano

Karavitakis Winery Klima Vidiano 2015, Crete, Greece (Agent, $23.00, WineAlign)

Klima, Greek for climate but also grapevine. Vidiano, indigenous to Crete, Chania to be specific, the Venetian Harbour, on the north coast. What the varietal brings (as opposed to let’s say to assyrtiko) is a tropical aroma profile and a fruitiness that the mineral one does not normally do. The peach-apricot-nectarine thing is almost like pinot gris but this is Greece so don’t be fooled. Rocks, stones and ancient script can’t help but define the line and the architecture of the wine. There is firm grip on the palate and because it grabs hold and holds on, this lingers for quite some time. I really like that length. Drink 2017-2020.  Tasted May 2017  @karavitakiswine  @VictoryWine  #karavitakiswinery  victorywineandspiritsinc Nikos Karavitakis  Victory Wine & Spirits Inc.

Pop goes the world. Tasting #popart #evia with Dimitrios @LykosWinery #prowein2017

White Blends

Lykos Winery Pop Art White 2016, Pgi Evia, Greece (AgentWineAlign)

Pop Art White combines the round and ripe ideals of athiri with aromatic malagousia and at 12 per cent alcohol is light, bright and yet has some weight to it. As much lime as lemon (so it must be the athiri that gives the lime), so easy and consumable (though I am actually quite partial it the sister red) but this represents terrific value for straight up grilled fish. Drink 2017-2019.  Tasted March 2017  @LYKOSWINERY  lykounanalykoswineryevia  @LykosWinery

Seméli Oreinos Helios White 2016, PGI Peloponnese, Greece (477554, $16.95, WineAlign)

The increasingly complimentary bedfellows of moschofilero and sauvignon blanc get together in this Seméli white for aromatic genius, faux botrytis heaven and dry extract success. Though this dries out with its unusually formidable grape tannin there is a linger of citrus and peach juicy elastic plasticity that is just great. Wonderful and playful Peloponnese value. Drink 2017-2019.  Tasted May 2017  @SemeliWines     #semeliwines  #artisanalwineimports  @SemeliWines  @artisanalwineimports

 

Domaine Sigalas Assyrtiko Athiri 2016, Santorini, Greece (Agent, $19.90, WineAlign)

The double A is an assyrtiko (75 per cent) and athiri blend, the latter helping to gift access for earlier drinking. Never wavers from its aromatic roots and necessity. Citrus bitters are prevalent but in the lithest way and only really in design to draw it all together. So drinkable but does not forget that its primary responsibility is tethered to an assyrtiko injunction. For people who don’t quite understand the mineral way or the highway. Drink 2017-2019.  Tasted May 2017  @DomaineSigalas  @MajesticWineInc  domainesigalas  @DomaineSigalas  Panayiota Kalogeropoulou

Wine Art Techni Alipias White 2016, Drama, Greece (Agent, $20.95, WineAlign)

Techni Alipias is primarily sauvignon blanc (80 per cent) mixed with assyrtiko and the nomenclature tells us this wine speaks to the art of “helping people forget their sorrows.” The vines are found near Mt. Pangeon, a Dionysian cult locale now in the land of Drama. The drama in this blend is subtle, the aromas all about citrus and the texture quite a mouthful to contend with. A highly distracting wine so if you are having a bad day this will do the trick with its tragicomedy mix of tart fruit and round acidity. Drink it with fried little fishes and calamari. Drink 2017-2018.  Tasted May 2017  @wineartestate  @KolonakiGroup  wine_art_estate  kolonakigroup  @wine.artestate  @KolonakiGroup

Reds

Agiorgitiko

Domaine Vassiliou Agiorgitiko 2008, PDO Nemea, Greece (WineAlign)

Vassilou’s Nemea agiorgitiko delves even deeper into the fig, raisin and old wood, comparable to an old school reserva tempranillo stylistic. It’s certainly got a musty note in a cool, sheltered from the storm, inside a cave stalactite and stalagmite way. Burnt orange is the dominant flavour in what is ostensibly and seriously rustic stuff. The fruit dries out with leafy compost yet structure and therefore age ability is king. Drink 2017-2020.  Tasted May 2017  @VassiliouNemeio  #domainevassiliou  Domaine Vassiliou – Nemeion Estate / Κτήμα Βασιλείου – Κτήμα Νέμειον

Lykos Winery Kratistos 2013, Pdo Nemea, Greece (Agent, $18.95, WineAlign)

Kratistos PDO Nemea 2013 is 100 per cent agiorgitiko and one of the first wines produced by Apostolos and Athena (Nana) Lykou. As per the marriage of varietal and place it takes a statist approach, with rusty and developed fruit, of strawberry, raspberry and red currant that takes a savoury turn. And then it silkens on the palate, as expected. This really helps to define and perpetuate the Greek red religion, drinkable and ageable, agreeable and to prudence by stashing some away. This is the Lykos high end agiorgitiko, one year in barrel with six types of barrels employed, all with varying toasts. Great length and the wood is merely a conduit of spice, texture and length. Really well done and shows that this winemaker has a way with reds. Drink 2018-2022.  Tasted March 2017  @LYKOSWINERY  lykounanalykoswineryevia  @LykosWinery

Troupis Fteri Agiorgitiko 2015, PGI Peloponnese, Greece (Agent, $18.95, WineAlign)

Fteri from Yiannis Troupis is bright and ripe for the oft dusty and cured St. George, here in clean, pure, crisp form. Seemingly void of dried fruit, out of tank and no barrel, this is the fresh maker, ready for the here and now. It’s just bloody delicious, of plums and cherries, refreshing and miles from rustic. At $16 back up the truck because this could be the gamay or sangiovese of your summer dreams, or a marriage of the two. remarkable. Luminous, naturally fortified by dry extract and sweet tannin favour. The final cut is the chew, like a bite into a rare steak with no game. Drink 2017-2018.  Tasted May 2017  @TroupisWinery  @VictoryWine  troupiswinery  victorywineandspiritsinc  @troupis.winery  Victory Wine & Spirits Inc. 

Skouras Saint George Agiorgitiko 2013, AOP Nemea, Greece (Agent, $19.95, WineAlign)

Both Saint George and Aghiorhitiko grace the label (not agiorgitiko) in this juicy and rambling red, full of tangy red fruit and bright, if quite vivid acidity. There is a good amount of chew and then some baking spice bite on the quick finish. Drink 2017-2018.  Tasted May 2017  @DOMAINESKOURAS  @KolonakiGroup  skourasdomaine  @KolonakiGroup  @domaineskouras

Gaia Agiorgitiko Nemea 2015, Greece (Agent, $21.30, WineAlign)

From Koutsi in Nemea, Gaia’s 100 per cent agiorgitiko is wonderfully dusty, ripe and modern, like clean and pure merlot in a way, with mulberry and raspberry fruit notes followed by bushy mountain savour. There is this perfectly tidy sour tang on the palate that mingles nicely with the early dusty and leathery notes, creating a kind of agiorgitiko liqueur that only it can exude. It’s like Rosso di Montalcino or more like Tuscan IGT (with merlot adding to sangiovese). A chewy and crunchy mouthful to be sure and blessed with a shot of bitters and very good length. Drink 2018-2021.  Tasted May 2017  @GaiaWines  @Smallwinemakers  gaiawines  @GaiaWinesGR  @smallwinemakerscollection

Ktima Papaioannou Single Vineyard Old Vines Agiorgitiko 2010, Nemea, Greece (Agent, $33.95, WineAlign)

The oldest vines from the endemic Nemea grape are chosen for this 17,000 bottle lot, an agiorgitiko of native charm and relevant substance. Substantial in fruit and beautifully rustic, dried fruit and potpourri aromas, the texture is complacently integrated now ten years after bottling. The happy blues of its notes are sung with painless refrain, with cedar, leather, resin and fine-spun acidity all rolled in, some baking spice and the tonic abilities of aperitifs. The vegetal component is not green but it is an oxidative style, pretty, woody and wild. A spoonful or a cupful, whichever your pleasure, will do just fine. “Could fill spoons full of coffee, could fill spoons full of tea. Just a little spoon of your precious love; Is that enough for me?” Drink 2017-2019.  Tasted May 2017    @KolonakiGroup  @KolonakiGroup

Cabernet Sauvignon

Domain Mega Spileo Cabernet Sauvignon 2009, Peloponnese, Greece (Agent, $27.95, WineAlign)

Such varietal accuracy is an exceptionality of Stelios Tsiris’ “Megali Ambelos,” great vineyard gifted cabernet sauvignon. The plateau narrative spoken at 800m along the Diakofto-Kalavrita Road above Vouraikos canyon is not unlike the endemic vernacular but with a firm handshake and bold tannin. The palate is silky and pleasantly savoury, then tart but intensely so. The alcohol measures 15 per cent but is handled with refined power. Like Stelios there is a gentle, polite and powerful confidence with length to scamper up and down the Vouraikos slopes, up to the monastery and back. We’re also dealing with 15-20 years of possibility. Mega Spileo’s is one of the top Greek cabernet sauvignon. Two are better than one. Drink 2017-2026.  Tasted March 2017    @apostolosGW  #MegaSpileo  Apostolos Gerakinis

Limniona

Tsililis Limniona 2013, PGI Meteora, Greece (WineAlign)

Limniona is the newest of discoveries, a highly aromatic red, with dried fruit like agiorgitiko, but here from Theopetra Estate in Thessaly, Northern (Central) Greece. There is a minty peach and pomegranate aromatic and texture in a real stretched, elastic and bounce back way, with structure like nebbiolo but with more intense poly-phenolic character. I don’t find this bretty or funky at all but rather as a wild floral and fruit display like a rustic Langhe, with dust and diesel. It’s also savoury like cabernet franc and of something nutty (like Nutella), which is really the barrel talking in smooth ganache chocolate lingo. You’ve got to try this. Drink 2017-2019.  Tasted May 2017    #theopetraestate

Tetramythos Winery

Mavro Kalavryta

Domaine Tetramythos Kalavryta 2016, PGI Achaia, Peloponnese, Greece (SAQ 11885457, $17.05, WineAlign)

This mavro kalavryta repeats the same alcohol and acidity as 2014 and the tune sees no change. Once again we are graced with a back up the track, gamay-nerello mascalese-cabernet franc-fresh tempranillo vein, still so fresh and even minor reductive and chewy. So freakin’ delicious. Drink 2017-2021.  Tasted March 2017  @Tetramythos  #tetramythoswines  @tetramythoswines  Devon Masciangelo

A sneak peek of @thymiopoulosvin ’15’s was reason enough to fly all the way to #paris #gareaugorille #rapsani #xinomavro #terreetciel #earthandsky #apostolosthymiopoulos

Xinomavro

Boutari Grande Reserve Naoussa 2010, Naoussa, Greece (140111, $17.95, WineAlign)

Naoussa Xinomavro with six years of age is just a baby, seemingly evolved but in so many ways, anything but. The fruit aromas are dried, from raisin to fig and the accents are all kalamata olive and date. This has real drying tannins and a savoury, dusty, musty feel. In 2010 it’s still very good, cementing more legacy defining consistency, but it’s not the best ever. Drink 2016-2020.  Tasted April 2016 and May 2017  @boutari  @KolonakiGroup  @DrinkGreekWine  @winesofnaoussa

Thymiopoulos Xinomavro 2014, PDO Naoussa, Greece (Agent, $19.95, WineAlign)

There is certainly more earth than sky this time around, probably because you couldn’t see it through all the rain. In a tough (and nearly disastrous) vintage that will test a winemaker’s mettle, it’s a good thing to have some history in pocket to draw upon and help pull you through. “My family has always been growing grapes,” tells Apostolos Thymiopoulos. They sold off their crop to other wineries but that changed in 2003 when Apostolos returned from having finished his oenology studies. His father was a long time practitioner of organics and Apostolos didn’t know why but today he knows and is thankful for it. Healthy vineyards, low yields and a father’s acumen now help to plough through adversity. The declassified fruit (with no Earth and Sky produced) sees the volatility and acidity down in ’14, but there is no compromise to the purity from a pure terroir. Texture and complex flavours are also compromised but again, purity can never be denied. Drink this honest, direct, ruby, deep rosey and ropey xinomavro for the next two years while both the haughty ’13 and ’15 bottles of Earth and Sky rest, evolve and eventually settle into their skins. Drink 2017-2019.  Tasted November 2016 and May 2017  @thymiopoulosvin  @VictoryWine  @winesofnaoussa  apostolosthymiopoulos  eletsi  victorywineandspiritsinc  Eleftheria Tsitsipa  Victory Wine & Spirits Inc.  @WinesofNaoussa

Thymiopoulos Young Vines Xinomavro 2015, PDO Naoussa, Greece (Agent, $20.00, WineAlign)

Here is the Naoussa little angel xinomavro affiche sans barrel, just pure, unadulterated, elastic and playful fruit in a glass. The xinomavro that everyone should know and love, enjoy with reckless, gulpable abandon and put seriousness aside. From 2015, a “3000 per cent better vintage than ’14” says Apostolos Thymiopoulos with a smile of relief and bounce back determination. There was some rain but not too hard so this Young Vines is able and enterprising to dance the passionate Thymiopoulos two-step, from the earth and with a momentary gaze up to the sky. The last thing you need to know is how lithe and ethereal this is, like pinot noir, in Naoussa, with xinomavro. Drink 2017-2020.  Tasted May 2017  @thymiopoulosvin  @VictoryWine  @winesofnaoussa  apostolosthymiopoulos  eletsi  victorywineandspiritsinc  Eleftheria Tsitsipa  Victory Wine & Spirits Inc.  @WinesofNaoussa

Thymiopoulos Terre Et Ciel Xinomavro Unfiltered 2015, PDO Naoussa, Greece (Agent, $35.23, WineAlign)

The Thymiopoulos estate vineyards are located in two villages, Trilofos and Fytia. The blend of the two is this flagship xinomavro, Yn Kai Oupavós. Known to us mere western mortals as Earth and Sky, the organic one from Apostolos Thymiopoulos and Eleftheria Tsitsipas picks up where the cherry chewy and very elongated 2013 left off (because 2014 was a difficult and therefore declassified vintage). The house habit of natural fermentation allows xinomavro to do the natural habitat, naturalist’s way, to look into the grape’s mirror and see its reflection naked, pure and clear. This is my second tasting of the ’15 Earth and Sky and though it continues to show some volatility (in the most beneficial way) it has settled (since November) and is now developing its second skin. The leathery hide was quite tough to begin and now gives off a sheen and sweet perfume that only this wine can gift. It also delivers a shot of honeyed, microbial goodness (in the context of its seamless package) with dance party energy. You will taste few wines like this and have not lived until you do. There is genius in this developing story, still in its infancy and on the road to legendary. Mythical even. One for and with the vine. Drink 2018-2028.  Tasted November 2016 and May 2017  @thymiopoulosvin  @VictoryWine  @winesofnaoussa  apostolosthymiopoulos  eletsi  victorywineandspiritsinc  Eleftheria Tsitsipa  Victory Wine & Spirits Inc.  @WinesofNaoussa

Red Blends

Domain Mega Spileo III Cuvée 2014, PGI Achaia, Peloponnese, Greece (Agent, $19.95, WineAlign)

The three varietal blend breaks down as mavrodafne and cabernet sauvignon (40 per cent each) plus agiorgitiko. The liquid chalk shapes into classic Achaia red wine though the mavrodaphne really stands apart. The notes of orange, pomegranate, currant and cranberry develop their combined keen sense of locale tartness. This carries sensory development and a right meets proper sheen, where old and new school meet at the twain. Drink 2017-2019.  Tasted May 2017    @apostolosGW  #MegaSpileo  Apostolos Gerakinis

Domaine Mercouri Red 2014, Vin De Pays Des Letrinon, Greece (213388, $18.70, WineAlign)

A blend of refosco and mavrodaphne, the IGP Leprini from Mercouri is oaky western Peloponnese rusticity at its finest. The nose is wild red berry simple syrup mixed with high-tonal volatility and new leather. The palate follows the thread, like rustic garnacha from Aragon and then a shot of adrenaline mixed with absinthe bitters. For fans of the deep smoky and oaky Greek style. Drink 2017-2019.  Tasted May 2017

Spiropoulos Porfyros 2013, Peloponnese, Greece (252147, $19.85, WineAlign)

The expatriate Bordeaux grapes cabernet sauvignon, cabernet franc and merlot join with organic agiorgitioko for a dark, hematic, ferric and rustic red, of more barrel than fruit. It’s hard to get past the wood, in fact the high-toned and wild-eyed hopeful fruit is suffocated under that milkshake sheathing. The attempt here is more west coast California than anything else but the result is savoury-syrupy and overly sour acidic in the end. If you like it earthy, robust and glossy then by all means. A deep braise of lamb shanks would help the cause. Drink 2018-2021.  Tasted May 2017

Askitikos Red 2013, Thessalia, Greece (485938, $19.95, WineAlign)

This is a highly modern blend of agiorgitiko, syrah and cabernet sauvignon from Thessalia with plenty of ripeness, dark fruit notes and ample wood spice. It carries quite the moderate temper and nice balance between fruit and acidity with easy on the palate tannin. Nothing shocking or out of the ordinary and could be from just about anywhere in Greece. Drink 2017-20219.  Tasted April 2017    #askitikos

Gaia Wines “S” 2014, PGI Peloponnese, Greece (AgentWineAlign)

From the Koutsi hillside, the sensory blend is agiorgitiko (70 per cent) and syrah, a stunning, speculative, modern Greek paradoxical study. Youthful, tannic and structured, here comes the sun from Yiannis Paraskevopoulos, with eyes, mouth and mind wide open. Antinori’s Tignanello may be the inspiration but this Super Nemea is all Greece. Black fruit and silky texrure as expected but once again, the place is the dynamic and the answer to the illimitable mystery. Drink 2017-2023.  Tasted May 2017  @GaiaWines  @Smallwinemakers  gaiawines  #smallwinemakerscollection  @GaiaWinesGR  @smallwinemakerscollection  

Mega Spileo Monastery

Domain Mega Spileo Red 2010, Peloponnese, Greece (466110, $29.95, WineAlign)

From one of the great vineyards in the Peloponnese, or all of Europe for that matter, Mega Spileo (Grand Cave) is set within a dramatically oriented steppe of an amphitheatre, in a bowl beneath the shadow of a 940m rock that houses the great Greek Orthodox monastery of Mega Spileo. Nowhere else in the Chelmos mountains does monk viticulture resonate as it does here. Perched above the Vouraikos Canyon at 800m of height, the vineyard sits like a slowly lowered field, dropped down past the granite walls to settle in its place. Winemaker Stelios Tsiris makes this ambitious Greek red, with generous old oak fashion and despite its dried fruit and old, dry tar personality, its spirit is lifted with great Greek acidity. It’s rustic, deferential and so interesting to behold. Drink 2017-2020.  Tasted January 2017

Kir Yianni Two Olives 2013, PGI Imathia, Greece (Agent, $33.95, WineAlign)

“Dyo Elies,” or two olives is a blend of syrah, merlot and xinomavro from Naoussa, ripe, sheathed in beneficial oak and ripping with sweet and sour acidity. This is a decidedly firm and grippy blend, quite tannic and with length for days. The moniker is quite apropos because this solicits thoughts of those typical Mediterranean notes, of black olive and garrigue. I’m not sure the olives is so approachable yet, even at four years from harvest and would suggest waiting a further two (or even four) to dig in. Drink 2019-2024.  Tasted May 2017  @kiryianni  @KolonakiGroup  kiryianni  kolonakigroup  @KirYianni  @KolonakiGroup

Black Corinthian Raisin in early stages of veraison #manyshadesofachaia #prettyinpeloponnese

Good to go!

Godello

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WineAlign

Gateway to Achaia, from Roditis to Mavrodaphne

Gate to Achaia Clauss Winery, Achaia

Gate to Achaia Clauss Winery, Achaia

A week of immersion on the ground running in Achaia drafts a new set of varietal tasting parameters. What is new to me are anent varieties of old. Roditis, Sideritis, Mavrodaphne and Mavro Kalavryta may be the grapes of ancients but obscurity be sprinkled, their resurrection blows forth in full paroxysmal scatter. The appeal is symptomatic of the new search for greatness in far away places.

Related – Till I reach Achaia ground

In  the second week of July I tasted through Patras and Achaia in the Greek Peloponnese. Here are 55 reviews from 10 producers.

Tetramythos

8ο kil. Pounta-Kalavrita, Ano Diakopto, 25003, Greece, 2691097500 The most modern facility in all of Achaia, re-built after a fire destroyed the property more than 10 years ago. Owned and operated by the brothers Aristos and Stathis Spanos.

Panyiotis Panagianopoulos, Tetramythos Winery

Panyiotis Panagianopoulos, Tetramythos Winery

Oenologist since 1999 is Panayiotis Papagiannopoulos, a winemaker who may just have been separated from twin Frank Zappa at birth. Located at Ano Diakopto of Egialia, on the slopes of Mount Chelmos, the 14 hectares of vineyards (450-1,000m) are farmed organically (and have been since 1997). Bush vines make up 80 per cent and endemic varieties (85 per cent) cultivated (plus some expatriates) are Roditis, Malagousia, Sauvignon Blanc, Mavro Kalavryta, Agiorgitiko, Cabernet Sauvignon and Merlot. The total production is 13,000 cases with export to foreign markets (80 per cent) that exceeds peers by a wide margin.

Tetramythos Winery

Tetramythos Winery

Tetramythos Roditis 2014, PDO Patras, Greece (SAQ 12484575, $15.75, WineAlign)

Pulled from four vineyards at 650-850m of altitude and from vines 19-42 years old. No skin contact though it shows a light, slight tinge of colour. Nearly platinum in its yellow hue, perhaps attributed to organics says Papagiannopoulos, Eighty per cent was achieved through natural ferment (with zero malolactic) plus “one tank for security.” Roditis can go clean or develop anti-austerity, texture, viscosity in the direction of a dirty projector. The Tetramythos glides “forward through the clover and the bergamot.” I can see what she’s seeing. Tasting like a leesy ripe peach, this is the best “basic” Roditis tasted in Achaia. Serious match of Aleria Restaurant‘s Sea Bass Tartare. Drink 2015-2020.  Tasted July 2015

Tetramythos Roditis 2014, PGI Peloponnese, Greece (WineAlign)

Here speaks the truth in endemic Roditis, raised in unconscious, wild ferment, unfiltered, forsaken to fining and treated to minimal sulphur. From 47 year-old vines, this most natural Peloponnese is made for the French market (that includes Quebec) with elevated acidity, deeper mineral, higher tang, pomp, circumstance and attitude. Latin, really, striking actually. Drink 2015-2018.  Tasted July 2015

Tetramythos Roditis 2014, PGI Achaia, Greece (WineAlign)

Roditis is here designated as the traditional Retsina, subjugated to wild yeasts in clay amphora and no sulphur during alcoholic fermentation. From 25 year-old vines out of a single vineyard and pine resin collected from trees on the edge of the vineyard. Post low and slow fermentation the wine rests on its lees for two months.  Such a wild and sauvage display of terroir; pine resin, beeswax, sealants and amphora. Like pure pine distillate without excessive herbaceousness and in subtlety of its own complacency. The palate follows the other roditis renditions and the pine again returns on the finish. 14,000 bottles made. Drink 2015-2019.  Tasted July 2015

Tetramythos Malagoussia 2014, PGI Achaia, Greece (WineAlign)

A single vineyard at an altitude of 750m guided by 30 hours of skin contact, for mouthfeel, to saddle the cool climate herbiage, needed for structure and for distance. Exudes poise, presence, precision, not oily but somehow creamy, glistening, this glow of malagousia. Expresses the longest hang time in the mouth, lingering like no roditis can or is willing to. Thanks to early picking to preserve acidity, the alcohol is low (12.4 per cent) and that acidity (7.2 g/L) above and beyond. Only here does malagousia keep this kind of flinty bite, in kind to a mid-September pick, keeping on the right side of soft and hot. I think this will live longer than you think.  Drink 2015-2020.  Tasted July 2015

Tetramythos Roditis 2008, PDO Patras, Greece (WineAlign)

A wine to fulfill the promise of my own personal vindication. I had asked Angelos Rouvalis about laying Roditis down for three to five years or more, to see where it may go and he said, “why?” Here is why. Has fan vaulted to the skies, urged by petrol and a symphony of mythology. Akin and within aromatic mineral reach of sémillon or riesling, with just a basal drip of ambrosial, gaseous honey. The green notes (of pea and nettle) are exaggerated but that is attributed to 2008 fruit that may have never been fully ripe. Drink 2015-2017.  Tasted July 2015

Tetramythos Roditis 2014 and Muscat Sec Blanc Nature 2014

Tetramythos Roditis 2014 and Muscat Sec Blanc Nature 2014

Tetramythos Muscat Sec 2014, PGI Peloponnese, Greece (WineAlign)

A slightly carbonic, reductive character – its natural protection, to keep the oxygen at bay, as if nouveau white Beaujolais. Combines bay laurel and beatific citrus, namely grapefruit after the banana blows off through the shutters of the cabana. Quite silky for muscat, of keys and zests citrus (major) and resin (minor). It may be sorry to leave you high and dry though there is no reason to feel a need to be weened off its charms. Far-out, groovy and compelling vin nature. Drink 2015-2018.  Tasted July 2015

Tetramythos Muscat Sec Blanc Nature 2014, PGI Peloponnese, Greece (WineAlign)

Nothing short of lucent, this friable, direct and crunchy raw muscat. Effusive of individual vowels and consonants, typically Achaian, extrapolated to Greek in its lambent and inventive simplicity. More glade than wax, it coats with orange and the spirit of lime. So different and yet so familiar, inevitably dry and straight as an arrow. Drink 2015-2018.  Tasted July 2015

Tetramythos Sauvignon Blanc Milia White 2014, PGI Achaia, Greece (WineAlign)

Not so many places are out there where sauvignon blanc grows at 1000m of altitude, so its got that going for it, which is nice. Add to that four months in new oak. What results is such a melon, citrus and high acidity tropical fruit mess. Wow is this piercing, almost over the top. Like sémillon this struts, in nod to the Hunter Valley. With time there is a varietal emergence. Eventually. Will age a spell. Drink 2015-2019. Tasted July 2015

Tetramythos Mavro Kalavryta 2014 (SAQ 11885457WineAlign)

A terrific example for a grape saved from extinction, Tetramythos owns 1.9 of a total four hectares of MK. Kudos for the effort especially considering the variety is thin skinned, slow to mature and difficult to cultivate. Saw nearly 20 days of skin contact because “the variety dictates the practice,” notes Konstantinos Lazarakis M.W. The fruit and bitters express a push-pull of terroir. One of two wineries making dry wines from the endemic variety, here the fresh red grape, the food friendly marker. Here confidently struts modern Achaian winemaking, from the ashes of naturalism and antiquity, the way Gamay or Loire Cabernet Franc are wont to do. Vibrant, with verve and a necessary natural funk. Herbal and with a rub of tomato skin, creamy, cool yet resinous, followed through from aroma to texture. Drink 2015-2018.  Tasted July 2015

Kotrotsos Moschofilero Erasmios 2014 and Tetramythos Mavro Kalavryta 2014

Kotrotsos Moschofilero Erasmios 2014 and Tetramythos Mavro Kalavryta 2014

Tetramythos Agiorgitiko 2013, PGI Peleponnese (SAQ 12178957WineAlign)

Raised in old oak barrels, it carries the wooden ship scent on the sea. Possessive of a world up in the wind, roofless, like an August cathedral and yet a grounding sense to burrow into earth. In all that sense it drafts like Nebbiolo indenture. Ferric and tannic, with end spice. Drink 2015-2018.  Tasted July 2015

Tetramythos Milia Red 2012, PGI Peloponnese, Greece (WineAlign)

A kaleidoscopic, cosmopolitan blend of merlot (66 per cent), cabernet sauvignon (20) and mavro (black) kalavrita (14) aged in 2nd, 3rd and 4th fill barrels. Here, again the use of Bordeaux varietals that cloud the vision of what the land wants to say. Sure it will speak in a language that resembles Terra Alta or some IGT but it has a nowhere man feel, a lack of somewheress and surely no word from the mouth of Papagiannopoulos. Very Mediterranean in feel, with a tapenade of black olive and caper. Drink 2015-2018.  Tasted July 2015

Tetramythos Cabernet Sauvignon 2011, PGI Aegialia Slopes (WineAlign)

A new Bordeaux language is created, in natural wild ferment, unfiltered and housed for 30 months in 2nd and 3rd fill barrels. A highly savoury cabernet sauvignon, with a lean and mean green streak. Tannic and very tight. Coated by a veneer and seething in teeth chattering acidity. Not for the faint of cabernet sauvignon heart and in need of double bottle time, in minimum two to one ratio of what it saw in wood. Much appreciation for the vision and the effort. Drink 2018-2021.  Tasted July 2015

Tetramythos Mavrodaphne Vin Naturellement Doux, Peleponnese, Greece (WineAlign)

As with so many of the Tetramythos line-up, this regional blend is the same but different. First it’s non vintage and second it is out of zone so not considered for PDO Mavrodaphne of Patras status. At 16 per cent alcohol and 58 g/L the sweet elixir spent nearly three years spent spinning in the excruciatingly slow centrifuge of natural fermentation. Traditional method adherence with the addition of organic, sun-dried raisins, “to increase the sugar levels.” The house quotient is three kilos of dried Black Corinth Raisin for every 100 L of must, in purport to increase the alcohol by one per cent. Here sweeps clean, sweet Mavro,  its port sensibility an aged, natural, dried fruit, nut and caramel melange. Pure beauty. Drink 2015-2025.  Tasted July 2015

Domaine Mega Spileo (Cavino)

The domain is set within a dramatically oriented steppe of an amphitheatre, in a bowl beneath the shadow of a 940m rock that houses the great Greek Orthodox monastery of Mega Spileo (Grand Cave). Nowhere else in the Chelmos mountains does monk viticulture resonate as it does here. The great vineyard (Megali Ambelos) perches above the Vouraikos Canyon at 800m of height. The winemaker for the wines of Cavino and Mega Spileo is Stelios Tsiris. Varieties grown since re-planting in 1999 include Mavrodafne, Mavro Kalavritino, Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot, Syrah, Lagorthi, Assyrtiko, Malagousia and Riesling.

Mega Spileo Monastery

Mega Spileo Monastery

Roditis 2014, PDO Patras, Greece

A textured Roditis, its constant refrain one of herbiage, mineral, savoury bite and a direct pinch of austerity. Radiates fashioned with poise and meaning. Drink 2015-2017.  Tasted July 2015

Malagousia 2014, PGI Achaia, Greece

From a blend of three vineyards at 800m in altitude, this is a creamier, riper, more tropical take on the categorical grape. It’s tropical even, leaving peach to ascertain mango. Like a comfortable broth of warm emotions, this Malagousia belongs to the generality of varietal Greek persistence. Drink 2015-2018.  Tasted July 2015

Moschato 2014, PGI Achaia, Greece

Nearly bone dry (4 g/L RS) and well-nigh nicked by acidity (6.2 g/L TA) this is really a true expression of the Muscat Blanc à Petits Grains, an elegant cold pour into a glass on a breezy, sunny day. Until now Muscat in Achaia “could never look me in the eye” but the flurry of aromatics sing like a songstress in white lace. Its gaze is like lemon and olive oil and its tongue like the sweet wax on the rind. Here the Moschato path has been properly and soulfully taken. Rich in gold, like the kingdom of Agamemnon at Mycenae. Drink 2015-2017.  Tasted July 2015

Deus NV, Peloponnese, Greece

A blend of Moschato (80-90 per cent) and Sideritis, with a prodigious dosage to leave this sparkling wine larboard in the realm of 55 g/L of residual sugar. Translates to a tropical, custardy, sticky and waxy bubble that will repeatedly get you back in Achaia life again. Take a few sips “and I’ll drink and dance with one hand free.” You could really get stoned on this fizz. Drink 2015-2018.  Tasted July 2015

Deus Rosato NV, Peloponnese, Greece

Made from 100 per cent Syrah and slightly sweeter than the Muscat, here at 60 g/L RS. The lees, cheese and funk from Syrah turned to sparkling distracts from the sweetness, sending this to parts of southern France in meditative, Mediterranean, savoire savour faire. Raspberry and cranberry vie for sweet and sour supremacy and the wine actually, seemingly turns dry on the peppery, fizzy, tanky and spirited back side. Never backs down and the last conceit is one of tannin. So much more successful than the Moschato. Drink 2015-2019.  Tasted July 2015

Mega Spileo Moschato 2014 Deus and Deus Rose

Mega Spileo Moschato 2014 Deus and Deus Rose

Domaine Mega Spileo Grand Cave 2009, PGI Achaia

A dry vinified blend of Mavrodaphne (60 per cent) and Mavro (black of) Kalavritino that slumbers for 18-24 months (depending on who is offering the dissertation) in “squeaky clean” French oak. A pioneering bottle leading the charging trend to make dry wines from Mavrodaphne. Here so very layered, rich, ferric and in that vein, so very IGT. The oak is judged with a direct gaze into the eyes and density is furthered by demanding Daphne tannin, while flesh and elasticity is the work of the Kalavritino. Like a missile of tannic Syrah with Tuscan like cure in its veins and clotted plasma hanging on its dangling hook. Formidable to be sure. Drink 2017-2022.  Tasted July 2015

Domaine Mega Spileo Cabernet Sauvignon 2008, Peloponnese, Greece

An internationally stylized red that invokes the highest thoughts of all in, all out hedonism, more so than just about any varietal Bordeaux outside of Napa, Sonoma or the original mother land.

Thirty-two “boom shaka-laka-laka boom shaka-laka-laka” months in new French and american oak will do that, shouting “I want to take you Achaia” and in retort you should plead don’t leave me Achaia dry.

Looking back, in making decisions to make a wine like this, the thought would be “it’s the best thing that you ever had, the best thing you ever, ever had.” Fruit showtime is now fruit showing its age while oak is determined to suspend structure in purgatory. “Ain’t no valley low enough” so this style must have been tempting to have a go at the time, but times are changing. Ain’t no mountain Achaia enough? Not these days. Drink 2017-2022.  Tasted July 2015

Cavino Mavrodafne Reserve 2000 (Winery)

“We are about to experience one of the best underdogs of Greece,” says Konstantinos Lazarakis M.W. by way of introduction. The world had to wait 18 months plus seven years years for this to appear. A Port-style fortified red, fashioned from the 27 best judged oak barrels and finished in October of 2000. The mix is Mavrodaphne (70 per cent) and Black Corinth (30), expertly amassed and positioned at a time when using the 49 percent maximum allowance of dried raisin was the norm. Ahead of its time in that regards but also because of its rangy acidity, incredible acidity actually, something that gives this dessert wine the essence and spirit of raisin radio. That and a beautiful oxidation and it succeeds in wooing palates, not to mention fulfilling the promise laid bare by Mr. Lazarakis. Drink 2015-2020.  Tasted July 2015

Parparoussis

Achilleos str., 264 42 Proastio, Patras, Greece, 30 2610 420334, info@parparoussis.com

Antanassis Parparoussis and Moschato Vines, Domaine Parparoussis

Athanassios Parparoussis and Moschato Vines, Domaine Parparoussis

Founded in 1974 by oenologist Athanassios Parparoussis who works as winemaker while daughters   Erifili and Dimitra support on the business and marketing side. The winery is located in Patras and the property includes 10 hectares at Movri Achaias. Grapes are farmed organically and Parparoussis is one of only two vintners ion the region making wines from the rare and indigenous Sideritis. Parparoussis farms organically in principal but is not certified, nor is Athanassios concerned with the designation. It’s a matter of being devoutly pragmatic. “The soil is alive, so why kill it.”

Parparoussis Sideritis Dons De Dionysos 2014, Peloponnese, Greece (SAQ 11900995, $21.00, WineAlign)

The 2014 “gift of Dionysus” is herbal, arid, directly unassuming and fixed with a very savoury, nearly resinous pastel palate. The wind blows rosemary and lavender and truthfully it’s like a naturally cured red feeling in a white package. All lemon citrus at the tail. Drink 2015-2016.  Tasted July 2015

Parparoussis Rosé “Petite Fleur” 2014, PGI Achaia, Peloponnese, Greece

Just under 300 cases are made of this pale, lithe and prodigiously lithe blush wine, like the Dionysus, made from 100 per cent Sideritis. Skin maceration was performed overnight, “a one night stand,” while indigenous yeast was employed for a natural, dry vinification. The light and rust-directed antiquity of caste excess has caused an exaggerated herbal, namely oregano aroma. The overall feel is suppositious and may just be one of the great Rosé stories ever told. Drink 2015-2016.  Tasted July 2015

Parparoussis Sideritis Gift of Dionysus 2014 and Agiorgitiko Reserve 2010

Parparoussis Sideritis Gift of Dionysus 2014 and Agiorgitiko Reserve 2010

Parparoussis Les Dons de Dionysus 2010, PGI Achaia, Greece

Barrel Fermented blend of Assyrtiko (75 per cent) and Althorn (25). The first bottle is “not exactly as it should be,” oxidized and unpropitious, while the second pour much less so. In fact it tethers and teeters beautifully near that edge, on that razor the small creature walks, in a Dylan “what’s a sweetheart like you” way. So much more gumptive, anti-preemptive of depth, perception and possibility. Striking in its layering, stinging pierce of Assyrtiko with a suction of Althiri authority. Climbs upon itself and lingers in the air. “It’s done with a flick of the wrist.” Drink 2015-2020.  Tasted July 2015

Parparoussis Reserve Epilegmenos Oenos 2010, PDO Nemea, Greece

Further afield south in the Peloponnese comes this 100 per cent Agiorgitiko. The first bottle has a lactic-cheesy flaw, as if acetate of a mercaptan. One man’s flaw is another man’s history so the question does beg, was this meant to be? A winemaker’s intention? Apparently not. The second bottle, while still blessed of of a definite funk but one that is cleaner, unturned, a washed rind. So very dry. Drink 2015-2018.  Tasted July 2015

Parparoussis Rose Petite Fleur 2014 and Taos 2010

Parparoussis Rose Petite Fleur 2014 and Taos 2010

Parparoussis Taos 2010, PGI Achaia, Greece

A barrel fermented, dry vinified, 100 per cent Mavrodaphne. Naturally pitchy, high in acidity and purposed in tannin. A rare zero dilution at the hands of Black Corinthian Raisin and therefore not so high in alcohol, despite the richness of hue. Actually has a modern next tier level of complexity, complexion and aromatic intensity. Purple flowers and plum swirl in its circuitous, cycloid multiplicity. The savoury, resinous black bay laurel and chalky, cooked lentil, the grill and its smouldering charcoal are all in. Further resinous of bay oil on the back bitters and a very Tentura finish. Wild, sauvage, beautiful and built for the ling haul. Drink 2018-2025.  Tasted July 2015

Paparoussis Mavrodaphne of Patras Reserve 2003, PDO Patras, Greece

Vin Doux Nature poured from a 500 mL bottle, at 19 per cent, this is intensely nutty, of crème caramel and Cassis together as one. A marriage of godly sanctified vin santo cordial, with quite the balance from a brilliant vintage. There is heat that never burns, and a piquancy that offers no needed warning, Mavrodaphne of an aged, expertly developed expression. Such bitters at the finish end with wow. Drink 2015-2023.  Tasted July 2015

Paparoussis Muscat of Rio 2010, PDO Rio Patra

The sugar here is a strapping 160 g/L and the cost 15 euros for a 500 mL bottle. A vin de paille with so much more delicacy, structure and elegance and at only 13.5 per cent, a remarkable wine. Spice and relish is so smothered, coddled and pampered. The length is incredible. This is remarkable dessert wine with all tempos in balanace. Drink 2015-2030.  Tasted July 2015

Oenoforos (Rouvalis)

Selinous, 25100 – Aiyion, Greece, 30 2691029415, info@rouvaliswinery.gr.

Aneglos Rouvalis and WineAlign's DJ Kearney

Aneglos Rouvalis and WineAlign’s DJ Kearney

Eonologist is Angelos Rouvalis, a winemaker with an encyclopedic knowledge of every hill and slope in the mountains above Patras and where each variety grows best. Established in 1990 by Rouvalis, a Bordeaux-trained winemaker, recognized internationally as a pioneer in the renaissance that has taken place in the Greek wine industry in recent years. In 1994 Yannis Karabatsos, an agricultural engineer and expert in Greek viticulture joined the winery. “The Oenoforos winery consists of five levels on the slopes of Aigialeia in the village of Selinous. It combines monastic simplicity with state-of-the-art technology.”

Oeneforos Roditis ‘Asprolithi’ 2014, PDO Patras, Greece (SAQ 978197, $16.50, WineAlign)

The “white stone” could be considered the Pinot Grigio of Greece though the pink-skinned variety grown here between 800-1000m is such a bleed of high altitude calcaire. An amalgamated, aromatic accumulation is all about citrus without the airs of pierce and secondary sandarac meets kedros that reminds of clementine. At 11.5 per cent alcohol and low pH it might confuse for Trocken Riesling if not for its classic herbiage and austerity. Drink 2015-2018.  Tasted July 2015

Oenoforos Chardonnay Ianos 2009, Peloponnese, Greece

So buttered and creamy, in condition of its two years in oak. Age has delivered corn to popcorn. It’s both unambiguous and atypically Peloponnese, if certainly symptomatic of Chardonnay in a diaspora that veers from its regional path. Like the oak of all clothed Chardonnays, expect the excepted and drink up. Drink 2015-2016. Tasted July 2015

Oenoforos Cabernet Sauvignon Ianos 2004, Peloponnese, Greece (SAQ 11607342, $22.95, WineAlign)

A current release, all in Cabernet Sauvignon 10 plus years down its road after two years in French oak. A bold and state-of-the art for its time cool-climate take, with a clear and ad hoc Sonoma-like intention, with attitude out of altitude despite ’04’s nothing but average growing season. Herbaceous and currant direct Cabernet with plenty of fruit that has remained true and in the bottle. Sweet scents, floral and red citrus and expressly, naturally Greek. Red fruit from red soil. Has a natural, slightly oxidative cure that has emerged out of that oak shell. Strikes as a wine that needed this extended held-back time to get to this place. The palate’s fruit is dried and saline now, with tannin insistent in persistence. Rich but not nearly so, a gently rolling and evolving Cabernet with life in it yet, though the raisin character suggests now is better than tomorrow. Not so much mythologically invented, as it is internationally purposed, so it’s more a matter of higher and lower. The wine’s universe is a flat disc with hills, touched at its rims by the vast dome of the heavens. Drink 2015-2016.  Tasted July 2015

Oeneforos Rosé Mikros Vorias 2014, Peloponnese, Greece

Syrah with Viognier and Roditis. A layer upon layer blush combing of dry extract over full extract. Another example of the region’s ability to achieve Rosé excellence and the practice should both be encouraged and expanded upon. Drink 2015-2016.  Tasted July 2015

Oeneforos Chardonnay-Sauvignon Blanc Mikros Vorias 2014, Peloponnese, Greece

The white blend representation for the house line of fresh and direct wines translates to “small northern wind,” and here the SB sticks out like an Achaian thumb, dominating the nose with grass and capsicum. It’s toasty and almost Pouilly-Fumé smokey mixed with a pinch of Fuissé. The identity quandary brings Galician Albariño to mind, seen in the spirited almost effervescent tinniness. Very lime palate and fast forwards to stage right, running all the way. Drink 2015-2016.  Tasted July 2015

Oenoforos Merlot-Cabernet Sauvignon Mikros Vorias 2014, Peloponnese, Greece

Rusty and cured, just not quite ripe red plum, from a 60-40 combo, with a healthy level of veneer. Has gumption, pierce and a citrus red bleed. Drink 2015-2018.  Tasted July 2015

Oenoforos Asprolithi 'White Stones' 2014 and Syrah Ianos 2007

Oenoforos Asprolithi ‘White Stones’ 2014 and Syrah Ianos 2007

Oenoforos Syrah Ianos 2007, Peloponnese, Greece

Ferric, volatile, bretty but believe me when I say, all in a good way. The lingering meaty chew and porcine Mulligatwany is the expatriate Syrah equivalent of high gastronomy. A wild and wooly match to the Beef Stifado at To Katafygio. Drink 2015-2016.  Tasted July 2015

Antonopoulos Vineyards

25008 Vassiliko Chalandritsas, Patra, 30 2694061447, info@antonopoulosvineyards.com

The winery was founded by the late visionary winemaker, Constantinos Antonopoulos near the city of Patras in the northwestern of Peloponnese. Constantinos saw the vast, untapped potential of this diverse landscape, especially the mountainous region of Achaia and the unique winemaking opportunities it presented. A new up to-date winery has been built recently at Vasiliko, Achaia, where the majority of the winery’s vineyards are. Indigenous Greek varieties are the focus. All three Antonopoulos wines tasted at the winery Achaia Clauss were clearly achieved through very serious work. Though clean beyond the pale, they all exhibit slightly to more than leesy and all finish with so much salinity and limestone inflection. The only thing missing is the crustaceous accent.

Antonopoulos Vineyards

Antonopoulos Vineyards

Antonopoulos Moschofilero 2014, PGI Arkadia, Greece

A rich, striking, citrus Moschofilero with a beautifully severe tannic tang and many layers, scraped from a stone’s bleed and a gaze into the rock’s mirror. A wine akin to a creation of a true alphabet, made complex like the dactylic hexameter in poetry or a rhythmic scheme. Drink 2015-2018.  Tasted July 2015

Antonopoulos Adholi This White 2014, PGI Achaia, Greece

Essential and pedigreed blend of Lohorthi 65 per cent), Chardonnay (20) and Roditis (15) that expresses increased aromatics much like Viognier. Nearly profoundly tropical but so very dry, like Assyrtiko in its cracking open but with the feel of wild yeast and the feign of barrel. Chalk it up to 800-900m clay-limestone speak and no more than that, creasing to a crisp effervescence without bubble, yet it does tingle of the tongue. Like it’s working all the while, then on to citrus on the end, in lemon and lime torque as if by Riesling. The Moschofilero might be Mycenaean Linear B and this the other, later Greek alphabet. Drink 2015-2018.  Tasted July 2015

Antonopoulos Malagousia 2014, PGI Achaia, Greece

From sand and clay vineyards in the region of Aghios-Athanasios at a height of 600-900m. Picked late near the end of September to early october and cocrete and thought the ferment is a stainless one, this Malgousia exhibits a natural yeasty funk commingling with moving texture and savour that incorporates grasses. The sting of nettle wins over the softness and spumes a hay fever of grass. A warming, adult of a wine, with some power to age. Drink 2016-2021.  Tasted July 2015

Acheon Winery

Korinthou 121, Aigio, Greece, 30 26910 28062, info@acheonwinery.gr.

Sosanna Katsikosta is Oenologist and General Manager while Katerina heads up business and marketing operations. The sisters are carrying on a winemaking tradition passed on to them from their late father. Konstantinos Katsikostas carried the torch from his father Luke who founded the winery in 1946 in the area of Palaiokamares of Aegio. Annual production of 2,000 cases. Katsikosta is desperately, passionately practicing, experimenting, trying to stir up vinous ghosts and find their way back to ancestry, to ways of elders, to bring to light what used to be and to establish an identity for the world to see.

Acheon Roditis 2014, PDO Patras, Greece

A quintessential “Fox” Roditis, from low yields (40 hL/L), 900 m above sea level, in organic balance at 12 per cent alcohol. A distinct stone tang, push, pierce and a slight tingle or fizz on the tip of the tongue. Highly concentrated out of an elevated dry extract, with mineral and lemon. One of the more expressive push-pull of fruit and mineral. For everyday consumption with a bit of honey in its two to three year future. Drink 2015-2018.  Tasted July 2015

Acheon Sideritis 2014, PGI Achaia, Greece

The nearly extant one, a rare variety, being revived, planted at low altitudes, with yields 70-75 hL/L. Aromatic and misunderstood, with a Savagnin character, a funky, musky skin, like leather but not as deep, yet something oddly tropical, like jackfruit, or gummy bear, dusty ginger, and resin, like thyme. Another variety being worked with to see what it can be and to link back to what once was. Really good acidity. Drink 2015-2016.  Tasted July 2015

Acheon Sideritis 2014 and Rose Fairytale 2014

Acheon Sideritis 2014 and Rose Fairytale 2014

Acheon Moschato 2014, PGI Achaia, Greece

A banana and metal White Muscat, with plenty of herbal qualities, terrific saline and stony acidity dominating the palate. A medicinal grapefruit chew, not of pith, but of skin. Arid as a grove in wind and finishing with good length. Very interesting. Drink 2015-2017.  Tasted July 2015

Acheon Laura Nera 2012, PGI Eigialia Slopes

Mavrodaphe and nothing but, vinified dry, subjected to no aging. The smell of bay laurel (thus the varietal name) and fashioned for freshness. Still in command of a musty emmision this one, a strange cure, like some cool-climate, winter hardy hybrids, like Maréchal Foch and Frontenac. Perhaps a touch warmer, like opening the doors to Pinotage without the toast and the oak to fill and sweeten the green, reductive gaps. Has the roadhouse blues so “Keep your eyes on the road, your hands upon the wheel.” Drink 2015-2017.  Tasted July 2015

Acheon Rosé Fairytale, Peloponnese, Greece

A semi-sweet Rosé composed from 90 per cent Muscat co-fermented with 10 per cent Mavrodaphne. Dessert of blush hue and sappy, leesy, medicinal bitters. Very orange rind and chlorite, somewhat port-esque but so much more a tisane of pekoe and cough elixir. Totally off the charts different. Really like nothing tasted before. Drink 2015-2016.  Tasted July 2015

Wines of Parparoussis, Loukatos and Kontrotsos, Parparoussis Winery, Patras

Wines of Parparoussis, Loukatos and Kontrotsos, Parparoussis Winery, Patras

Kotrotsos

Vassiliko Achaias TK. 25008, 30 26940 61 900, vinko@otenet.gr. Winemaker is Giannis Kotrotsos.

Kotrotsos Erasmios Moschofilero 2014, Peloponnese, Greece

An unctuous, ambrosial Moschofilero, highly aromatic, of citrus and orange grove. A 12.5 appealing alcohol per cent and surround sound of acidity, good length and a bitter ending that follows a twinge of steely crick. Drink 2015-2018.  Tasted July 2015

Kotrotsos Muscat NV, PDO Muscat of Rio Patras

Also based on the 2013 vintage and c charging in at 15 per cent alcohol, here there is more rust, funk and metal, certainly not as fruit forward as expected. Sweetness is elongated, stretched and elastic, then snaps back to linear and upright. Drink 2016-2022.  Tasted July 2015

Kotrotsos Mavrodaphne NV, PDO Mavrodaphne of Patras, Greece The standard 15 per cent alcohol and in this plugged in, short fuse sweet wine is highly intense and lit caper green, dried fruit and a serious pasticcio of botanicals, distilled into a major excitative and concentrated sweetness.  The second bottle tasted has so much more life and character. Much more sweet floral attractiveness and the sweetness is less pronounced as a result. Goes from spice and piquancy to sweetness with the right transitory methodology, culminating in a great LBV Port finish. Nutty and spicy. Tremendous fruit forward expression.  Drink 2016-2024.  Tasted July 2015

Kotrotsos Chardonnay Oinos Aekos 2014, PGI Achaia, Greece

Combinbes barrel and resin for a full on savoury effect and so much noticeable, piercing grape tannin. Fierce, uncompromising, non-integrating invaluable invalid of tannin. So very cool climate savoury Chardonnay. Striking actually and a very acquired taste. Drink 2015-2016.  Tasted July 2015

Kotrotsos Agiorgitiko Erasmios 2012, Nemea, Greece An intoxicating perfume, of violets and charcuterie, floral and cure, vegetative and saline. Lactic, talcy, opaque and dusty, like Cabernet Franc from the coolest locale. Finishes saline again, chewy even. Drink 2015-2018.  Tasted July 2015

Karelas Winery

Georgios J. Karellas A.V.E.E, 41-43, Skagiopouliou Str., Patras, 262 22, 30 2610 321 000, karelas7@hotmail.com

Karelas Winery was founded in 1936 by Georgios Karelas. Using the native ‘Mavrodaphne’ grape, the company is renowned for it’s sweet, dessert style Mavrodaphne wine.

Karelas Pelagos 2013, PGI Achaia, Greece

Merlot and Mavrodaphne share the cure and the veneer of a strange bedfellow blend, the old and the new, the rust and the dust, the red and the black, the visitor and the been there done that. Tough acidity and tannin over red citrus fruit. Not shy. Drink 2016-2020.  Tasted July 2015

Karelas Achais 2013, PGI Achaia, Greece

Cabernet Sauvignon and Mavrodaphne smothered in more  obvious oak, though less tension and demand. A softer wine in using Cabernet over Merlot, ripened easier, better, with a second gear and then  into acidity mode. Again the cool climate veneer with a warm, savoury, minty middle. Drink 2015-2019.  Tasted July 2015

Mega Spileo Mavrodaphne and Karelas Mavrodaphe Reserve 2009

Mega Spileo Mavrodaphne and Karelas Mavrodaphe Reserve 2009

Karelas Mavrodaphne Reserve 2009, PDO Mavrodaphne of Patras, Greece

The only Mavrodaphne aged in highly seasoned toasted new French barrels. The standard weight bearing 15 per cent alcohol and a similar feeling as with previous kicks at the sweet Mavrodaphne can, but more red fruit and brighter raisins in the sun. The spice and liqueur here seem less spirited and combine for a more mature, seasoned, reasoned, direct and ultimately cleaner expression. Captain Jack (or George) will get you Achaia tonight “and take you to your special island.” Drink 2015-2022.  Tasted July 2015

Loukatos

Loukatos Bros, Β 3 & ΟΤ 24, Industrial Zone Patra 25018 Achaia / Patra, Greece, 30 2610 647588,  info@loukatos.com.gr

Perhaps most famous for their local production of spirits, namely Tentura and Mastic, Loukatos does a bang up job with dessert wines, especially in their handling of Muscat from Patras.

Loukatos Mavrodaphne NV, PDO Mavrodaphne of Patras, Greece

Vin de liqueur clocking in at 15 per cent alcohol. The dried roses and red flowers in liqueur link it to the likes of a Late Bottle Vintage Port. Wakes with a start, in sting and presence. Really lingers, tasting of blanched nuts and Halls mentholyptus. This batch was blended with 47 percent corinithian grape. The finish is so Manischevitz. Drink 2015-2023.  Tasted July 2015

Loukatos Muscat of Patras and Mavrodaphne of Patras

Loukatos Muscat of Patras and Mavrodaphne of Patras

Loukatos Muscat NV, PDO Muscat of Patras (WineAlign)

A 15 per cent abv Vin de Liqueur largely based on the 2013 vintage. Very clementine and apricot nosed, impeccably balanced from viscous to intensity in grape, with nothing musty or musky about it, though there is a musk melon sense, a botrytis that is very clean. Another excellent, natural sweet Patras example of what Muscat can do, again at super low cost, with high flavour and here, more fruit forward than the Kotrotos. Drink 2015-2021.  Tasted July 2015

Hahalis (Chahalis) Mavrodaphne 2011, PDO Mavrodaphne of Patras, Greece

Spent one year in barrel, the Tentura Castro “The Castle” is raisined and resinous with so much heavy artillery and coats of armour. The macro intent so black and porous, oxidative but alive, heavy and warm in alcohol but spirited and shooting cupid’s arrows. Sweet and Amarone trophy in a sense, with licorice and spice unlike anything else. Idiosyncratic to the nth degree. Drink 2015-2021.  Tasted July 2015

Achaia Clauss Mavrodaphne NV, PDO Mavrodaphne of Patras, Greece

From a lot penned Bin 601 at the standard 15 per cent alcohol and acting like it came from a 100 year-old barrel, of sitting bull wisdom and Bavarian history. Much like port, like brandy spirits and liquorice melting into cinnamon and clove. Not so idiosyncratic but resinous, sappy and piquant. Once you come to know these wines they speak this very direct language. Drink 2015-2025.  Tasted July 2015

Patraiki Mavrodpahe NV, PDO Mavrodaphne of Patras, Greece

A direct, rich, full-bodied leathery red of fruit the same that soaks in simple, sweet liqueur. The most accessible, commercial macro-intention of the black laurel lot. Drink 2015-2020.  Tasted July 2015

Crisis? No one’s gonna bring Greece down, nor me neither, ’till I again reach Achaia ground.

Good to go!

http://www.winealign.com/profile/2058-mjg

Till I reach Achaia ground

View of the mountains of Achaia from Tetramythos Winery and Homestay, Ano Diakopto of Aegialia, on the slopes of Mount Chelmos, Peloponnese

View of the mountains of Achaia from Tetramythos Winery and Homestay, Ano Diakopto of Aegialia, on the slopes of Mount Chelmos, Peloponnese

as seen on WineAlign

Man I wish I was there right now. Have you recently pondered or are you considering a visit to Greece? Have the sensational media reports of the last month cast a shadow of doubt on your travel plans? Are you worried about economic crises, ATM line-ups, looting and civil unrest? Don’t be. Do not fall victim as prey to dictum on what you or those who are telling you really do not know. You should go. Greece is just fine thank you very much. She welcomes visitors with open arms. This is what she wants and what she needs.

Crisis, what crisis? 

I am no John Maynard Keynes, have never rooted with Milton Friedman and can’t confidently say that my economic stars align with Paul Krugman, but on my recent trip to Athens and Achaia I saw nary a sign of unparalleled and utter economic disaster, of panic, anarchy or civil disobedience. I had many a conversation about government, taxes and the Euro. I learned that no is the new yes, “but whatever…” and that Greek wine aligns with the functions of the European union.

Write your problems down in detail Take them to a higher place

I am inclined to say, with indubitable and unequivocal doubt that Greece is the safest, most affordable and stupidly beautiful place on the planet. There is adventure, breathtaking vistas and scarcely, if commensurately discovered antiquity at every turn. And there is wine. Exceptional wine. Singular wine. Mythological wine. I can tell you five things I learned about the 21st century state of things Greece.

  1. Athens is a busy, hot, labyrinthian metropolis that somehow feels like an ancient village. It may just be the most unassailable and secure Gotham I have ever encountered. It did not leave me tired, on the contrary, it fuelled invigoration.
  2. Encounters with beautiful, nurtured and erudite folks along the course of a given day affords an equipotentiality to reaffirm faith in humans. Doors are always open.
  3. Bad governance may lead to civil jeremiad and global media strategies built upon the inevitable crumbling foundations of sensationalism and hyperbole, but Greece’s main concern is just that. Bad governance. Business carries on as usual, albeit with a noticeable reduction in smoking and petrol usage, but restaurants, cafes, coffee shops and shopping are not on hold. Centuries have seen such woe and yet Greece persists, remains and progresses. “Believe only half of what you see and nothing that you hear.” America may have long ago entered its Last Great American Whale period but Greece? Not even close. “They say things are done for the majority” and in the case of Greece, that just may be true. In a time of crisis, there are many business opportunists. Hard times? Grow better grapes. Can’t sell them at home? Export more than before and make better money.
  4. The combination of mountains, ocean, beaches and the symbiotic proximity of the appositeness is nothing short of mind-altering, awe-inspiring and soul-asservating.
  5. Forget the idea that Greek wine offers up some of the best values, anywhere. Consider that sort of posturing a given and or inconsequential in consideration of the adage that good wine is good wine, period, regardless of price. The wine producing regions of Santorini (Aegean), Thessaloniki/Naoussa (Macedonia) and Nemea (Peloponnese) have made wide inroads on the global scene. Yet how many of you have ever heard of Achaia and Patras in the northern Peloponnese? It is on the verge of breaking out. Obscurity no longer. Uncertainty be gone.

At the pass

Greece has been mired in waiting, or depending on your level of positivity and how to spin, poised to break out. The Greek wine industry is securely fastened in a place somewhere between the relic glow of early period brilliance and the cusp of legacy defining, career opus penning compositions. It is a work in process and the best is yet to come. The wines of Achaia are entirely indicative of this intellection. Antiquity is an amazing tourist attraction and in Achaia, as in the entirety of Greece, you can’t blink without stumbling upon a metaphorical doric this or an allegorical ionic that. Cradles of civilization just have a certain den xéro̱ ti and Greece is the world super-power. The question begs. How does this apply to wine?

Like so many wine producing nations not called France, Germany or Italy, Greece is poised for modern greatness but it has one distinct advantage. It lays ownership to some absolute conditions that easily separate it from emerging and developing, New World regions, but also from European peers. The first is obvious and that of course is a centuries old tradition of making wine. The second may come as a surprise, especially as it relates to wine. Mythology covets a paradigmatic relationship with Greek culture, however intangible it can be quantified. A visit to Achaia offers tantamount proof of such a notion. This from New Wines of Greece: “The fascinating archaeological sites with the notable museums and the grape-growing and wine-making history directly tied to the myth of Hercules are just some of the attributes that will appeal to those who indulge in wine tourism in the Peloponnese.”

Then there is the confluence from the slopes of Egialia, said to form the centre of the triangle of Ancient DelfiOlympia and Epidavros. It was not long ago that I connected the divine and the allegorical with Greek wine. I quote myself. “Me, I’ll concentrate on the divine mythology of Greek wine, of its place in the fractal world, how it can beautify and simplify, through recursion in dynamic systems, the bleak chaos of wine landscapes. Like the Morai, Greek wines are thread with motherly nurturing. For mere mortals, they direct fate from the birth of their drinking days to death. They are a highly independent bunch, unobstructed and driven by necessity.” It would be obtuse to ignore the hyper-reality of all these extraordinary things, to discount the divined revelation through profound symbols of religious myth. To see the analogy and pertinency with the mathematics of wine; pH, sugar, acidity and alcohol. Not exactly Pythagorean, certainly not Orphic, but mysterious somehow.

The Achaia advantage: From PGI to PDO and endemic varietals

The Peloponnese is located in the southernmost section of continental (western) Greece, its western and northern borders lining the Ionian Sea and the Corinthian Gulf. Homer called it Ampeloessa, meaning “full of vines.” The Achaian advantage is more than just a matter of slope and soil. The Nazi attrocities committed at Kalavryta will always be remembered as the darkest of Peloponnese days but neither war nor Phylloxera has truly interrupted centuries of growth and tradition.

Achaia is one of Greece’s largest wine regions and its 31 wineries accounts for approximately 10 per cent of the national wine output. The mesoclimate of Achaia is determined by a combination of mountain and sea. Erymanthos, Panachaikos and Chelmos range for vines at up to 850m though in Egialia grapes grow as high as 1050m. There are slopes here with a northern aspect, a factor which is not lost on the winemaker in search of cool-climate viticulture. The mountain man of Eigalia Angelos Rouvalis points to the hills and talks of  “a rare terroir, where facing north can achieve a significant drop in temperatures, creating specific vine balances, which is difficult to achieve in other places.” It is also here that the waters of the gulfs (Patras and Corinth) cool and temper the climate. Stronger winds ward off the warmer streams blowing up from Africa, creating a much cooler viticultural area than Patras.

The northern Peloponnese vineyards are divided into four distinct viticultural locales. In the east, in the areas of Egialia (Aegialia) and Kalavryta, the PGI Egialia wines are produced. Egialia’s temperate climate and northerly orientation on (250 to 850m) slopes are protected by the cool summer sea breezes of the Gulf of Korinthos (Corinth). Pausanias was a Greek traveler and geographer of the 2nd century AD, who lived in the times of Hadrian, Antoninus Pius and Marcus Aurelius. He referred to the villages of Egialia as ideal for cultivating vines. Egialia soils vary from white calcareous to fertile sandy loam with good drainage.

It is in Egialia that the endemic white (blush) and highly aromatic variety Roditis ripens ever so gently. The varietal take in the lower (450 to 500m), yet similar climate for the vineyards of Patras makes for wines of fuller body. Lower Patras slopes are positioned for another indigenous grape, the red varietal Mavrodaphne. Traditionally purposed for desert wine, modern usage of the “black” Daphne is happening for dry table wine, as is the black of Kalavryta (Mavro Kalavryta), from grapes grown on slopes close to the tourist town of Kalavryta. The coastal flatlands between Patras and Rio to the east are dominated by the white Muscat. The varietal watch is on for Mavro Kalavryta, a grape that performs like Gamay or perhaps Cabernet Franc. In the hands of a winemaker like Panayiotis Papagiannopoulos it will be a wine to help mark the act of Achaia’s second renaissance. Konstantinos Lazarakis M.W. sees it as “the best Gamay that is not Gamay.” This is a man who knows his audience. 😉 This is a grape that will define fresh and further down the Peloponnese road for red wines and begin to separate from itself from other red attempts. It’s future will see the establishment of plots into crus, to make simple fruity reds to drink and also more serious wines, to experiment and to use some older barrels and to envision the future when it has been given some age.

Konstantinos Lazarakis M.W. and Sofia Perpera, New Wines of Greece at the Sailing Club Restaurant, Patras

Konstantinos Lazarakis M.W. and Sofia Perpera, New Wines of Greece at the Sailing Club Restaurant, Patras

The four officially recognized PDO‘s are Muscat of Patras, Muscat of Rio Patras, Mavrodaphne of Patras and Patras. The first three are produced in the central and western section of Achaia. The local Muscat is known to the world as Muscat Blanc à Petits Grains and in Achaia as Moschidi. Under the regulations of both Muscat PDOs the wines may be vin naturellement douxvin doux or vin doux naturel. PDO Patras is made from 100 per cent Roditis, though there are several clones of this variety. Specific clones are generally chosen based on altitude, as each variant has been proven to work on particular slopes. The top wines are produced from a red Roditis, also known as Alepou. The PDO Mavrodaphne of Patras (Fortified, Vin De Liqueur) can be fashioned with up to 49 per cent dried and rehydrated Corinthian Raisin (Black Currant) in the mix.

Black Corinth Grapes

Black Corinth Grapes

Despite the fact that the predominant amount (almost 99 per cent) of Black Corinth ends up in a pouch full of currants, its agricultural significance continues to play a role in the sweet red Mavrodaphne of Patras. Top quality vineyards have historically been cultivated with the Black Corinth because they fetch as much as 300 per cent more money than wine grapes. The bizarre terroir-varietal-trade flow chart is changing for the better but the raisins remain a long way from extinction. Slopes that face the sun perpetuate the propagation. Then there is the unusual scenario of the earthquake factor. “In Patras we are either raisining or shaking,” quips Lazarakis.

Kalavryta Mountain Tea

Kalavryta Mountain Tea

Other white varieties grown in the region include the extremely rare Sideritis (only two producers for the variety that shares a name in common with a flowering plant known as Greek Mountain Tea), Malagousia, Lagorthi, Chardonnay and Sauvignon Blanc. Other red grapes cultivated include Agiorgitiko, Xinomavro, Merlot, Cabernet Sauvignon and Syrah. The wines of Achaia are built upon an alcohol premise that keeps them stable, in balance and immune from oxidation. Their attitude fights the life work of Louis Pasteur and Jean-Antoine Claude Chaptal. If the wines lost some footing due to the trending towards bacteria and sugar mien, now, with the world peeling back from manipulated wines, the Achaian style is poised to grab their market share.

Accidental tourists at the Archaeological Museum of Patras

Accidental tourists at the Archaeological Museum of Patras

 

Tetramythos

8ο kil. Pounta-Kalavrita, Ano Diakopto, 25003, Greece, 2691097500 The most modern facility in all of Achaia, re-built after a fire destroyed the property more than 10 years ago. Owned and operated by the brothers Aristos and Stathis Spanos.

Panayiotis Papagiannopoulos, Tetramythos Winery

Panayiotis Papagiannopoulos, Tetramythos Winery

Oenologist since 1999 is Panayiotis Papagiannopoulos, a winemaker who may just have been separated from twin Frank Zappa at birth. Located at Ano Diakopto of Egialia, on the slopes of Mount Chelmos, the 14 hectares of vineyards (450-1,000m) are farmed organically (and have been since 1997). Bush vines make up 80 per cent and endemic varieties (85 per cent) cultivated (plus some expatriates) are Roditis, Malagousia, Sauvignon Blanc, Mavro Kalavryta, Agiorgitiko, Cabernet Sauvignon and Merlot. The total production is 13,000 cases with export to foreign markets (80 per cent) that exceeds peers by a wide margin.

Ano Diakopto of Egialia

Tetramythos Winery, Ano Diakopto of Egialia

Tetramythos Roditis 2014, PDO Patras, Greece (SAQ 12484575, $15.75, WineAlign)

Pulled from four vineyards at 650-850m of altitude and from vines 19-42 years old. No skin contact though it shows a light, slight tinge of colour. Nearly platinum in its yellow hue, perhaps attributed to organics says Papagiannopoulos, Eighty per cent was achieved through natural ferment (with zero malolactic) plus “one tank for security.” Roditis can go clean or develop anti-austerity, texture, viscosity in the direction of a dirty projector. The Tetramythos glides “forward through the clover and the bergamot.” I can see what she’s seeing. Tasting like a leesy ripe peach, this is the best “basic” Roditis tasted in Achaia. Serious match of Aleria Restaurant‘s Sea Bass Tartare. Drink 2015-2020.  Tasted July 2015

Tetramythos Roditis 2008, PDO Patras, Greece

A wine to fulfill the promise of my own personal vindication. I had asked Angelos Rouvalis about laying Roditis down for three to five years or more, to see where it may go and he said, “why?” Here is why. Has fan vaulted to the skies, urged by petrol and a symphony of mythology. Akin and within aromatic mineral reach of Sémillon or Riesling, with just a basal drip of ambrosial, gaseous honey. The green notes (of pea and nettle) are exaggerated but that is attributed to 2008 fruit that may have never been fully ripe. Drink 2015-2017.  Tasted July 2015

Tetramythos Roditis 2014 and Muscat Sec Blanc Nature 2014

Tetramythos Roditis 2014 and Muscat Sec Blanc Nature 2014

Tetramythos Muscat Sec Blanc Nature 2014, PGI Peloponnese, Greece

Nothing short of lucent, this friable, direct and crunchy raw Muscat. Effusive of individual vowels and consonants, typically Achaian, extrapolated to Greek in its lambent and inventive simplicity. More glade than wax, it coats with orange and the spirit of lime. So different and yet so familiar, inevitably dry and straight as an arrow. Drink 2015-2018.  Tasted July 2015

Tetramythos Mavro Kalavryta 2014 (SAQ 11885457WineAlign)

A terrific example for a grape saved from extinction, Tetramythos owns 1.9 of a total four hectares of MK. Kudos for the effort especially considering the variety is thin skinned, slow to mature and difficult to cultivate. Saw nearly 20 days of skin contact because “the variety dictates the practice,” notes Konstantinos Lazarakis M.W. The fruit and bitters express a push-pull of terroir. One of two wineries making dry wines from the endemic variety, here the fresh red grape, the food friendly marker. Here confidently struts modern Achaian winemaking, from the ashes of naturalism and antiquity, the way Gamay or Loire Cabernet Franc are wont to do. Vibrant, with verve and a necessary natural funk. Herbal and with a rub of tomato skin, creamy, cool yet resinous, followed through from aroma to texture. Drink 2015-2018.  Tasted July 2015

Kotrotsos Moschofilero Erasmios 2014 and Tetramythos Mavro Kalavryta 2014

Kotrotsos Moschofilero Erasmios 2014 and Tetramythos Mavro Kalavryta 2014

Domaine Mega Spileo (Cavino)

The domain is set within a dramatically oriented steppe of an amphitheatre, in a bowl beneath the shadow of a 940m rock that houses the great Greek Orthodox monastery of Mega Spileo (Grand Cave). Nowhere else in the Chelmos mountains does monk viticulture resonate as it does here. The great vineyard (Megali Ambelos) perches above the Vouraikos Canyon at 800m of height. The winemaker for the wines of Cavino and Mega Spileo is Stelios Tsiris. Varieties grown since re-planting in 1999 include Mavrodafne, Mavro Kalavritino, Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot, Syrah, Lagorthi, Assyrtiko, Malagousia and Riesling.

Mega Spileo Monastery

Mega Spileo Monastery

Moschato 2014, PGI Achaia, Greece

Nearly bone dry (4 g/L RS) and well-nigh nicked by acidity (6.2 g/L TA) this is really a true expression of the Muscat Blanc à Petits Grains, an elegant cold pour into a glass on a breezy, sunny day. Until now Muscat in Achaia “could never look me in the eye” but the flurry of aromatics sing like a songstress in white lace. Its gaze is like lemon and olive oil and its tongue like the sweet wax on the rind. Here the Moschato path has been properly and soulfully taken. Rich in gold, like the kingdom of Agamemnon at Mycenae. Drink 2015-2017.  Tasted July 2015

Deus Rosato NV, Peloponnese, Greece

Made from 100 per cent Syrah and slightly sweeter than the Muscat, here at 60 g/L RS. The lees, cheese and funk from Syrah turned to sparkling distracts from the sweetness, sending this to parts of southern France in meditative, Mediterranean, savoire savour faire. Raspberry and cranberry vie for sweet and sour supremacy and the wine actually, seemingly turns dry on the peppery, fizzy, tanky and spirited back side. Never backs down and the last conceit is one of tannin. So much more successful than the Moschato. Drink 2015-2019.  Tasted July 2015

Mega Spileo Moschato 2014 Deus and Deus Rose

Mega Spileo Moschato 2014 Deus and Deus Rose

Cavino Mavrodafne Reserve 2000 (Winery)

“We are about to experience one of the best underdogs of Greece,” says Konstantinos Lazarakis M.W. by way of introduction. The world had to wait 18 months plus seven years years for this to appear. A Port-style fortified red, fashioned from the 27 best judged oak barrels and finished in October of 2000. The mix is Mavrodaphne (70 per cent) and Black Corinth (30), expertly amassed and positioned at a time when using the 49 percent maximum allowance of dried raisin was the norm. Ahead of its time in that regards but also because of its rangy acidity, incredible acidity actually, something that gives this dessert wine the essence and spirit of raisin radio. That and a beautiful oxidation and it succeeds in wooing palates, not to mention fulfilling the promise laid bare by Mr. Lazarakis. Drink 2015-2020.  Tasted July 2015

Parparoussis

Achilleos str., 264 42 Proastio, Patras, Greece, 30 2610 420334, info@parparoussis.com

Antanassis Parparoussis and Moschato Vines, Domaine Parparoussis

Athanassios Parparoussis and Moschato Vines, Domaine Parparoussis

Founded in 1974 by oenologist Athanassios Parparoussis who works as winemaker while daughters Erifili and Dimitra support on the business and marketing side. The winery is located in Patras and the property includes 10 hectares at Movri Achaias. Grapes are farmed organically and Parparoussis is one of only two vintners ion the region making wines from the rare and indigenous Sideritis. Parparoussis farms organically in principal but is not certified, nor is Athanassios concerned with the designation. It’s a matter of being devoutly pragmatic. “The soil is alive, so why kill it.”

Parparoussis Sideritis Dons De Dionysos 2014, Peloponnese, Greece (SAQ 11900995, $21.00, WineAlign)

The 2014 “gift of Dionysus” is herbal, arid, directly unassuming and fixed with a very savoury, nearly resinous pastel palate. The wind blows rosemary and lavender and truthfully it’s like a naturally cured red feeling in a white package. All lemon citrus at the tail. Drink 2015-2016.  Tasted July 2015

Parparoussis Rosé “Petite Fleur” 2014, PGI Achaia, Peloponnese, Greece

Just under 300 cases are made of this pale, lithe and prodigiously lithe blush wine, like the Dionysus, made from 100 per cent Sideritis. Skin maceration was performed overnight, “a one night stand,” while indigenous yeast was employed for a natural, dry vinification. The light and rust-directed antiquity of caste excess has caused an exaggerated herbal, namely oregano aroma. The overall feel is suppositious and may just be one of the great Rosé stories ever told. Drink 2015-2016.  Tasted July 2015

Parparoussis Sideritis Gift of Dionysus 2014 and Agiorgitiko Reserve 2010

Parparoussis Sideritis Gift of Dionysus 2014 and Agiorgitiko Reserve 2010

Parparoussis Taos 2010, PGI Achaia, Greece

A barrel fermented, dry vinified, 100 per cent Mavrodaphne. Naturally pitchy, high in acidity and purposed in tannin. A rare zero dilution at the hands of Black Corinthian Raisin and therefore not so high in alcohol, despite the richness of hue. Actually has a modern next tier level of complexity, complexion and aromatic intensity. Purple flowers and plum swirl in its circuitous, cycloid multiplicity. The savoury, resinous black bay laurel and chalky, cooked lentil, the grill and its smouldering charcoal are all in. Further resinous of bay oil on the back bitters and a very Tentura finish. Wild, sauvage, beautiful and built for the ling haul. Drink 2018-2025.  Tasted July 2015

Oenoforos (Rouvalis)

Selinous, 25100 – Aiyion, Greece, 30 2691029415, info@rouvaliswinery.gr.

Aneglos Rouvalis and WineAlign's DJ Kearney

Aneglos Rouvalis and WineAlign’s DJ Kearney

Eonologist is Angelos Rouvalis, a winemaker with an encyclopedic knowledge of every hill and slope in the mountains above Patras and where each variety grows best. Established in 1990 by Rouvalis, a Bordeaux-trained winemaker, recognized internationally as a pioneer in the renaissance that has taken place in the Greek wine industry in recent years. In 1994 Yannis Karabatsos, an agricultural engineer and expert in Greek viticulture joined the winery. “The Oenoforos winery consists of five levels on the slopes of Aigialeia in the village of Selinous. It combines monastic simplicity with state-of-the-art technology.”

Oeneforos Roditis ‘Asprolithi’ 2014, PDO Patras, Greece (SAQ 978197, $16.50, WineAlign)

The “white stone” could be considered the Pinot Grigio of Greece though the pink-skinned variety grown here between 800-1000m is such a bleed of high altitude calcaire. An amalgamated, aromatic accumulation is all about citrus without the airs of pierce and secondary sandarac meets kedros that reminds of clementine. At 11.5 per cent alcohol and low pH it might confuse for Trocken Riesling if not for its classic herbiage and austerity. Drink 2015-2018.  Tasted July 2015

Antonopoulos Vineyards

25008 Vassiliko Chalandritsas, Patra, 30 2694061447, info@antonopoulosvineyards.com

The winery was founded by the late visionary winemaker, Constantinos Antonopoulos near the city of Patras in the northwestern of Peloponnese. Constantinos saw the vast, untapped potential of this diverse landscape, especially the mountainous region of Achaia and the unique winemaking opportunities it presented. A new up to-date winery has been built recently at Vasiliko, Achaia, where the majority of the winery’s vineyards are. Indigenous Greek varieties are the focus. All three Antonopoulos wines tasted at the winery Achaia Clauss were clearly achieved through very serious work. Though clean beyond the pale, they all exhibit slightly to more than leesy and all finish with so much salinity and limestone inflection. The only thing missing is the crustaceous accent.

Antonopoulos Vineyards

Antonopoulos Vineyards

Antonopoulos Adholi This White 2014, PGI Achaia, Greece

Essential and pedigreed blend of Lohorthi 65 per cent), Chardonnay (20) and Roditis (15) that expresses increased aromatics much like Viognier. Nearly profoundly tropical but so very dry, like Assyrtiko in its cracking open but with the feel of wild yeast and the feign of barrel. Chalk it up to 800-900m clay-limestone speak and no more than that, creasing to a crisp effervescence without bubble, yet it does tingle of the tongue. Like it’s working all the while, then on to citrus on the end, in lemon and lime torque as if by Riesling. The Moschofilero might be Mycenaean Linear B and this the other, later Greek alphabet. Drink 2015-2018.  Tasted July 2015

Acheon Winery

Korinthou 121, Aigio, Greece, 30 26910 28062, info@acheonwinery.gr.

Sosanna Katsikosta is Oenologist and General Manager while Katerina heads up business and marketing operations. The sisters are carrying on a winemaking tradition passed on to them from their late father. Konstantinos Katsikostas carried the torch from his father Luke who founded the winery in 1946 in the area of Palaiokamares of Aegio. Annual production of 2,000 cases. Katsikosta is desperately, passionately practicing, experimenting, trying to stir up vinous ghosts and find their way back to ancestry, to ways of elders, to bring to light what used to be and to establish an identity for the world to see.

Acheon Sideritis 2014, PGI Achaia, Greece

The nearly extant one, a rare variety, being revived, planted at low altitudes, with yields 70-75 hL/L. Aromatic and misunderstood, with a Savagnin character, a funky, musky skin, like leather but not as deep, yet something oddly tropical, like jackfruit, or gummy bear, dusty ginger, and resin, like thyme. Another variety being worked with to see what it can be and to link back to what once was. Really good acidity. Drink 2015-2016.  Tasted July 2015

Kotrotsos

Vassiliko Achaias TK. 25008, 30 26940 61 900, vinko@otenet.gr. Winemaker is Giannis Kotrotsos.

Kotrotsos Mavrodaphne NV, PDO Mavrodaphne of Patras, Greece The standard 15 per cent alcohol and in this plugged in, short fuse sweet wine is highly intense and lit caper green, dried fruit and a serious pasticcio of botanicals, distilled into a major excitative and concentrated sweetness.  The second bottle tasted has so much more life and character. Much more sweet floral attractiveness and the sweetness is less pronounced as a result. Goes from spice and piquancy to sweetness with the right transitory methodology, culminating in a great LBV Port finish. Nutty and spicy. Tremendous fruit forward expression.  Drink 2016-2024.  Tasted July 2015

Karelas Winery

Georgios J. Karellas A.V.E.E, 41-43, Skagiopouliou Str., Patras, 262 22, 30 2610 321 000, karelas7@hotmail.com

Karelas Winery was founded in 1936 by Georgios Karelas. Using the native ‘Mavrodaphne’ grape, the company is renowned for it’s sweet, dessert style Mavrodaphne wine.
Mega Spileo Mavrodaphne and Karelas Mavrodaphe Reserve 2009

Mega Spileo Mavrodaphne and Karelas Mavrodaphe Reserve 2009

Karelas Mavrodaphne Reserve 2009, PDO Mavrodaphne of Patras, Greece

The only Mavrodaphne aged in highly seasoned toasted new French barrels. The standard weight bearing 15 per cent alcohol and a similar feeling as with previous kicks at the sweet Mavrodaphne can, but more red fruit and brighter raisins in the sun. The spice and liqueur here seem less spirited and combine for a more mature, seasoned, reasoned, direct and ultimately cleaner expression. Captain Jack (or George) will get you Achaia tonight “and take you to your special island.” Drink 2015-2022.  Tasted July 2015

Loukatos

Loukatos Bros, Β 3 & ΟΤ 24, Industrial Zone Patra 25018 Achaia / Patra, Greece, 30 2610 647588,  info@loukatos.com.gr

Perhaps most famous for their local production of spirits, namely Tentura and Mastic, Loukatos does a bang up job with dessert wines, especially in their handling of Muscat from Patras.

Loukatos Muscat of Patras and Mavrodaphne of Patras

Loukatos Muscat of Patras and Mavrodaphne of Patras

Loukatos Muscat NV, PDO Muscat of Patras (WineAlign)

A 15 per cent abv Vin de Liqueur largely based on the 2013 vintage. Very clementine and apricot nosed, impeccably balanced from viscous to intensity in grape, with nothing musty or musky about it, though there is a musk melon sense, a botrytis that is very clean. Another excellent, natural sweet Patras example of what Muscat can do, again at super low cost, with high flavour and here, more fruit forward than the Kotrotos. Drink 2015-2021.  Tasted July 2015

Old cask and young DJ Kearney at Achaia Clauss, Aigialia, Achaia

Old cask and young DJ Kearney at Achaia Clauss, Egialia, Achaia

Crisis? No one’s gonna bring Greece down, nor me neither, ’till I again reach Achaia ground.

Good to go!

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Getting into Greece

Thymiopoulos Young Vines Xinomavro 2013 and Yn Kai Oupavós 'Earth and Sky' Xinomavro 2012

Thymiopoulos Young Vines Xinomavro 2013 and Yn Kai Oupavós ‘Earth and Sky’ Xinomavro 2012

Tomorrow I fly to Greece. The Globe and Mail and most of the global media would have you believe that the country is gripped by fear and uncertainty. I’m going anyway. I would imagine the people of Greece understand your concerns but in the world of New Wines of Greece everything is business as usual and the country remains of the safest places to visit. It will be the most interesting of times, in life and in wine.

My Greek adventure will focus on the region of Achaia, in Patra, Diakofto and Kalavryta. I will visit with and taste the wines of Parparoussis, Kotrotsos, Loukatos, Achaia, Antonopoulos, Karelas, Hahalis, Union of Cooperatives of Patras, Aegialia, Oenoforos, Katsikostas, Cavino and Tetramythos.

A capital and paramount taste of Greece came to Toronto’s Sudbury-Glass Factory on May 5th. Fifty-one wineries were represented. The ingress to the New Wines of Greece was formidable and collectively the 150 plus wines spoke of a language that contains the ancient loneliness of ruins. They also spoke in presence of a present that looks with modern eyes to the future.

Related – A new Greek morning

Tomorrow I will head to Achaia, a part of the northern coast of the Peloponnese. The sweet red vin doux of Mavrodaphne, the Muscat of Patras and the lemon-saline whites of Roditis await. There will also be surprises I am not yet able to fathom.

In addition to a handful of exceptional wines tasted at the May event, on July 11th VINTAGES will be releasing two worthy adversaries to consider against a world of whites for the summer patio, cottage and all-around quenching season. Once you go Malagousia you may never go back.

Alpha Estate Axia Malagousia 2014, Pgi Florina, Greece (371666, $16.95, WineAlign) From the VINTAGES July 11th, 2015 release

Alpha Estate Axia Malagouzia 2014

Alpha Estate Axia Malagouzia 2014

A northwestern Greece, Amyndeon cuvée fashioned by winemaker Angelos Latridis, this Malagouzia resides on the metallic meets mineral spoke. The alloy is spoken in medium-bodied tones though it lengthens recursively to include bright, ripe orchard fruit. A solid, reputable and worthy venture into the world of new and varied varietal play, set to repeat. Drink 2015-2018.  Tasted June 2015  @EstateAlpha  @Eurovintage

Cavino

Cavino

Cavino Grande Reserve Nemea 2008, Pdo Greece (295618, $17.95, WineAlign)

Tasted once again, this time beside the $15 Nemea Reserve 2009, a wine that shows the subtle difference, namely the antiquity and rust that pronounces in the GR. If the fruit is cleaner and more direct in the Reserve, in the GR it is more like Schetos, black and strong. Try it at @BarqueButchers. Drink 2015-2018.
From my earlier note of April 2015:
St. George persists as a tremendous deal in Peloponnese red. Rustic charm and righteous liqueur fill the air from drift to waft. Prime Agiorgitiko acidity and fine-grained tannin. This will live for 7-10 years. Drink 2015-2018.

From my earlier note of November 2014:

Nemea strikes again. Dark rust, earth juiced on and of the . Like Sangiovese with attitude, made by Romans, like Syrah the way it was made in mythological times, by Greeks. A classical garden. This is actually quite modern and expressive for Agiorgitiko. Acts as if it were a touch clay (or amphora) baked but it’s really just a Peleponnese take on oak aging (18 months) and further bottle rest (12 months). This is right in its window and will be friendly for three to five years more. What a steal.

Last tasted May 2015

Thymiopoulos Vineyards Yn Kai Oupavós ‘Earth and Sky’ Xinomavro 2012, Unfiltered, Naoussa, Greece (371666, $19.95, WineAlign)

By my count this is Apostolos Thymiopoulos’ ninth vintage of the “Ghi kai Uranos,” a Xinomavro that while consummately Naoussan, could sketch out in seriatum somewhere between Cru Beaujolais and Barolo. The 2012 leans further to the side of the Nebbioli, but of a deep, dark and richly modern variety. More earth than sky, the ferric grit mixed with tar and roses symbiotically subsume one another. This intoxicating perfume goes right to the back of the aromatic and aneurusma eye. This wine has never shown so much body and wealth of layered flavour. Earth and sky, both, together meeting as if for the first time, love immediate, in whole accord, nodding and acknowledging the ten years of time needed to consummate their union. Drink 2017-2022.  Tasted May 2015  @thymiopoulosvin

Nicole Artopoulos of Victory wines and Spirits with Godello

Nicole Artopoulos of Victory wines and Spirits with Godello

Thymiopoulos Young Vines Xinomavro 2013, Naoussa, Greece (Agent, $20.00, WineAlign)

The Young Vines is an orange to the Earth and Sky’s apple, of a change of fruit and a pace that is hot off the press. Yet it is not without some ancient wisdom. In some new world sites vines up to 15 years of age would be considered old growth adults. In a Greek vineyard like that of a Naoussan like Thymiopoulos, they are babies of the sun. The Xinomavro here is fresh, momentarily acts strikingly brazen, bracing and ultimately, blatantly beatific. With a glass of the young vines in hand to it I say, “it’s not the pale moon that excites me, that thrills and delights me. Oh no, it’s just the nearness of you.” Like Norah Jones in a glass, sultry, contemporary, lightly smoky, of a jazz aesthetic and a pop sensibility. And wild berries. So fresh, so good. Drink 2015-2019.  Tasted May 2015

Domaine Gerovassiliou Malagousia Vieilles Vignes 2014, Thessaloniki, Greece (416792, $23.95, WineAlign) From the VINTAGES July 11th, 2015 release

Domaine Gerovassiliou Malagousia Vieilles Vignes 2014

Domaine Gerovassiliou Malagousia Vieilles Vignes 2014

Malagousia of a singular concentration and energizing as if by waters of Okeanos. Intensely, organically and historically purposed, of salinity that is perfectly mineral, but also fleshy and fruity, as if sourced from fresh water. Flavours are echoed in the guise of briny sea creatures and flinty eruptions coming together in a pool of ancient waters. Full open water rolling swells of unctuous palate depth, mineral to a titan degree and offering such a perfect foil for grilled seafood, dropped with pungent herbs and squeezes of citrus. Drink 2015-2020.  Tasted June 2015  @ktimagerovass  @KolonakiGroup  @DrinkGreekWine  @ShopGreekWine  @SteveKriaris

Peza Union Nissos

Peza Union Nissos Red 2013

Peza Union Nissos Red 2013, PGI Crete (Winery, No CDN price)

A fascinating red blend composed of Kotsifali (80 per cent) and Syrah (20) grown in south-central Crete. The thick-skinned variety Kotsifali releases resin and essential oils into the must and in the final product there is a keen sense of dark plums. It’s rich and dusty, not unlike Merlot but so much more island rustic Mediterranean, with attributes akin to the black olive, caper and garrigue aspects of southern France. The Syrah ensures this ratio and also helps to soothe the tannic grit. The Nissos also possesses a sense of coffee, but of a more natural crushed concoction, like chicory. Fine wine but certainly verdant, agrarian and countrified, though beautifully charming.  @winesofcrete

Gavalas

Gavalas

Gavalas Winery Assyrtiko Natural Ferment 2014, PDO Santorini, Greece (Winery, No CDN price)

A completely different animal in Assyrtiko, an edible that makes contact, by skin, with a nose that is entirely spontaneous and natal. The blanketing of perfunctory aromatics is startling, invigorating and comforting. In some ways it is a more dangerous Assyrtiko, as if it walks a razor’s edge and might bleed out its character at any moment. That tension and risk esteem is what drives the natural mechanism and renders it oxidative in just the right sort of way. So very pronounced in citrus, even at the expense of mineral until the finish. Its fullness and complexity allows acidity to survive and thrive. A wild one to be sure. Drink 2015-2020.  Tasted May 2015  @Santoriniwines

Santo Santorini Grand Reserve 2012

Santo Santorini Grand Reserve 2012

Santo Santorini Grand Reserve 2012, Pdo Santorini (Agent, Price Unknown)

Here Assyrtiko of an aroma never before nosed, like a bleed of fresh concrete, minerals under a computational microscope focused on the sense of smell. Like a wreath of dried white roses. This is an elixir of immortality, a nectar of gods and demigods. Already indicating the initialization of a slow-honeyed development, there will be 15 years in its quiescent and recessed future. This is the Greek equivalent of Bordeaux Blanc, a Grand Cru Classé in the guise of Santorini. Drink 2017-2027.  Tasted May 2015  @santo_wines  @KolonakiGroup

Biblia Chora

Biblia Chora

Biblia Chora Olivos White 2013, PGI Pangeon, Greece (Agent, Price unknown)

A remarkable and au courant 50/50 blend of Assyrtiko and Sémillon, like stumbling upon an undiscovered truth in assemblage. The wine spent nine months in oak, solidifying and hydrating the salinity. It certainly has an essence and a presence that reminds of OZ, of a Hunter Valley structure but the Olivos is so much more piercing, of citrus and mineral, due to the confidence and alpha variety élan of Assyrtiko. It’s also more direct and linear, of acidity and a double whammy of minerality. Salient brackish brine, chalky limestone like Burgundy and yet thinking, feeling, dreaming in Bordeaux. Just wow. Drink 2016-2022.  Tasted May 2015  @KolonakiGroup  @Wines_ofNorthGR

Good to go!

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A new Greek morning

Smythe Park

Smythe Park

Every day brings a new morning when wine tasting in on the schedule. There are many tasters, writers, critics and Sommeliers who do not love working in such a way, tasting wine so early in the day. A table full of jammy Shiraz or warm vintage Bordeaux might scare me too but a Greek tasting? In. There. Any time, night or day. Bring it on.

If you have not recently acquainted or re-acquainted yourself with the new wines of Greece, which are actually the old ones save for advancing technologies, clean as whistle viti-viniculture and winemaking brilliance from masters to young apprentices, it’s Mt. Olympus time you did.

Can’t you hear that rooster crowing?
Rabbit running down across the road

From Assyrtiko to Retsina, Debina to Moschofilero, Agiorgitiko to Xinomavro, Amyndeon to Zitsa, Nemea to Thessaloniki, Naoussa to Santorini, Greek wine is diverse, complex and critical to wine blessedness. Don’t even get me started on volcanic. That opus shall be left to Master Sommelier John Szabo.

Me, I’ll concentrate on the divine mythology of Greek wine, of its place in the fractal world, how it can beautify and simplify, through recursion in dynamic systems, the bleak chaos of wine landscapes. Like the Morai, Greek wines are thread with motherly nurturing. For mere mortals, they direct fate from the birth of their drinking days to death. They are a highly independent bunch, unobstructed and driven by necessity.

The call to assembly of WineAlign critics last week for a table full of Greek whites, reds and one righteous Rosé meant that fate was on side, ready and willing to facilitate a tasting full of exemplary and impressive wines. For a full report on Greek wines, read John Szabo’s words of necessity at WineAlign: Confident wines from Original Vines: Reasons to Drink Greek.

In anticipation of next week’s Greek wine show at which 50 wineries will pour for media and trade in Toronto, I tasted through 25 samples on that new morning. An exceedingly promising number (more than half of what was presented) showed state-of-the-art antiquity and eternal modernity. I’ve chosen ten to highlight here, all worthy of your attention, time and palate. All under $25.

From left to right: Kechri Kechribari Retsina, Kir Yianni Akakies Rosé 2013, Boutari Agiorgitiko 2013, Domaine Glinavos Primus Zitsa 2013 and Tselepos Classique Mantinia Moschofilero 2013

From left to right: Kechri Kechribari Retsina, Kir Yianni Akakies Rosé 2013, Boutari Agiorgitiko 2013, Domaine Glinavos Primus Zitsa 2013 and Tselepos Classique Mantinia Moschofilero 2013

Kechri Kechribari Retsina, Greece (581942, 500ml $7.75, WineAlign)

The resin, the steam room herbal essential oil, the ancient feeling of tonics to heal a wounded soul. It’s all in this tidy little $7 package of wine mythology. That there still exists a market for wine made in this way, with this attention to wise, classic detail, is just amazing. Rosemary and here, even more so oregano are distilled, purely, effortlessly, with peat and macro-oxygenated matter of fact sensibility. Unctuous and viscous elixir, old school to the xyz degree and a pure form of abc ancient Greece. As JS nots, “everyone needs a flagon of Retsina.” Truer words may not be spoken. One must debate, with well into the night philosophy, drawing inspiration from Plato and Aristotle, whether the long, long finish is good, or evil. I’m not sure this will ever tire, or spoil. Drink 2015-2022.  Tasted April 2015

Kir Yianni Akakies Rosé 2013, Ao Amyndeon, Greece (71050, $9.95, WineAlign)

Xinomavro from the Amyndeon vineyards in northwestern Greece done in a funky lactic, savoury and mom’s feta way. Dry, rhubarb wafting, rosemary branch smouldering, lime and pink grapefruit tasting Rosé. This will and should have many fans, particularly those of Tavel on holiday in the ancient continent and needing salinity to match their suckling roast. Clear, concise Rosé. Proper. Drink 2015-2106. Tasted April 2015

Kechri Kechribari Retsina and Kir Yianni Akakies Rosé 2013

Kechri Kechribari Retsina and Kir Yianni Akakies Rosé 2013

Boutari Agiorgitiko 2013, Nemea, Greece (172148, $11.85, WineAlign)

Fun, exuberant, fresh, modern cherry explosion expression. Simple, direct, positive energy and ease of drinkability. Has just enough spice, floral lift and back end bite to afford it three years of service, with any sort of roast meat or salty cheese. Good stuff. Drink 2015-2017.  Tasted April 2015

Domaine Glinavos Primus Zitsa 2013, Zitsa, Greece (395962, $12.55, WineAlign)

From the Debina variety in Ioannina, it would be hard to find another Greek white that offers up as much orchard fruit, primarily from the apple and pear tree thicket. Accents of white peach and lemon make a quick entry and exit just as quick. This is a really crunchy green apple white, picked ripe and finishes with ripe white tannin. It’s not very long but I can think of many, many savoury dishes that would complement with symbiotic pleasure. Drink 2015-2017.  Tasted April 2015

Tselepos Classique Mantinia Moschofilero 2013, Mantinia, Greece (724583, $14.75, WineAlign)

An example for racing Moschofilero against Pinot Grigio and passing it on the stretch run from the outside lane. There are many reasons to go with this variety when narrow thinking leans PG, mostly because it has more depth, mineral grain and positive energy. This is a basic but prime entry into the category. Has the passage of time in its wheelhouse but also the verve to keep it afloat in a sea of sun drenched whites. Drink 2015-2016.

From my earlier November 2014 note: A textured, minutely oxidative and bronzing Moschofilero with a confident sense of itself. The orchard has ripened and spilled into this bottle with peaches, apricots and citrus Portokalia Lakonias. Great metal tang, world turning acidity and length as long as the Nestani’s walk to Demeter’s Temple.

Last tasted April 2015

From left to right: Santo Assyrtiko 2014, Cavino Grande Reserve Nemea 2008, Argyros Assyrtiko 2014, Ktima Kir Yianni 2011, Domaine Gerovassiliou Malagousia Vieilles Vignes 2013

From left to right: Santo Assyrtiko 2014, Cavino Grande Reserve Nemea 2008, Argyros Assyrtiko 2014, Ktima Kir Yianni 2011, Domaine Gerovassiliou Malagousia Vieilles Vignes 2013

Santo Assyrtiko 2014, Pdo Santorini, Greece (Agent, $17.95, WineAlign)

Assyrtiko seemingly dredged in volcanic tuff erosion and tightly wound by straight-shooting citrus smack. A rocky cragg of funk leads to desire, for hearth roasted sea beauties and yet this is not even near the oxidized line. Such a white from Santorini needs at least three years to see where it might truly go. I know a sucker for acid driven volcanic wines that evoke the god Apollo. This is yet another fine example that will bring him sunshine and the moon. Drink 2017-2021.  Tasted April 2015

Cavino Grande Reserve Nemea 2008, Pdo Nemea, Greece (295618, $17.95, WineAlign)

St. George persists as a tremendous deal in Peloponnese red. Rustic charm and righteous liqueur fill the air from drift to waft. Prime Agiortiko acidity and fine grained tannin. This will live for 7-10 years. Drink 2015-2018.

From my earlier November 2014 note: Nemea strikes again. Dark rust, earth juiced on and of the rocks. Like Sangiovese with attitude, made by Romans, like Syrah the way it was made in mythological times, by Greeks. A classical garden. This is actually quite modern and expressive for Agiorgitiko. Acts as if it were a touch clay (or amphora) baked but it’s really just a Peleponnese take on oak aging (18 months) and further bottle rest (12 months). This is right in its window and will be friendly for three to five years more. What a steal.

Last tasted April 2015

Argyros Assyrtiko 2014, Santorini, Greece (387365, $19.95, WineAlign)

The most distinct, pure and crisp expression of Assyrtiko comes from this Argyros bottle, magnified with more platinum rock bonding in ’14 than even in the previous few vintages. Exotic evolution has arrived early in this stoic and timelessly chronic Assyrtiko with dramatic fleshing, a hint of hloro tiri and ashen black sand grit. A volcanic goddess in patina hued dress, very mineral, very direct, that drives straight for the lumbar zone. Saline, full of shells and mollusc brine. Anything grilled on charcoal, of white flesh, whether porcine, foul or sea sweet will shine alongside, as it always does. Drink 2015-2019.  Tasted April 2015

Greek back labels

Greek back labels

Ktima Kir Yianni 2011, PGI Imathia, Greece (419234, $19.95, WineAlign)

Xinomavro (40 per cent) submits to Merlot (60) in a rather weighty and warm Imathia out of Naoussa. Chewy to dense and yet floral dark fruit gives this eminent drinkability, especially with salty protein, though it would be hard to distinguish this from Tuscan Sangiovese or IGT. Very modern, really well made and certainly no stranger to oak. Drink 2015-2020.  Tasted April 2015

Domaine Gerovassiliou Malagousia Vieilles Vignes 2013, Thessaloniki, Greece (Agent, $24.95, WineAlign)

From old parcels planted to the indigenous variety Malagousia, resurrected like a Greek Jesus in the 1970’s by winemaker Vangelis Gerovassiliou. A classical composition with unexpectedly modern eccentricity. It would be hard not to fall for this Adonis of Greek whites; a strikingly beautiful Phoenician whose drops of liqueur turn to liquid alloy in a glass, of a striking green-gold patina, old barrel spirits and precious metals. This has layers of vine wisdom, fruit that holds its own against the mineral drubbing and ghosts of immortal gods in its aura. Rarely does a Greek white exude such ferocity of history and flesh to match. Calamari and octopus await, in whole roast over charcoal, not to mention great cheeses and roast pork. Fantastic. Will age dutifully. Drink 2016-2025.  Tasted April 2015

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Let the gems begin

Wine review at VINTAGES of Norman Hardie Chardonnay Niagara Unfiltered 2012 by Godello

Wine review at VINTAGES of Norman Hardie Chardonnay County Unfiltered 2012 by Godello

If the premature lashing of cold, snow and ice weren’t enough to get you thinking about holiday shopping, get thee to a Liquor Control Board Ontario store on the weekend. Same time, every year. The LCBO stocks the shelves, isles and pyramid displays with more booze than anyone should ever be faced with in one visitation.

Related – Holiday wine gems hit November shelves

The bi-weekly VINTAGES release calendar whirs, undulates and clutters in rataplan overload at just this very juncture in preparation of the Christmas rush. Shoppers will tear down the walls of wine, beer and spirits, only to hear the burloque fall silent when the clock strikes closing time on the evening of December 24th.

There are exactly 35 days left in 2014 to do the right wine thing for that father, cousin, colleague, mentor or loyal, long-time suffering employee. Please heed the warnings and do not buy crap for the one you love or think you should. No matter who you are picking up a bottle for, treat them well and with fermented grape respect.

There are three category of wines to look for, at least within the context of this buying guide. First there are the values under $20, wines made so properly they should cost double or triple what they do. Second are the expensive but honest wines. These are the true gems that make most $100 bottles look bad. Last are the $100 examples that are truly iconic, despite their cost. Though priced beyond the means of most, they are not a mistake to take a flyer and give as a gift. After the hand off is complete, the all-knowing, unspoken nod will follow.

Here are 22 picks from the VINTAGES November 22, 2014 release, in stores now.

From left to right: Cavino Grande Reserve Nemea 2008, Frescobaldi Castello Di Pomino Pomino Bianco 2013, Moris Morellino Di Scansano 2012, Louis Bouillot Perle D'aurore Brut Rosé Crémant De Bourgogne, McWilliam's Mount Pleasant Elizabeth Sémillon 2007, Josef Chromy Pepik Pinot Noir 2012

From left to right: Cavino Grande Reserve Nemea 2008, Frescobaldi Castello Di Pomino Pomino Bianco 2013, Moris Morellino Di Scansano 2012, Louis Bouillot Perle D’aurore Brut Rosé Crémant De Bourgogne, McWilliam’s Mount Pleasant Elizabeth Sémillon 2007, Josef Chromy Pepik Pinot Noir 2012

Cavino Grande Reserve Nemea 2008, Pdo Nemea, Greece (295618, $17.95, WineAlign)

Nemea strikes again. Dark rust, earth juiced on and of the rocks. Like Sangiovese with attitude, made by Romans, like Syrah the way it was made in mythological times, by Greeks. A classical garden. This is actually quite modern and expressive for Agiorgitiko. Acts as if it were a touch clay (or amphora) baked but it’s really just a Peloponnese take on oak aging (18 months) and further bottle rest (12 months). This is right in its window and will be friendly for three to five years more. What a steal.  Tasted November 2014  @DrinkGreekWine

Frescobaldi Castello Di Pomino Pomino Bianco 2013, Doc Pomino Bianco, Tuscany, Italy (65086, $19.95, WineAlign)

With thanks to Chardonnay, the Castello di Pomino 2013 elevates Pinot Blanc to a level not really found anywhere, save perhaps for one or two examples out of B.C. This one really leaves a tannic impression, not unlike some impossibly off-dry Pinot Gris from Alsace. There is a really sophisticated level of ambiance and a semblance of a distinctly rocky intent. Like high quality Sancerre or Chenin from Silex soils, the grain and veins running through the palate and the texture are coarse and cursive. This one writes a new script for Frescobaldi’s Florentine, Apennine mountain estate. Fresh, ventilated and airy as if breathing from blue skies at high altitudes. I can’t recall tasting this level of excellence before and would look forward to no less than five years of enjoying what it brings to the Tuscan table.  Tasted November 2014  @FrescobaldiVini  @liffordretail

Moris Morellino Di Scansano 2012, Docg, Tuscany, Italy (992560, $19.95, WineAlign)

A primarily (90 per cent) Sangiovese with smatterings, though not inconsequential, of Merlot and Syrah. From (non-estate) vineyards in Poggio La Mozza (Grosseto). Morellino Di Scansano, to a wine and exemplified here, sports a firm jaw and an air of tragic nobility. The question is why should it only find occasional psychic prominence as a Sangiovese go to. Moris Farms makes the lesser-known accessible, with a (sees no oak) modern accent of dark fruit and spice atop simple, pleasurable Sangiovese. Pleasantries exchanged, the 2012 MdS will work dinner, inside a Tuscan vernacular and out.  Tasted October 2014  @Morisfarms  @oenophilia1

Louis Bouillot Perle D’aurore Brut Rosé Crémant De Bourgogne, Ac Burgundy, France (48793, $19.95, WineAlign)

The Bouillot Rosé, for my $20 is the most impressive of their line-up, always tender and ripe as if just picked fruit, namely strawberry and raspberry. The Perle D’aurore is a faintly hued and lighthearted take but not light on effort. Elegance defined in Bourgogne bubbles with a savoury edge to give it strength.  Tasted November 2014  @JCB_Wines  @ChartonHobbs

McWilliam’s Mount Pleasant Elizabeth Sémillon 2007, Hunter Valley, New South Wales, Australia (724492, $19.95, WineAlign)

The 2007 is another fascinating study in Hunter Valley Sémillon. Like the ’06, egressing secondary notes have emerged, in equatorial garrigue and fruit having already met its aurulent stenosis. A honey note persists though less so in ’07, as does the level of tempering acidity. This vintage brings out the calm and the clam, though the petrol and the mineral are omnipresent, perhaps elevated. Must keep in mind it’s only $20 but it does fall a bit short in texture and acidity. There is lemon drop and the essential atomic Sémillon stoicism from the Hunter Valley, but it’s a bit thin and hollow up the middle. All that acknowledged, not having a look or two would be a shame. Tasted November 2014  @MtPleasantWines  @PRAXISpr

Josef Chromy Pepik Pinot Noir 2012, Tasmania, Australia (162990, $22.95, WineAlign)

Pepik has elevated aromatic tones and though it appears lithe it reads like a weighty tome. Unique and of its Tasmanian self. Plums come to mind, as does red earth. The phenolic ripeness and varietal indications are ushered in with managed exceptions and are simply spot on. This does not strike as a Pinot Noir that will be long-lived because its black cherry and spice are riper than many contemporary editions in a similar price range, but it will offer great pleasure for two to three years.  Tasted November 2014  @JosefChromy  @bwwines

From left to right: Klumpp Pinot Gris 2013, Creekside Estates The Trad Reserve 2011, Meerlust Rubicon 2008, Tenuta Sette Ponti Crognolo 2011, Faustino I Gran Reserva 2001, Cvne Gran Reserva 2008

From left to right: Klumpp Pinot Gris 2013, Creekside Estates The Trad Reserve 2011, Meerlust Rubicon 2008, Tenuta Sette Ponti Crognolo 2011, Faustino I Gran Reserva 2001, Cvne Gran Reserva 2008

Klumpp Pinot Gris 2013, Qualitätswein, Baden, Germany (394155, $23.95, WineAlign)

Thoroughly interesting study in German Pinot Gris despite the timid and reserved tonal nature. Aridity in as much as the variety can muster and in the largest, atmospheric sense. Though the palate has some fine-grained texture and feigned sweetness, it’s as if Baden can only do Pinots this way, in Gris and in Noir. Acidity is tempered and a willing accomplice to the diminished components of sugar and pH. A well designed Pinot Gris.  Tasted November 2014  @TheLivingVine  @WinesofGermany

Creekside Estates The Trad Reserve 2011, VQA St. David’s Bench, Niagara Peninsula, Ontario (390336, $28.95, WineAlign)

The Trad ’11 has a classic toast and yeast aromatic waft and so it goes that everything that follows is embraced with curiosity and an open mind. Ginger, citrus, bronze and the sweet scents of the inside of a candy machine, its candy long gone. Creekside’s winemaker Rob Power will never be accused of dialing this sparkler in. Tasting trials help determine the necessary, final blend. The single, Queenston Road Vineyard puts 56 per cent Pinot Noir and (44) Chardonnay, aged 2 years in bottle, together for a highly effective, expansive but not explosive fizz. At 8.7 g/L of residual its dry but not quite falling off the bone. The sweetness is tempered by elevated (9.98 g/L) acidity and tension. Spent 24 months on the lees and was bottled back in February. There is balance and pleasure and a good, stretchy finish. No band-aid. Clean, precise, fizz of the day.  Tasted October 2014  @CreeksideWine

Meerlust Rubicon 2008, Wo Stellenbosch, South Africa (64329, $34.95, WineAlign)

Rubber dust, road macadam and strawberry jam. Fierce Bordeaux Blend home from a hot climate. This has gritty obduracy and doggedness. Like a red blend with a gun, walking the mean streets. Acidity shot through the roof. Bordeaux meets South Africa in every shared, resplendent and promising way. Rasping tannins contain bursting dark fruit, the grain running in multiple directions. Respect. Wait two more years on this and drink comfortably to 2020.  Tasted November 2014  @TrialtoON  @WOSACanada

Tenuta Sette Ponti Crognolo 2011, Igt Toscana, Italy (727636, $34.95, WineAlign)

This is not the modern Crognolo as witnessed in the previous five vintages. In 2011 we have been granted the complex Crognolo. This has must and earth. It has grit and girth. Best Crognolo I have tasted. Tangy Sangiovese, with some chalk in tannin. Will live longer and offer unrequited love seven to 10 years down the road, to the patient and the faithful. Tasted November 2014  @TenSettePonti  @TrialtoON

Faustino I Gran Reserva 2001, Doca Rioja, Spain (976662, $35.95, WineAlign)

It amazes me how kept wines from Rioja keep appearing as if they were just bottled yesterday but not this famous Gran Reserva. Syrupy and caramelized, bright and earthy. Mulled plum and clove with citrus accents. Bretty like a barn’s floor. Cedar and leather, big oak doors. Real mutton Rioja, still tannic, energetic and searing. Kicking it old school but wild and alive. From my earlier, April 2014 note: “Were a full-term lecture taught on the pros and cons of the Brettanomyces brannigan, this Rioja might be exhibit A. Absolutely manifest fruit meets earth, meets game perfume compendium. Call it funky yeast if you must but here is a wine that can be approached by nose only and if the relationship were to end there, novels might be written. Lives on a fermented, catalytic and plucky edge but never submits to the bacterial spindrift. Leaden fruit, red and black, smooth and layered with a tension in tang that is paralyzing to the mouth. Thirteen years old and just hitting a secondary stride, with the oak slowly dissolving and not a hint of coffee or chocolate to be found. Sexy and down to earth at the same time.” Last tasted November 2014  @bodegasfaustino  @Select_Wines

Cune Gran Reserva 2008, Doca Rioja, Spain (393553, $38.95, WineAlign)

Old school. Smells like Rioja. Smells like Spanish spirit and weeds, sinew, gristle and braising pig, all parts in. Smells like cedar, like American oak and a soak in a tub of spa earth and mineral salts. Like “Spanish boots of Spanish leather.” This has already done the evolutionary dance so if you are looking for something to float your natural, honest boat, go here now. In a Rioja world where the times they are a changin‘, it will sail you back in time and away into a Mediterranean sunset.  Tasted November 2014  @Cvne  @vonterrabev

From left to right: Fattoria Dei Barbi Brunello Di Montalcino 2008, Dutton Goldfield Dutton Ranch Chardonnay 2012, Vincent Sauvestre Clos De La Platière Pommard 2012, Versado Malbec Reserva 2010, Laurent Perrier Millésimé Vintage Brut Champagne 2004

From left to right: Fattoria Dei Barbi Brunello Di Montalcino 2008, Dutton Goldfield Dutton Ranch Chardonnay 2012, Vincent Sauvestre Clos De La Platière Pommard 2012, Versado Malbec Reserva 2010, Laurent Perrier Millésimé Vintage Brut Champagne 2004

Fattoria Dei Barbi Brunello Di Montalcino 2008, Tuscany, Italy (928028$49.95, WineAlign)

Firm and in a rustic vein, as per the Barbi dole, this one a bit funkier at the outset than many. Welcome to the classic firmness of 2008, antithesis of the flamboyant ’07’s but plan for 20 plus years of slow food elegance emission. Classic rose petal, tea leaves, dates and earth caked metal in this guy. From my earlier, March 2014 note: “As expected, this is a gritty effort from Barbi, in part the impart of a testosterone-laden vintage, along with the dryer and cooler climate from Barbi’s southeastern Montalcino vineyards. A low and slow ripening will surely translate to extended longevity, but the rusticity and leather/cherry continuum will never disappear. No doubt a classic example and very well-priced for such authenticity, still it can’t be helped to see Barbi’s ’08 as entrenched in an earlier period of time. The wine will need 10 years to soften its edges and reveal the refinement and elegance of a well-documented Brunello.”  Last tasted November 2014  @FATTORIABARBI  @Noble_Estates

Dutton Goldfield Dutton Ranch Chardonnay 2012, Russian River Valley, Sonoma County, California (287854, $58.95, WineAlign)

A study in precision, exceptional quality and poise. Golden rays mixed with misty wisps, cool nights tempering warm days. Just a touch of wood spice pricks the finish. So much flavour.  Tasted November 2014  @DuttonGoldfield  @TheVine_RobGroh

Vincent Sauvestre Clos De La Platière Pommard 2012, Burgundy, France (390534, $59.95, WineAlign)

This Pinot Noir speaks for the two sides of every Burgundy argument, especially considering it comes from the gritty nook of Pommard. First impressions are floral and pretty, with spice and some sort of tropical flora whispering in cooing scents. The hill offers a buoyancy, a lifted spirit and a view of its own sweet regard. Travels through a mid-village weightless hover, then returns to terroir in prime time acidity and tannin to keep time. There is a sweet tart medicinal aspect ratio on the finish and overall this does things correctly. Does not finish with the same suave seduction that it teased at the start but it does continue to impress.  Tasted November 2014  @Select_Wines  @BourgogneWines

Versado Malbec Reserva 2010, Luján De Cuyo, Mendoza, Argentina (316984, $60.95, WineAlign)

Aromatics are racing and rising from the glass. A red rain pouring in and out. Has yet to change course. From my earlier, September 2014 note: “The floral emergence is a lodestar as periscope just now peering up from the seamless cake layering in Versado’s most liberally applied oak-imbued Malbec. The 2010 adheres in sticky savour though it remains two to three years away from finding its true gliding form. From my earlier notes through tastings on Oct. 25 and Nov. 14, 2013. “This ultra-premium Mendozan from the Canadian winemaking team of Peter Gamble and Ann Sperling boasts fruit from “the finest barrels from the finest blocks.” While certainly riding a splintered and jammy horse (what fully extracted Mendozan does not), this reserve Malbec has so much else happening, I owe it my time and focus. Dances to a triple jump height in oozing berry, compacted, brick wall infrastructure and overlapping delineation. Really like the consistency here, with no hollow middle, no umlaut, no pregnant pause. Very well made.” Last tasted November 2014  @VersadoWine

Laurent Perrier Millésimé Vintage Brut Champagne 2004, Champagne, France (983874, $84.95, WineAlign)

The reappraised vintage that was once considered good, now revealing itself as better than good uses examples like the Laurent Perrier Millésimé to drive the point. This is a classically symmetrical blend of Chardonnay and Pinot Noir possessive of much chaste class, incredible balance and held lotus posture. Through its waves of idiosyncratic brioche and linear citrus lines drawn in tactile angles this Champagne is unbent and unbroken. Its seamless transitions glide from delicate aromas, through a textured palate and groove forward in elastic length. Additionally graceful with an ever so slightly advanced and mature style from a mature world in vintage-dated Champagne.  Tasted November 2014  @ChampagneLPUSA  @Noble_Estates

From left to right: Mollydooker Carnival Of Love Shiraz 2010, Silver Oak Napa Valley Cabernet Sauvignon 2009, Château Malescot St. Exupéry 2010, Spottswoode Estate Cabernet Sauvignon 2011, Sassicaia 2011

From left to right: Mollydooker Carnival Of Love Shiraz 2010, Silver Oak Napa Valley Cabernet Sauvignon 2009, Château Malescot St. Exupéry 2010, Spottswoode Estate Cabernet Sauvignon 2011, Sassicaia 2011

Mollydooker Carnival Of Love Shiraz 2010, Mclaren Vale, Australia (242732, $114.95, WineAlign)

While the price is just about as absurd as a “yoga class for cats” or Raine Maida’s voice, it seems logical to wonder aloud how one could question this Carnival as not being one of the biggest and baddest Shiraz you will ever encounter. It’s a veritable run on sentence of Shiraz adjectives, adverbs and hyperbole. If your hankering remains entrenched in elevated alcohol, enormity of fruit, condensed and compressed mineral, lest to be forgetting the viscous ooze of Mclaren Vale syrup, well, then this jester should fill your stocking along with those of the rest of your circle of fortifying friends. From the maw of the beast here – blood gore and fruit guts. Holy crap is this extracted, tannic, mired in impropriety, full conceit and in zero jealousy of other Shiraz. It doth joust. Certainly no lady of peace. Wow.  Tasted November 2014  @MollydookerWine  @bwwines

Silver Oak Napa Valley Cabernet Sauvignon 2009, Napa Valley, California (936039, $139.95, WineAlign)

Magnificent and munificent wine. Really special, magnanimous in every way, ultra-luxurious but not over the top. Alcohol, oak and extraction judged and held in check, equity and in balance. The fruit is pure and delicate, marked by plum, blackberry and hovering licorice, anise and spices. Long in chain and really sweet tannins. Like gazing into a pool of real nineties Napa and across the pond to an older school of reasoning. Tasted November 2014  @SilverOak  @HalpernWine

Château Malescot St. Exupéry 2010, Ac Margaux, 3e Cru, Bordeaux, France (261552, $167.95, WineAlign)

A heightened sense of Margaux reality in 2010 comes from the château with the hybrid name; first from Simon Malescot, King’s Counsel to Louis XIV at the Parliament of Bordeaux. Second, from the post French Revolution château purchaser, Count Jean Baptiste St Exupéry, grandfather of the aviator and writer Antoine de St Exupéry. This has to be the most hedonism ever bottled in a Malescot, within reason of course. The house does not know from over the top, save perhaps for the cost of this 2010. Cassis is certainly here, as is a medicinal tension, firm acidity and the most formidable tannins known to Margaux. The grain, chalk and tincture combine for full effect. This will need 10 years to chill, then go 10 plus 10 more to much applause and the request for a final curtain call. Tasted November 2014  @VinsdeBordeaux

Spottswoode Estate Cabernet Sauvignon 2011, Napa Valley, California (399592, $167.95, WineAlign)

Wow. Aromatics are off the charts. Pine forest, leather, chestnut and cedar, savoury in every wild and sauvage way, but also pure. Berries, tobacco leaf, classical logic, structures and axioms lead me to imagine mid-nineties Paulliac. Seamless texture, ripe but not overripe, rich but never overly grainy. This is super fine and dialed back (with exotic spices and wood spice filling in the holes) in the cooler 2011 vintage. A Cabernet Sauvignon of the most savour and the most class. A ten to twenty year Spottswoode.  Tasted November 2014   @Spottswoode  @Smallwinemakers

Sassicaia 2011, Doc Bolgheri, Tuscany, Italy (480533, $199.95, WineAlign)

Certainly a Sassicaia borne of the earth and the vintage. Cooler, with increased sapidity and elevated aromatics. While not volatile there is certainly an intimation at acetic behaviour. Though supportive in only 15 per cent of the two Cabs blend, Cabernet Franc stands firm in its concentration of tobacco, peppercorns a-popping in the pan and a smoldering of currants over an open fire. This will age for decades and return to its beautiful natural state with time-weathered, rugged facial lines. A leathery Sassicaia this, with tight, drying tannins and in need of two decades to show off its birthright. The 2011 Sassicaia is a loyal, aristocratic example to the Marchese Mario Incisa della Rocchetta’s dream of creating a ‘thoroughbred’ wine where the ideal was Bordeaux.  Tasted November 2014  @Smarent

Good to go!

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Money back guarantee wines

Here are five wines that will present no reason to be looking for a refund or an exchange. PHOTO: ARCADY/FOTOLIA.COM

as seen on canada.com

Ever opened a bottle of wine, had a sip or two and decided you just didn’t like it? Happens all the time, right? The thing is, in most cases you can return that wine, especially if it was purchased at one of the many provincial monopolies in Canada. Here’s a short primer on refund, return and exchange policies across Canada.

Related – more current releases

“The SAQ exchanges or refunds any product purchased in an SAQ outlet less than a year before. You must present the sales receipt when requesting a refund. For exchanges, the sales receipt is optional.” The LCBO used to offer their customers that same level of respect to offset the negative impact a monopoly’s policies can effect upon a helpless consumer (monochromatic and or lack of quality choice, lottery selections for small lot and hard to acquire selections, indifferent deference to local product, hyperbolic inflation on comparable US supermarket wines, archaic laws towards inter-provincial shipping, import agent strong arming, to name a few). As of April of 2012, you now have only 30 days to return a bad bottle and unlike the SAQ, you need the receipt for a direct exchange. For LCBO returns, wines “must be in ‘saleable condition’ and accompanied by the original receipt. Saleable means that the product must be unopened and have the label intact, for example.  Defective product is treated differently.” Manitoba follows suit. Who brought these guys to the party?

The same applies to defective products; wines with perceptible flaws, such as TCA (cork taint) or VA (volatile acidity). The 30-day LCBO rule is a sham, I mean shame. The open-ended return policy made up for so much of the monopoly’s shortcomings. Alas, no more.

British Columbia’s Liquor board is no piece of cake either. You can only “return a product in B.C for a full refund, provided the product is unopened, in saleable condition an official BC Liquor Stores receipt for the product is presented.” At least they’ve thrown a bone to caterers who can now return unopened liquor products. Nova Scotia follows Quebec’s policy. “Defective or broken product may be returned to any NSLC store for full exchange or refund and does not require a receipt. All customers returning defective or broken product must be willing to provide name, address and telephone number to the NSLC store representative.”

In Saskatchewan it appears that only “permittees can return any unopened spirit and wine bottles and sealed, full beer cases that were purchased for the event provided they provide the original sales receipt.” Remind me not to purchase defective wine in that province. As far as New Brunswick is concerned “at the discretion of the Liquor Store Manager, Alcool NB Liquor will accept product returns for full refund. The sales slip should accompany the returned item.”

Newfoundland’s system, at least on paper, is very fair and civilized, though all returns seem to be in the powerful hands of a store manager. “NLC will accept product returns, at the discretion of the Liquor Store Manager. In the case of defective merchandise, NLC will permit product returns or exchange, at the discretion of the Liquor Store Manager for a full refund where the product is no more than half empty and he product was listed by NLC within the last 12 months. Better than the LCBO. Best of all may me Prince Edward Island. “At the discretion of the Liquor Store Manager, the PEILCC will accept product returns for full refund. The sales slip should accompany the returned item. All returns will be on a “bottle-for-bottle” basis.” Civilized.

Alberta’s Gaming and Liquor Board only accepts “refunds for the following types of faulty products; returned due to customer complaint; a sealed bottle(s) which: is partially filled; has a damaged cap or cork; or is contaminated with a foreign material. A claim for a refund for a faulty product must be received by the AGLC Product and Pricing Department within 30 days of receipt of product by the claimant.” Quality retailers in provinces with a private system (like Alberta) will also take back an unwanted bottle, though they might not be so lenient when you try to bring back that bottle of First Growth Bordeaux. Some wines are sold with an unwritten rule. You lay down your money and you takes your chances.

Everybody’s got a hungry heart. “Lay down your money and you play your part.” So, to avoid disappointment and disappointing your local monopoly or retailer, here are five bargain wines, one for each day of the week beginning today, Monday June 10th. Five wines that will present no reason to be looking for a refund or an exchange.

From left: Place In The Sun Shiraz 2012, Fielding Estate Gewürztraminer 2010, Lealtanza Crianza 2009, Flat Rock Cellars Riesling 2012, and A & G Papaioannou Estate Agiorgitiko SV Nemea 2007

The Grape: Shiraz

The history: New range of fair trade and sustainable wines from 321 year-old Stellenbosch winery Zonnenbloem

The lowdown: This is not a cheap bottle of fermented sugar. A breath of restrained, balanced and fresh grapes awaits

The food match: Grilled Rib-Eye Steaks and Local Asparagus

Place In The Sun Shiraz 2012 (286088, $13.10) is a balanced effort “at half the price” of many similar South African wines, here crafted by the Cape’s Zonnenbloem Winery from vineyards cooled by False Bay. Campfire smoke, grilled meat, spice and antipasti char attribute this chewy, biltong red. Characterized by a musical, magical, folk spirituality. A Hoodoo Guru88  @APlaceintheSunSA

The Grape: Gewürztraminer

The history: Grape King Curtis Fielding and winemaker Richie Roberts are swiftly crafting a mid-range, diverse portfolio into the Ontario wine industry, unparalleled in execution and success

The lowdown: This Gewürz leans Alsace in a sweet sense but not in heft or a serious, contemplative way

The food match: Grilled Cumin Salmon

Fielding Estate Gewürztraminer 2010 (146753, $15.95) acts likes lees dessert as almond vanilla pudding with a side of lychee preserve. While I heart more the Riesling and Pinot Gris from winemaker Richie Roberts, this sugarplum Gewürztraminer has earned a rightful place at the table.  88  @FieldingWinery  @RichieWine

The Grape: Tempranillo

The history: Tempranillo specialist from Spain, located in Fuenmayor, in the heart of Rioja

The lowdown: Consistent value Tempranillo from a modern facility crafting wine with a foot in the austerity of the past

The food match: Barque Smokehouse Brisket

Lealtanza Crianza 2009 (114835, $16.95) exhibits more heat and caramelization than previous vintages. Vivid Sangria, pumped up by cherries in simple syrup and fleshy plum fruit. Accented by fennel and basil. Good length and even better value.  89  @bodegasaltanza  @ProfileWineGrp

The Grape: Riesling

The history: Founded in 1999 on the Jordan Bench and operated today by Ed Madronich and his father Ed Madronich Sr. Winemaker is Jay Johnston

The lowdown: This just might be the most trocken Ontario Riesling on the market today

The food match: Grilled Veal Chops and Wild Leeks

Flat Rock Cellars Riesling 2012 (43281, $16.95) is a single varietal conundrum, intensely dry, dusty yet dripping in grape concentration. Huge soda nose, I mean a crazy proboscis. Love the dry entry and off-dry tangent. Twenty Mile Bench issue reminiscent of Rheinhessen. Admirable length and trebled finish.  90  @Winemakersboots @UnfilteredEd

The Grape: Agiorgitiko

The history: Main cultivar from a modern winery of the Ancient Nemea, located in the district of Corinth

The lowdown: A 100% indigenous Greek varietal, aged for one year in oak barrel and further matured in the bottle for six months

The food match: Halloumi

A & G Papaioannou Estate Agiorgitiko SV Nemea 2007 (47977, $19.95) has reached a ripe oxy age but this weathered and sensuous, sun-kissed by gods Greek red is still a classic beauty. Quintarelli-like toffee, tobacco acetic reduction and spiced plum seem like high praise I know but the acidity renders it a wash. Look out, buckets of cherries, tart currants and tar join the fun in this very interesting and intriguing Nemean single vineyard stunner.  89  @KolonakiGroup

Good to Go!